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Todays aquisition....

Pete F

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My first problem to tackle is removing the oily dusty crud. I hate to even pick it up without gloves. I don't want to ruin the wood or metal by using a harsh chemical cleaner, so I am going slow starting with a diluted wood cleaner. Then I will tackle the metal.

I have used Numrich for many years. They are a great source for old hard to find parts.
 
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tac

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My first problem to tackle is removing the oily dusty crud. I hate to even pick it up without gloves. I don't want to ruin the wood or metal by using a harsh chemical cleaner, so I am going slow starting with a diluted wood cleaner. Then I will tackle the metal.

I have used Numrich for many years. They are a great source for old hard to find parts.

1. Kroil and BRONZE wool is your friend.

2. Wood likes Murphey's Saddle Soap - applied, them wiped off with paper kitchen towel/wipes. Watch Murphey of Murphey's muskets on Youtube 'cure' a Nepalese Martini.
 

Pete F

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1. Kroil and BRONZE wool is your friend.

2. Wood likes Murphey's Saddle Soap - applied, them wiped off with paper kitchen towel/wipes. Watch Murphey of Murphey's muskets on Youtube 'cure' a Nepalese Martini.
I have plenty of Kroil and bronze wool.

Do you use tung oil or linseed oil after the stock is dry? I understand that many old military stocks used tung or linseed oil to protect the stock. I don't want a shiny stock, but one closer to original. I can't remember what we used on our home sporterized Enfield that I still have - my first deer rifle, $5 at Sears. I couldn't find the video you suggested.
 

BSG 75

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Do you use tung oil or linseed oil after the stock is dry? I understand that many old military stocks used tung or linseed oil to protect the stock.
The US was the only country that used tung oil, and only on M1 (Garand) Rifle stocks. Other US rifles were finished with raw (not boiled) linseed oil, and other countries including Great Britain also used raw linseed oil. Raw linseed oil can be bought in grocery stores as flaxseed oil, a dietary supplement. Raw linseed oil is easier to apply and work with than boiled linseed oil (BLO) or pure tung oil. Be careful to avoid creating linseed oil soaked rags as they can spontaneously combust. I use only raw linseed oil or tung oil as appropriate for oil finishes.
 

tac

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Nailed above. Note that like a number of stock finishes, RLO needs warmth and friction to work into the grain of the wood. In my experience of refinishing fifty or so older stocks with it, bare hands are good. That way you can also feel when it start to 'drag' - stop at that point, hang it up and let it dry for at least 24 hours. Refinishing with the original-style finish is NOT a quick fix, so if you are expecting a wonder-finish in an evening you are going to be VERY disappointed. Figure on at least a week of evenings to get a good job done. Youtube is crammed with advice, better than mine, I'm sure.
 
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