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One thing I know about solo hikers is they are all about cutting excess oz's. And your Remington replica is like a boat anchor. This is one of those places where an alloy framed 22 mag pistol comes into its own. Even the ammo is light weight.
For about 30 years I owned a Ruger Single Six and a Heritage Rough Rider. The RR with a 4.75" barrel and the SS with a 5.5" barrel. The heritage was right at 9oz lighter than the SS. If I was just in and out of the truck, or on a tractor both carried about the same. But if I was on my feet all day [ moving irrigation pipe or hiking] that 9 oz became real . If you have a family member that will help you out the weight savings between the big BP pistol and a alloy 22 mag are significant! These days even Ruger sells an alloy framed gun. [ the wrangler].
For your purpose, shortest barrel will be the lightest weight. And even down to a 3" barrel is pretty easy to shoot well.
My backpacking days ended in the early 80's, but even then any threat was on two feet. Mostly near the trail heads and trading posts.
Be careful, people have goten more dangerous not less. DR
 

bbbass

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Just get yourself a 16" lever gun and a good sling.
I would NOT have liked to carry the weight and awkwardness of a lever gun in addition to my 50lb to 75lb backpack and harness. Tho with today's frameless backpacks, it would have been easy enough to strap it to the pack, but then it is not ready to go when needed.
 
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One thing I know about solo hikers is they are all about cutting excess oz's. And your Remington replica is like a boat anchor. This is one of those places where an alloy framed 22 mag pistol comes into its own. Even the ammo is light weight.
For about 30 years I owned a Ruger Single Six and a Heritage Rough Rider. The RR with a 4.75" barrel and the SS with a 5.5" barrel. The heritage was right at 9oz lighter than the SS. If I was just in and out of the truck, or on a tractor both carried about the same. But if I was on my feet all day [ moving irrigation pipe or hiking] that 9 oz became real . If you have a family member that will help you out the weight savings between the big BP pistol and a alloy 22 mag are significant! These days even Ruger sells an alloy framed gun. [ the wrangler].
For your purpose, shortest barrel will be the lightest weight. And even down to a 3" barrel is pretty easy to shoot well.
My backpacking days ended in the early 80's, but even then any threat was on two feet. Mostly near the trail heads and trading posts.
Be careful, people have goten more dangerous not less. DR
Unfortunately I have no family willing to help with the purchase of a modern design of handgun. That’s why I bought the conversion cylinder for my new army in the first place since it’s all I’ve got handgun wise.
 
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I would NOT have liked to carry the weight and awkwardness of a lever gun in addition to my 50lb to 75lb backpack and harness. Tho with today's frameless backpacks, it would have been easy enough to strap it to the pack, but then it is not ready to go when needed.
There are so many options to carry a rifle these days with packs, even if you want it at the ready but still bearing.
 

ilikegunspdx

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I’ve recently gotten into solo backpacking and was considering bringing my uberti reproduction 1858 Remington revolver with me. I have a conversion cylinder for it which allows me to load cartridges but only cowboy loads. I understand that it is far from the ideal choice for woods carry but I cannot purchase a legal handgun so this is all I’ve got. Would bringing it along be wise despite the reduced ability or just foolish?
View attachment 1202706
Not sure what you mean by reduced ability. 45 LC Cowboy loads produce about 350-400 ft lbs of energy which is roughly the same as 9mm or 45 acp. I have the same gun and it's very accurate. My first six shots with it shooting offhand in poor lighting.
2B05DD01-604A-4A7C-A732-9241752F25B6.jpeg
 
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Unfortunately I have no family willing to help with the purchase of a modern design of handgun. That’s why I bought the conversion cylinder for my new army in the first place since it’s all I’ve got handgun wise.
Then you are kind of stuck with what you have. The replicas are not ineffective, just heavy. Being a youngster will help make up for some extra weight. Just don't carry to much extra ammo, and leave the extra cylinder at home to lighten up some.
I shoot 160 gr bullets as plinking and small game loads for each extra bullet carried that would save 90 gr each over the 250 gr standard loads.
If you are interested in trying some you could probably get some from your local Cowboy Action Club. Do you reload?
One other thing about through hikers is they have a very loud minority that is against having a gun or even a big knife. I have told enough of them to pizz off, and other wise just ignore them. But I am not a teenager . If you want a sample of that look at sites and blogs that specialize in through hiking the AT or PC trails, and do a search for handguns on the trail. That will open your eyes! Good Luck DR
 
