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Trap shooting

Discussion in 'Competitive Shooting' started by DeanMk, Oct 24, 2012.

  1. DeanMk

    DeanMk Poulsbo, Wa. Active Member

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    Besides "perfect" balance, a personally fitted stock and a huge difference in purchase price, what's the difference between a competition trap gun and a regular ol' bird huntin' gun?


    Dean
     
  2. DieselScout

    DieselScout S Clackamas County Well-Known Member

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    Most of the trap gun I've shot had a much better trigger. By better, I mean lighter weight, less pull, no creep or over travel. They had a different point of aim, with a field gun I'd cover the bird with a trap gun the front bead would be just under the bird. Trap guns had longer barrels, 30 or more inches, high or double sight ribs and two sight beads.

    Shooting trap is all about getting the gun in the same place on your shoulder, getting the bird in the same sight picture to break it and knowing how to manage your lead. Trap specific guns help you do this with their improvements. However, there always seems to be some old guy on the line with a field grade model 12 that beats everyone. You can learn to shoot a field gun as good as a trap gun and have plenty of success with it. I shot a very basic Winchester 1300 recreationally and had a great time. I typically shot the same or better with a trap specific gun and had I wanted to drop the cash on one, I am sure my average would have went up. But I don't see owning one as a requirement. You shoot best with a gun you most comfortable and familiar with.
     
  3. DeanMk

    DeanMk Poulsbo, Wa. Active Member

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    So true!
    Thanks for the thorough response.


    Dean
     
  4. davemata

    davemata Spokane, WA Well-Known Member

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    Trap is great fun, I think though, that if you are going to take time out in the field, shoot trap with your field gun, and call it practice.

    The real shooting is when a bird is up, and destined for your freezer.

    What's really going to matter and make the most "difference" is that you shoot with a gun often enough to become intimately familiar with how it works. If you and that gun are like an extension of each other, then the only thing that matters is price tag and available shooting budget.
     
  5. DeanMk

    DeanMk Poulsbo, Wa. Active Member

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    Yeah, that's how I'm kinda looking at it and part of the reason for asking in the first place.
    Most compettion trap guns are singles but cost oodles of bucks.
    I got my H&R Topper for helping a guy move.
    I bird hunted for a number of years when I was a kid and in my experience, Trap is quite realistic.
    Thanks for a great response.



    Dean
     
  6. Starship

    Starship NE Portland Active Member

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    True trap guns are just for trap and not much use for anything else.

    One of the biggest differences is the point of impact. On a trap gun it is higher than the point of aim. Generally a trap target is always on the rise so if you shoot at it you really want the shot to arrive higher than aimed. With a non-trap gun you have to cover the clay (hence it is really out of your sight line when you shoot) in order to bring the shot in on a rising clay.
     
  7. DeanMk

    DeanMk Poulsbo, Wa. Active Member

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    Seems like that would make the Trap gun more adept to a hunting situation, like Pheasant.
    You'd never loose sight of the bird.


    Dean
     
  8. Swedish K

    Swedish K SW Washington Moderator Staff Member

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    Another difference on some of the high end trap guns is a better weight distribution. Many are weighted in the stock with lead or Mallory metal (about 55% heavier than lead) to give it a better balance. A well balanced shotgun points better/quicker making it easier to follow the bird. A friend was an alternate for the olympic team back in the 90s. His shotgun was a dream to shoot but I feel that the price tag would be better spent on a new truck or a decent shotgun with enough shells to shoot for years.
     
  9. DeanMk

    DeanMk Poulsbo, Wa. Active Member

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    Yes, the weight bias issue is something I've been dealing with for years now.
    I'd love to swap my 25"/20 ga. for a 32"/12 ga., but I've got a whole crate of 20 ga. shells. What do I do with those?!
    Unless you shoot 10 or 12 ga. everyone wants to offer only short "quick" barrels with their shotguns (I'm talking regular ol' shotguns, not competition guns).
    Especially with singles, this makes the gun very "whippy" and its actually harder to aim.
    As for repeating shots, I've never found an opportunity where the second shot was worth taking, so why carry all the extra baggage.


    Dean