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To cut or not to cut

Discussion in 'General Firearm Discussion' started by dolooper, Sep 8, 2011.

  1. dolooper

    dolooper Coast Range, or thereabouts Well-Known Member

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    So, I picked up a Marlin/Glenfield Model 25, mostly for my 10-year-old. I have to admit that part of it as about me, too. I had one when I was younger, and it's a great plinker that also shoots shorts if you want. It's a bolt-action, detachable magazine so it's a good platform for him to learn a typical hunting-type set up as well (he's interested in hunting).

    The problem is that I've got more gun stock than I've got boy. I'm thinking about cutting the stock down, but there are a couple problems with that. When he grows older or if he loses interest, new replacement laminate stocks are about $100 and it seems a bit extreme to put a $100 stock on a $100 dollar gun. I haven't seen any used stocks around on the usual places. Plus, if I cut it down, the buttplate'll be useless, though I can probably throw on a cheap aftermarket pad or something.

    I'm about 75% resigned to just cutting it down and replacing either the stock or getting another plinker for myself at a later date, but a small selfish part of me doesn't want to, I think because I have memories from years ago about this particular model.

    Thoughts? Recommendations?
     
  2. samuelm16

    samuelm16 se pdx Well-Known Member

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    you could always cut it now and when he grows drill a couple holes and use dowels to piece it back together and then just refinish it so the seam dissapears
     
  3. dolooper

    dolooper Coast Range, or thereabouts Well-Known Member

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    I'm liking that! Thanks.
     
  4. kenno

    kenno eastern WA Active Member

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    Cut the stock with a thin saw, save the butt plate and excess stock. Use a piece of hard fiberboard/plywood for the new butt plate, screw in place.
     
  5. orygun

    orygun West Linn Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

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    I've got to say I think that's a good idea.
    When I was younger Dad was teaching me to shoot with my grandpa's Marlin 22. I complained that the butt was too long and wanted Dad to cut it down to fit me. I would have to hold the butt stock under my arm pit to sight through the scope. Dad wouldn't do it, insisting that I would grow into the gun and it would fit me just fine.
    He was right. Within a few years I didn't have to do the under armpit hold, and a few more it fit me perfectly. I still have Grandpa's .22. Wouldn't trade it for the world and have grown to appreciate my Dad's thoughts on "growing into it".
    But, to do a nice job on a "sectioning" of the butt stock would be a great way to go about things. You should consider that if this kid turns out like many of us, he will want to hang onto the first gun he shot for his entire life. To have it fit him as he grows older could be very important.
     
  6. NuthinFancy

    NuthinFancy Seattle Area Active Member

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  7. jbett98

    jbett98 NW Oregon Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

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    Try running some wanted ads for a used stock. You never know what may pop up on this site or others like Outdoorstrader or Armslist. You might luck out and find a complete donor gun for cheap. Make the memories now, they grow up to fast. Be careful and have fun.
     
  8. hermannr

    hermannr Okanogan Highlands Well-Known Member

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    I have an old shotgun I inherited that was manufactured in 1903, so I am not sure who all the cuts and splices were made for, but it has been cut and spliced at least 4 times over the years. If it is not an expensive gun, and a plain wooden stock, I would have no problems cutting it back, and then adding it back as your boy grows. (maybe even is smaller pieces.

    Alternate: Laminate some wood, cut out the basic patern, and have your son carve his own stock.
     
  9. dolooper

    dolooper Coast Range, or thereabouts Well-Known Member

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    I like it a lot, too. If he's going to be shooting, I want reasonable technique to become second nature and reasonable technique starts with getting the butt firmly into the shoulder. He can get a sight picture (sort of) from a sitting position but it's more on his arm than shoulder and has no chance to get a good picture from prone (which is where I really want him so he can start grouping better).

    If I do this, he'll get something right-sized and it'll be kinda like marking his growth on the jamb of a door, except using the stock of a gun. It just means it won't fit me well for a while, but I need work on being a selfish SOB anyway. ;)

    That sound you hear this weekend will be me cutting the stock.

    Thanks, all.
     
  10. Mark W.

    Mark W. Silverton, OR Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

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    I did the replacement stock thing with my sons collectable Daisy Red Ryder BB gun. I made a simple slab sided stock to the proper pull and then added a cheek piece to the top of it so he got good cheek weld and a proper sight picture. Made a heck of a lot of difference and accelerated his shooting by at least 3 years. he is now a grown up 28 years old and has a really nice very collectable (read valuable) Daisy Red Ryder BB gun (and the little butt stock for hopefully his kids.
     
  11. BillyDa59

    BillyDa59 King County, WA Member

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    Good choice of gun btw. I'm 20 years old and bought a Marlin 25N just because I liked the idea of having a bolt action rifle that was super cheap to feed. I shoot it far more than any other gun I own.
     
  12. Ben Beckerich

    Ben Beckerich NW Oregon Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

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    you can also use a belt sander to trim a buttplate down to new dimensions. just set it on the new stock end, trace it out, and sand away. perfect.
     
  13. Simonpie

    Simonpie Portland Active Member

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    One option would be to make the splice piece removable. Inserts in the main stock for longish machine screws from the cut off pice. That way, you'll still see the seam, but it will look intentional, as those types of sporters are made for growing kids anyway. You can pretty up the splice with an accant shim like some shotgun butt pads have. Actually, I don't know why they don't come with a range of spacers to begin with. Somebody invent that!
     
  14. firstbassman

    firstbassman Southern Willamette Valley New Member

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    Is the current stock walnut, or hardwood? Go with what seems best to you, but I would opt for finding a beater replacement stock.
     
  15. sadiesassy

    sadiesassy Prescott Active Member

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    My father cut down the stock for me when I was young. Never could find the piece he cut off. So we made a piece to extend the stock - Matche up pretty nicely. Still use the gun today
     
  16. Deavis

    Deavis Mid Willamette Valley Active Member

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    CUT! use dowels to replace and glue when he gets older. In the mean time. Get a little chunk of scrap brass. Use the new profile of the butt as a guide and cut a brass buttplate. Secure with screws to what will be hardwood dowel epoxy holes in future.
     
  17. Deavis

    Deavis Mid Willamette Valley Active Member

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    Since youre cutting...... chop the barrel at 16"!
     
  18. MarkAd

    MarkAd Port Orchard Well-Known Member

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    Save a tree. Buy a cricket 22. cost you a 100 bucks. Then when your next one comes along you got it covered