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Thoughts on dry firing???

Discussion in 'General Firearm Discussion' started by jtwebb, Jan 2, 2010.

  1. jtwebb

    jtwebb Corvallis New Member

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    Ok so I was wondering if there is any "real" ill affects of dry firing a weapon. I know in the Army we have to do a functions check after we disassemble and reassemble our weapons, which consists of dry firing the weapon several times to make sure all the functions are working correctly. This has become a habit of mine even with my personal firearms. I can't see how dry firing a weapon would have adverse affects on it, seeing that when you fire a weapon the huge amounts of pressure in the chamber and barrel do not damage the weapon, how would a dry fire be so terrible for it. The only reason I ask is because an older friend of mine who has a lot more knowledge than I do in the world of firearms says its the worst thing you can do to a gun besides cleaning and lubrication. What are your thoughts on the matter.

    P.S. Sorry for the novel!
     
  2. MarkSBG

    MarkSBG Beaverton Oregon Well-Known Member

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  3. badclam

    badclam willapa bay Sunny SW WA Active Member

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    Rimfires = never.
    Old revolver's with the pins on the hammer = never
    All other modern firearms are OK.
     
  4. terrylf72

    terrylf72 Portland, Oregon, United States Member

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    i never do.. Use a snap cap..
     
  5. TonsOfOregonBrass

    TonsOfOregonBrass Sandy, OR Active Member

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    I had to replace a mac 12 bolt from dry firing by my brother in law

    Dry firing = Never. Use Snap Caps.
     
  6. Wheeler44

    Wheeler44 SW Washington Member

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    Any military or faithful military pattern rifle can be dry fired safely..

    .22's never..you can use a 7/8" x#4-6 plastic wall anchor ( a small yellow plastic insert for screwing into dry wall) for a .22 snap cap.

    Get 'em at your local hardware store... A buck or two for a handful or so....Share 'em with your friends and neighbors....encourage folks to dryfire..

    W44
     
  7. MountainBear

    MountainBear Sweet Home, OR Well-Known Member

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    From a gunsmith's perspective, I'd say any gun with the exception of rimfires and older shotguns. Hammer mounted firing pins shouldn't be an issue. I've dry fired my model 67 S&W several thousand times working on trigger control. No issues. The problem with rimfires is the fact that the firing pins are often chisel shaped. Without a F.P. stop, the pin rams into the edge of the chamber creating a burr that makes problems with extraction and feeding.
     
  8. KENOC

    KENOC Portland area Member

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    All it should do on modern firearms is wear them out quicker in the same way as they wear a little every time you live fire. Certainly dry firing should not wear the gun out any quicker than live firing it.
     
  9. PhysicsGuy

    PhysicsGuy Corvallis, OR Resident Science Nut

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    Several modern centerfire firearms have issues with dry firing, the main one I can think of is the CZ-75b. This takes quite a few dry fires to cause a problem, but since the firing pin does not hit anything to slow it down, it hits up against part of the firing pin block (IIRC), eventually causing a breakage.

    My rule is every once in a while is alright, but if I'm going to be doing a lot of dry firing, I use snap caps.
     
  10. theLEMband

    theLEMband Southeast WA Member

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    Remember to count your dry firing (with or without snap caps) when considering the maintenance on replacing the trigger/hammer springs.
     
  11. Throckmorton

    Throckmorton Florence,Ore ah gone Well-Known Member

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    Aside from possible damage to the gun,which can happen,you are just ASKING for an ND when you dry fire.I think dry firing is something to be avoided unless at a range or in the field with a good backstop....'just in case'.
    How else would so many people get shot with 'unloaded' guns?
     
  12. JAFO

    JAFO OR, USA Silver Supporter Silver Supporter

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    I wouldn't own a gun that couldn't handle dry firing.
     
  13. PhysicsGuy

    PhysicsGuy Corvallis, OR Resident Science Nut

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    Do you own a .22? :paranoid:
     
  14. JAFO

    JAFO OR, USA Silver Supporter Silver Supporter

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    None that can't be dry fired without fear of damage.
     
  15. badclam

    badclam willapa bay Sunny SW WA Active Member

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    Throckmorton
    People get shot accidentally by so called "unloaded guns"because some idiot points the gun at them or in their general direction when it is in fact "loaded". If you are not yet confident in your ability to unload a weapon and check it for a chambered round,you should not even clean a weapon without having someone else who is "qualified" to unload it for you first.....'just in case'. And even after a qualified person has unloaded your weapon for you,still keep it pointed in a safe direction, please.
    Do you think trigger adjustments and gunsmithing should only be done at the range?
    Do you think it is foolhardy to look down the bore of a used rifle before you buy it?
    I believe there was a certain firearm skill and safety level assumed here.
    I believe the assumption here was that if you dry fired the weapon it would be unloaded and pointed in a safe direction.
    I don't think this thread had anything to do with basic firearm safety but rather was about damaging the weapon itself.
    I have most of my triggers on my rifles,and some of my pistols set quite light. Because of this, if I let someone else shoot one of my rifles,I make them dry fire it first so they know how it breaks before there is a live round in the weapon.
     
  16. motoman98

    motoman98 Gresham, OR Active Member

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    I believe the CZ-52 has a firing pin problem with dry firing, too.
     
  17. Wheeler44

    Wheeler44 SW Washington Member

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    A good practice indeed.
     
  18. Gunner3456

    Gunner3456 Salem Well-Known Member

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    And those would be what? :paranoid:
     
  19. Wheeler44

    Wheeler44 SW Washington Member

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    The manual for the Ruger 10-22 and the Ruger mark 3 both state that they have a firing pin stop and are safe to dry fire.....

    Firing pin stops can fail after repeated dry firing....

    7/8"X#4-6 plastic wall anchors are cheap insurance against a dinged up chamber...
    W44
     
  20. BooKilla

    BooKilla Portland, OR Member

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    The general consensus from LEO's is that snap caps are great for live fire drills. They are great tools for clearing malfunctions, but not for dry firing at home. Many people, including Officers, have delimbed themselves by getting used to drying firing with snap caps. Despite our better judgement, everyone gets confused at some point without knowing they are confused. If you get used to firing a gun with something in the chamber or cylinder, the chances are greater that it will be a live round. Most people say "No never, not me", but yes you. If you're going to dry fire with snap caps, the range is a great place.