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Not sure what you mean by reduced ability. 45 LC Cowboy loads produce about 350-400 ft lbs of energy which is roughly the same as 9mm or 45 acp. I have the same gun and it's very accurate. My first six shots with it shooting offhand in poor lighting.
View attachment 1203712
By reduced I simply meant compared to other popular woods calibers like .44 mag, .357 mag, or full power 45LC
 

ilikegunspdx

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One thing I know about solo hikers is they are all about cutting excess oz's. And your Remington replica is like a boat anchor. This is one of those places where an alloy framed 22 mag pistol comes into its own. Even the ammo is light weight.
For about 30 years I owned a Ruger Single Six and a Heritage Rough Rider. The RR with a 4.75" barrel and the SS with a 5.5" barrel. The heritage was right at 9oz lighter than the SS. If I was just in and out of the truck, or on a tractor both carried about the same. But if I was on my feet all day [ moving irrigation pipe or hiking] that 9 oz became real . If you have a family member that will help you out the weight savings between the big BP pistol and a alloy 22 mag are significant! These days even Ruger sells an alloy framed gun. [ the wrangler].
For your purpose, shortest barrel will be the lightest weight. And even down to a 3" barrel is pretty easy to shoot well.
My backpacking days ended in the early 80's, but even then any threat was on two feet. Mostly near the trail heads and trading posts.
Be careful, people have goten more dangerous not less. DR
22 mag has massive losses in energy if using a short barrel. So much so that you can get comparable impact out of a regular 22lr pistol using good ammo. For example compare a 3" 22 mag to a 4" 22lr in the charts below. I own 22mag pistols with barrels varying from 1.5" all the way up to 16" and have seen this firsthand.

22lr also has an incredible number of options for the gun whereas 22mag is very limited. 22lr also has huge number of options for the ammo.

Also as a "woods gun" I would not use either 22lr or 22mag, they are simply too weak compared to other calibers.

Also isn't any discussion of any gun kind other than 45LC or 38 special irrelevant because the op has said he can only shoot black powder or black powder with conversion cylinder? ----Edit: just read your other post where you said something similar already above---

So that means his only 2 options for non BP are 45LC (.44 BP barrel) or 38 special (.36 BP barrel). As far as power 45LC will exceed 38 special by a lot. He has a gun that is one of the strongest for that type (full steel frame compared to open top revolvers I mean) so it lends itself well to shooting 45 LC.
04761236-2B68-49F9-BA17-FA87AF176058.jpeg
5FB67D4C-3A27-478B-9959-8BA250085126.jpeg
 
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bbbass

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There are so many options to carry a rifle these days with packs, even if you want it at the ready but still bearing.
That's fine... it just wouldn't have been for me... backpacking is all about how light you can get your pack while still carrying enough food/gear to live like lords.

I always had my fishing pole with me, a real one, not a breakdown backpack rod. And I've packed in an inflatable raft. But I never saw any reason to lug around a rifle. Can't see where you would put it that it wouldn't be in the way or adding additional burden to the shoulders. No thanx.
 

ilikegunspdx

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That's fine... it just wouldn't have been for me... backpacking is all about how light you can get your pack while still carrying enough food/gear to live like lords.

I always had my fishing pole with me, a real one, not a breakdown backpack rod. And I've packed in an inflatable raft. But I never saw any reason to lug around a rifle. Can't see where you would put it that it wouldn't be in the way or adding additional burden to the shoulders. No thanx.
Yea it would seem pretty bulky to me also. Smallest and lightest rifle I could think of would be that Chiapa wireframe stock 22 mag (can't remember name). Then a whole slug of 5-6 pounder rifles that could be broken down or folded including sub 2000 9mm or other rifles if adding a folding stock. Then true "scout" rifles (ala Col Cooper's original concept) which are over 6 lb. (but long because stock can't be folded).

