Quantcast
  1. Sign up now and join over 35,000 northwest gun owners. It's quick, easy, and 100% free!

Trigger Pull

Discussion in 'Handgun Discussion' started by Peteralexander78, Feb 20, 2012.

  1. Peteralexander78

    Peteralexander78 vancouver Slow is smooth, smooth is fast

    Messages:
    336
    Likes Received:
    99
    I have been shooting more different guns these day, through friends as well as meeting new people at the range. I find that there a lot of great guns out there but what I dislike about most of them is the trigger pull. My question is, what firearms have really nice trigger pull right from the factor? When I say nice, I mean short and crisp.
     
  2. NJG26Crux

    NJG26Crux Redmond Member

    Messages:
    32
    Likes Received:
    5
    I think you should focus on a gun you like without considering trigger pull, then have a gunsmith customize the trigger for you. Ultimately this is the cheapest way to get what you want.
     
    evltwn, mjbskwim, ATCclears and 3 others like this.
  3. iamme

    iamme Lane County Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,129
    Likes Received:
    352
    You can find guns with nice triggers, 1911's have one of the best. But most now from factory are kinda lacking due to budget or lawyer laws. Like above find the gun you like and tinker/swap/send to gunsmith to fix it.
     
  4. evltwn

    evltwn Gold Hill Oregon Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

    Messages:
    563
    Likes Received:
    338
    Some have easily modified trigger pulls, with videos on YouTube to aid you. The Browning Buckmark comes to mind. But for my centerfire pistols, a trip to my 'smith was an easy solution.
     
  5. Peteralexander78

    Peteralexander78 vancouver Slow is smooth, smooth is fast

    Messages:
    336
    Likes Received:
    99
    Oh I know that I can always go to the smithy and get a nice trigger job but what the question is, What guns from the factory have a nice trigger pull?
     
  6. NJG26Crux

    NJG26Crux Redmond Member

    Messages:
    32
    Likes Received:
    5
    In trying to answer your questions I delved into the labyrinth known as google and found this interesting article: The Elements of a Trigger Job on an M1911 Pistol

    While this only applies to true 1911's in general it gives a good overview of what is going on in a properly functioning trigger group. I read between the lines that most manufacturers would like to leave their tolerances large and stiff to accomadate more shooters and allow a Gunsmith more to work with while limiting any possible liability in any accidental discharge.

    That being said the only gun's I think would go through such attention to this kind of detail would me a semi custom limited production build such as Wilson does to their 1911's.

    Now springs with time get softer, surfaces get worn, guns in general get broken in and eventually need to be rebuilt. Maybe someone's 20 year old range gun has a perfect trigger to you, but it never came from the factory that way.

    If I am way off base or am answering this wrong please someone PM me.
     
  7. 74sporty

    74sporty metro portland Active Member

    Messages:
    370
    Likes Received:
    50
    i like a lot of modern sa/da triggers on sigs, the barretta's and tangfolio and witness pistols. not the shortest, crispest or lightest but well good enough to help you get good at shooting.
     
  8. Fishnutz

    Fishnutz Hillsboro Member

    Messages:
    129
    Likes Received:
    17
    One word, "Browning!"
    I had a Buckmark with the nicest short breaking of glass trigger, with little to no over travel. From the factory this is the shortest, crispiest trigger I've pulled.
     
  9. XSubSailor

    XSubSailor SW WA Active Member

    Messages:
    248
    Likes Received:
    50
    I gotta say...I think that's terrible advice. If the trigger doesn't work for you, nothing else will. Think about it...when you try a pistol for the first time, what determines whether or not it shoots well for you or feels right to you.

    And I think the OPs question is a good one. No one should have to settle for a crappy trigger with the expectation that it needs a trip to a gunsmith to make it work for you. There ARE pistols out there with decent triggers out of the box. What pisses me off is that it wouldn't cost much more for the manufacturers to build their pistols with a good trigger to start with.

    The tough part is that works for me may not work for you. Of the pistols I've tried recently, the Walther PPQ stands out as having a good trigger out of the box. I'm also a big fan of H&Ks LEM triggers for a CCW pistol. On the other hand, I think Glock triggers suck out of the box. Luckily, you can greatly improve a Glock trigger for less than $50 yourself without having to send it to a gunsmith. Most DA/SA triggers need a lot of break-in or a trip to a good smith to improve them significantly.

    I would recommend settling on a particular trigger type you prefer first (SA, DA/SA, LEM, DAO, striker-fired), and then shoot them BEFORE you buy. I'm still amazed how many gun owners purchase guns without ever having shot one first. Whenever, I'm at the range, I'm always on the lookout for something new that I've never shot before...and I'm very generous in letting my range neighbors try my pistols too.

    Good luck on your search!
     
  10. 45 for me

    45 for me Oregon Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    301
    Likes Received:
    268
    Nobody has mentioned revolvers, but they have some of the best SA triggers out there. Another thing is there is only so much you can do with a striker fired pistol like a Glock. As a general rule, automatics that are single action only will start with a short crisp trigger pull and have the ability to be easily improved. I love the triggers on 1911's. Most 22 SAO's have a good pull too. You can also get SAO models of what are normally SA/DA pistols that will have a better trigger pull, like the Sig X5L1 or the CZ75 SA. I will say it seems to me that polymer pistols usually don't have as good of a trigger pull
     
  11. Dnaltrop

    Dnaltrop Portland, Oregon Member

    Messages:
    105
    Likes Received:
    5
    Old SW Model 10.

    It was my first revolver and ruined me for life. I shoot other guns, but every single trigger I pull is always compared internally to our 70-ish year old Victory model.

    One of the best used guns you can pick up for under $300. Newer ones aren't bad either.
     
  12. Mikej

    Mikej Portland Gold Supporter Gold Supporter 2015 Volunteer 2016 Volunteer

    Messages:
    3,186
    Likes Received:
    3,153
    A big part of trigger pull is the puller, YOU. I don't have a lot of experience but I'll say that the Kimber Stainless II has an excellent trigger pull IMO. I don't say light, as in 2lbs, means great, it's supposedly at about 5lbs and sweet, in my experience so far. That may very well be normal for a lot of 1911s. Now I'm shooting a CZ75 .40. I'd heard how great they are, and I'm expecting to get a group like the Kimber. Rude awakening! I'm not even good from rest compared to the Kimber. I let a man, I know to be a good shot, at the range shoot 10 at 50' and he put most of them inside three inches. Trigger control! Trigger control! As far as I know the guy had never shot a CZ75.

    As said above too, a S&W revolver SA is going to be great pull, an LC9 in DAO is going to suck compared to that. In my limited experience so far I'd say get a gun that feels good in the hand and learn to shoot it.

    Mike
     
  13. evltwn

    evltwn Gold Hill Oregon Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

    Messages:
    563
    Likes Received:
    338
    I just wanted to add another thought to this topic...unless your proposed new pistol is really high end, it was...wait for it, mass produced. It was created with the features that meet its price point, and the "perfect" trigger is generally not among the features offered. In addition, among the company's officers, is, yes, you guessed it, a lawyer, or two, or TEN. Their objective is NOT to give you a sweet, light, crisp trigger...its to keep lawsuits from their desks. So, find the gun you like, take it to your smith for refinement, or...keep looking for that gun that "should" be perfect in every way. While you are searching, I will be shooting.