turning river water to drinking

Discussion in 'Preparedness & Survival' started by jmurray192, Feb 12, 2012.

  1. jmurray192

    jmurray192
    wilsonville oregon
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    Well i really dont believe 2012 stufg but it does make me think. Its probley good to just have a few of the basics ready if anthing happened war disaster etc. Water is the main thing. I have been seeing people are making homemade water filters here a link to what im talking about can a filter like this really make just about anything drinkable. Anyone have tips or other better filters i should buy

    Home Made Water Purifier | Make Your Own Homemade Water Purifier

    Sent by my phone ecuse my spelling as i am a retard. : l i love it when i say retard it autocorrects as bubblegum
     
  2. chemist

    chemist
    Beaverton OR
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  3. simpleguy

    simpleguy
    Clackamas
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    jm- we are on the same page, that is the reason i got an extra set of filters and a parts kit with my Berkey system. I am thinking about getting a couple of these Gravity Fed Water Filtration System as well for our earthquake kits(one in our home and one in our in-laws shed(3 doors down, great to have them that close. Not in the same place, but close enough that we can rely on each other for resources.
     
  4. jmurray192

    jmurray192
    wilsonville oregon
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    Found these and are cheaper amazon sells the filters set of two for $55.


    Yes its just a really good idea. I now have a kid and one on the way. I just keep playing in my head them saying daddy im hungry or daddy im thritsy. I need to just have a little back up plan for them. Just in case anything happens sometime in our life. Again not really implying 2012
     
  5. M67

    M67
    NW Oregon
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    jmho~

    2 rules of life, i like to follow:

    It is better to have and not need, than to need and not have.
    Proper Prior Planning Prevents Pi** Poor Performance
     
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  6. jmurray192

    jmurray192
    wilsonville oregon
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    Its set im following this guy... like his set up ordering my 2 filters tommorow. Anyone know where to get foodgrade buckets in portland tigard
    YouTube - Broadcast Yourself.
     
  7. Burt Gummer

    Burt Gummer
    Portland
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    Type FOOD GRADE in a Craigslist search.
     
  8. Sun195

    Sun195
    Pugetropolis, WA
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  9. Mark W.

    Mark W.
    Silverton, OR
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    One thing about these home made filters is that while they might not do as good of job with the little tiny things or maybe some of the chemicals you don't want to be injesting. Should something happen and you do have to rely on a filtration system to provide you with clean water.

    If you first run your water through the homemade filter and remove the bulk of the bad stuff. Your good filter can only last longer. That in my book would be a reason to have a DIY filter setup. As would having a still of some sort for producing distilled water.
     
  10. simpleguy

    simpleguy
    Clackamas
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    Agreed, my thought process is simlar to yours. I believe we will "pre filter" via a sock or cheesecloth, then hit with a few drops of bleach or iodine, let sit for an hour or two, then heat to boiling, let rest to room temp, then filter.
     
  11. Gunner3456

    Gunner3456
    Salem
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    That site looks like nothing more than a commercial to me. It's amazing how much water we need - a minimum of 1 1/2 gallons per day per person for drinking, cooking and hygiene. More would be better because eventually we need to wash clothes and bedding to stay healthy.

    We have a spectacular well with a static level of just 29', so I can manually pump from it using a foot valve pump. I can actually siphon from it to an area on our property down below.

    No one thing will get rid of all of the nasties in water, but a 3 step process will make it safe enough.

    If the water is dirty, filter through regular cloth or let the water settle and dip off the cleanest, or do both, settling first.

    Boil the water for 20 minutes to evaporate "some" chemicals and to kill nasties which chlorine won't kill. If you can't boil, skip it because chlorine will get you close enough in most cases.

    Cool and then chlorinate the water. Clorox will work - 8 drops to 1 gallon of water or 16 drops if the water is dirty. Clorox loses strength as it sits and max shelf life is a year. They say 6 months. So, I buy calcium hypochlorite powder as pool shock. Ten pounds for about $15 at Walmart will purify 16,000 gallons of drinking water, and the shelf life is indefinite if kept dry, out of sunlight and in moderate temps. This is 78% CH and the ingredient must be calcium hypochlorite. There are other pool shocks. Read the label.