Another somewhat oddball option in that size and weight range is a coach gun. They break down fairly small. 18" barrel and wide range of shotgun loads available. Also can use converters in a break barrel shotgun for 17hmr, 22lr, 22mag, 38 sp, 380 acp, 9mm, 45 acp, 45LC, 40 S&W. But the converters themselves are pretty heavy imo. Size wise an 18" barrel coach gun broken down will fit in a standard run of the mill small backpack.

All of these would seem too bulky to me personally (Chiappa gun would be ok weight wise) but if OP can legally own shotguns or rifles it might be an option.
 
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bbbass

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See my problem?

These were state of the art expensive North Face external frame packs. The weight is carried on the belt, the shoulder straps, and the chest strap. Nowadays, I think most packs used are internal frame models, and the weight is distributed in those areas plus along the spine.

1653148569537.jpeg


Wifey:
1653148614761.jpeg

1653148647375.jpeg
1653148702127.jpeg

Deschutes River (only carrying 35lbs here)
1653148774816.jpeg
 
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That's fine... it just wouldn't have been for me... backpacking is all about how light you can get your pack while still carrying enough food/gear to live like lords.

I always had my fishing pole with me, a real one, not a breakdown backpack rod. And I've packed in an inflatable raft. But I never saw any reason to lug around a rifle. Can't see where you would put it that it wouldn't be in the way or adding additional burden to the shoulders. No thanx.
Some hunt while back packing, one such option...
https://kifaru.net/store/accessories/gun-bearers/gun-bearers/
 

bbbass

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This is not back packing:
1653228484926.png

If you don't carry a bag, a tent, a cookstove, and several days worth of food, you aren't backpacking. THIS is one of their packs that would qualify:
1653228615299.png


Again, no thanx. If I was going to do that kind of a hunt, I would have a bush pilot fly me into a base camp. I think our OP wants to do more traditional backpacking, like going to the High Sierras, high Wallowa lakes, etc. I can just see all the summer granolas reaction to some dude carrying a lever gun instead of a fishing pole.
 

ilikegunspdx

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.
This is not back packing:
View attachment 1204852

If you don't carry a bag, a tent, a cookstove, and several days worth of food, you aren't backpacking. THIS is one of their packs that would qualify:
View attachment 1204855


Again, no thanx. If I was going to do that kind of a hunt, I would have a bush pilot fly me into a base camp. I think our OP wants to do more traditional backpacking, like going to the High Sierras, high Wallowa lakes, etc. I can just see all the summer granolas reaction to some dude carrying a lever gun instead of a fishing pole.
I don't know anything about OPs intentions re hiking but totally agree about other hikers likely view of seeing a gun. Contrast that with a regular hunting area where most people you see have guns. No one would think twice about it there.

But it depends on the person too. Someone hiking with a rifle may say " I don't give a F what another person thinks", and that's cool too IMO. Totally up to the individual. I've had idiots react negatively at me carrying a camera with long lens in wildlife areas Fe. I have no clue why they are offended. And frankly I could give a flying F ha ha. I've had people be offended at seeing someone driving a regular car in Portland. No kidding. I guess they expect all people to walk or ride a bike? Poeple will be offended at anything you do if you run into enough of them. So again up to the individual how much they want to take that into account.
 

bbbass

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.

I don't know anything about OPs intentions re hiking but totally agree about other hikers likely view of seeing a gun. Contrast that with a regular hunting area where most people you see have guns. No one would think twice about it there.

But it depends on the person too. Someone hiking with a rifle may say " I don't give a F what another person thinks", and that's cool too IMO. Totally up to the individual. I've had idiots react negatively at me carrying a camera with long lens in wildlife areas Fe. I have no clue why they are offended. I frankly I could give a flying F ha ha. I've had people be offended at seeing someone driving a regular car in Portland. No kidding. I guess they expect all people to walk or ride a bike? Poeple will be offended at anything you do if you run into enough of them. So again up to the individual how much they want to take that into account.
I agree.

Personally, I didn't need any hassle when I went up to high lakes. And leaving my rifle back at the tent while I went fishing would not be an option.

I had a few frowns at the revolver on my belt, and one or two asked why I was armed but it was never hard to handle. Carrying an AR might be a diff story... the "who gives a flying F what anybody thinks" only goes so far when the Rangers start giving you crap. I was up there to fish and enjoy the beauty, not purposely disturb the harmony.

Hunting season, diff thing entirely. No granolas in sight.
 

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