    .6 ounce of the 78% CH powder in 1 cup of water makes "Clorox." Weigh it on a postage scale. Make or find a scoop that will repeat that. If you find a pool shock that's different from 78%, do the math. Once made with water, don't trust it for more than 3 months because it will now break down.

    8 drops of "Clorox" in 1 gallon of water makes drinking water unless the water is really dirty. In that case settle out or filter the water and double the drops. If the water tastes too much like chlorine pour it back and forth between buckets or let it set covered with cloth for a day.

    1 heaping teaspoon of CH powder in 2 gallons of water makes a great cleaning and disinfecting solution - not strong enough to be bleach but too strong to drink.

    Just know that boiling won't kill all pathogens and neither will chlorine, but together they will.

    HTH.
     
  12. jmurray192

    jmurray192
    wilsonville oregon
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    Alot of good stuff. Thanks.

    Found buckets and lids with seals at the local bakery. For free.
     
  13. nwdrifter

    nwdrifter
    troutdale oregon
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    I thing a sand layer, charcoal layer in a drip bucket and the pool shock and boil is the way to go. I have no need to spend $200 on some pretty filters you can make yourself with sand and charcoal layers for $10 when the time comes.
     
  14. x1hunter89

    x1hunter89
    gresham oregon
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    if you can drink urine you can drink river water lol
     
  15. Nwcid

    Nwcid
    Yakima and N of Spokane
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    Fire was around long before filters. Boiling water............
     
  16. Gunner3456

    Gunner3456
    Salem
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    A sand filter works really well and you can back-flush or wash the sand and use it over and over. Activated charcoal costs more and doesn't last forever. With any old charcoal, you may get a very high alkalinity. That's part of how they make lye for soap, LOL.

    A bucket, some drilled holes, line with cloth and put in a good thick layer of sand. Good to go and will help a lot. You still need to boil and or chlorinate - whatever you have.

    Again, boiling won't kill all pathogens but neither will chlorine. Together they will.
     
  17. Sun195

    Sun195
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    What's the longest period you've had to live off treated water using your method? (this is a question to anyone)

    I've gone six weeks on filtered water in an area known to have giardia. We had a work crew of 7-8, so we used a lot of water. Nobody got sick, but pumping all that water was a real chore (and hauling it to camp). That's why I'm rah-rah for drip-filters - because I hate pumping water and I know that filters work (for me, in that situation - YMMV and all that).
     
  18. nwdrifter

    nwdrifter
    troutdale oregon
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    another note, this does not work to remove radioactivity. for that you need another bucket filter with 8 inches of dirt taken from under the top 8 inches of ground, put something in the bottom of the bucket to make a voided space of 1 inch add a towel then the dirt. The dirt will filter the radioactivity. then you can filter this water in sand charcoal and bleach.

    Let hope we never need this one
     
  19. jmurray192

    jmurray192
    wilsonville oregon
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    So I wanted to try and clear this up for you drip filter believers. So with my bucket set up and 2 black filters. I "should" be able to make drinking water out of river water. Good enough for a emergency. Short periods of time? Im wanting drip set up.
     
  20. Gunner3456

    Gunner3456
    Salem
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    I don't understand. If your water supply fails and you have to get water from a river or creek, how does that make a drip filter easier? Don't you have to first get the water somehow?

    I'm not flaming; just asking.

    I lived for 5 years on treated water. We had a well on our farm which couldn't be trusted and I built all of the filters myself after we bought the place. They used pressurized water from the well to supply the house and worked great.

    I did buy a chlorinator but I made my own chlorine from calcium hypochlorite because it's handier than buying liquid, and it's a lot cheaper.

    In a non-shtf scenario, I used activated charcoal for a filter and also adapted a swimming pool sand filter. Sand, charcoal, chlorine plumbed in line. The sand filter would back flush manually.
     

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