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Thinking about buying another press

Discussion in 'Ammunition & Reloading' started by IheartGUNS, Apr 13, 2012.

  1. IheartGUNS

    IheartGUNS WaCo Well-Known Member

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    So I have a progressive press already, but I'm thinking of getting a single stage press or a turret type press. What's your thoughts of each press? What are the +/- with either press?

    Thanks in advance
     
  2. Mark W.

    Mark W. Silverton, OR Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

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    A steel press will last longer then an aluminum one. Both need to be lubricated. An aluminum press is less money then a steel press. The more complicated the arm is typically the less effort it takes to operate (especially advantagous when doing larger magnum type rifle cases) Some people like Red others prefer Green.

    They all work. I think you will find most people have experiance with one brand of press since most of them last a life time if taken care of. My RCBS 3 has been cranking out everything from .9mm to 30-06 for over 25 years. I expect my son to have it on his bench some day.
     
  3. trixter

    trixter Giles County Member

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    I have a (Loaned to me) RCBS A3, on which I think I can relaod tank ammo LOL. big, heavy but accurate as can be. I also have a Lee Loadmaster for 45 acp and I have a second turret for quick-change to .223. and a Lee Reloader press that I use to size bullets. Each has its own job.
     
  4. Dunerunner

    Dunerunner You'll Never Know Well-Known Member

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    RCBS.....period!
     
  5. lostbackpacker

    lostbackpacker marysville,wa Member

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    second that for single stage press
     
  6. deadshot2

    deadshot2 NW Quadrant WA State Well-Known Member

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    As always, it's going to depend on what you are going to load on this single stage. If it's just to load a few rounds of Hunting or Target ammo, then look at Lee, RCBS, Lyman, or Hornady single stage presses. Pick the one you like and fits your budget. Turrrets are nice but if all you're looking for is a sturdy singe stage, a Lee or Hornady with their quick change die systems are fine.

    If you're looking to load super accurate, precision, ammo and you want minimal variations in concentricity of the load, etc, then look at a Forster Co-Ax press. You'll also want to be very discriminating on what dies you use, even to the point of using specialty dies that utilize an arbor press. They make the most perfect ammo of all but are also the slowest.

    It all depends on what you want your press to do. At one end of my bench I have a Dillon XL650 which I use to mass produce good ammo at measured rates of up to 1,000 rounds per hour. At the other end of my bench is a 30+ year old RCBS II press that gives me as close to perfect ammo as one can get from threaded dies and I don't care how fast it is.
     
  7. IheartGUNS

    IheartGUNS WaCo Well-Known Member

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    Well I want to start reloading 308, 223 (basically rifle). So I think a single stage press is best, right?
     
  8. james2562

    james2562 Kent Member

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    I have read a lot of good things about Forster Co-Ax press. Looking at it from an engineering point of view its design is VERY GOOD. It also has a nice clean drop for primers. But at $275 it costs double what other GOOD presses cost. For myself I cant justify the additional cost but if you can.............

     
  9. BANE

    BANE Battle Ground WA. Well-Known Member

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    I just bought a RCBS rock chucker master kit.
    I wanted one to load ammo I don't shoot as often.
    500s&w ,45-70 ,300wm ,44mag. ,45lc. ,7mmrm. Ect.
    My thoughts is its alot easer to swap calibers then my Dillon XL650.
    And I only want to load a few at a time or experimental loads.

    I use the Dillon for my 223/ 5.56, 9mm, 40s&w, 45acp, Ect.
     
  10. Gatesbox

    Gatesbox San Carlos/Bend New Member

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    I lovemy old single stage press... I think it is an old Lyman, most of the time I have it set up with a universal depriming die. Great for popping out primers on whatever is in the bucket, and when I need it for an odd caliber or two...
     
  11. deadshot2

    deadshot2 NW Quadrant WA State Well-Known Member

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    I've always thought they were best for a beginner. You'd be amazed at how much ammo you can produce on a single stage once you get the hang of it. I loaded 50 rounds of .308 yesterday in less than an hour and I wasn't even pushing it.. Yes, I was using prepped brass, sized, trimmed, and primed, in previous sessions but it's merely a matter of 1/2 hour here and 1/2 hour there to prep a bunch of cases. The decision to "move up" to a progressive will be dictated by how many rounds you actually load.

    Even those reloaders that start with a progressive eventually own a single stage so why not just start with one, learn the hobby well, and move up when your ready. Those that do usually have fewer problems with their progressives I might add.
     
  12. orygun

    orygun West Linn Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

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    A friend has a RockChucker. Good press, but I prefer a turret style. I have an older Lyman Spar-T.
    The advantage that I really like is the fact that I can set up all of the dies for the caliber I'm loading. I can even mount the powder measure if I want to, but I don't. When I've run all of the shells through the sizing/decapping die, I simply turn the head to the next die.
    While I use my Dillon 550 for almost everything, handgun and practice rifle ammo, I use the Lyman for all of my hunting ammo.
     
  13. speedtriple

    speedtriple Vancouver, Washington, United States Member

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    Depends on what you are doing with your 308 and 223. If you are going to be shooting long distance and want super accurate ammo, then yes a single stage press or arbor press is what you want. But if you are loading for short range, more rapid fire, semi auto ammo, then most progressive presses can do a great job.

    I load my 308 stuff on a single stage for long distance shooting. I load most of my .223 stuff in lots of 250-1000 for practical rifle use on a progressive press.
     
  14. FarmerTed1971

    FarmerTed1971 Portland, Oregon, United States Well-Known Member

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    Rockchucker
    /thread
     
  15. zdogk9

    zdogk9 Pacific County New Member

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    rock chucker or Forester.
     
  16. AMProducts

    AMProducts Maple Valley, WA Jerk, Ammo Manufacturer Silver Supporter

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    For the cartridges you're thinking of loading, you may want to look at the RCBS Partner press, I bought one many years ago, and when I finally got around to trading up to a rock chucker, I had a few issues (my big hands made it tough to get the shells in and out) so I bought another partner, and got lucky and traded my RC for an RCBS A4 Bigmax.

    From the presses I've used, the RC is a great press, but if you're loading the longer cartridges like .30-06 it can be tough to get the rounds in and out, the A3 which has a slightly longer stroke is a bit better. The partner is the cheapest of the RCBS presses and is a nice and easy to use O-type press, I highly recommend it.
     
  17. Gunner3456

    Gunner3456 Salem Well-Known Member

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    I do like the Lee Classic Turret press, but not their progressive. The progressive flexes too much for me except on basic pistol cartridges.

    I have two Lee Classic Turret presses and I have turrets for each caliber. Caliber swaps are a snap. I don't have to readjust my dies when I change over, just the powder measure.

    I think it's very good up to .223/5.56. They do sell a riser for the powder measure for those rifle rounds for about $10. I don't believe it will "easily" load rounds bigger than that but I do it sometimes.

    I will admit there are bigger and stronger and more expensive presses, but I'm completely happy with those Lees. They are steel, not aluminum.

    I do have a couple of single stage presses. One is totally dedicated to punching out mil primers and swaging the pockets. I don't need anything fancy for that. The other I often use for large rifle calibers of which I load and shoot fewer.

    Whatever I chose, single stage is simply way too slow for me for actual reloading. I typically buy and/or tumble at least 2k brass and load that many before I switch over. A good progressive is faster but you need to really concentrate non-stop. A turret is slower but much faster than single stage. They also may be a lot stronger because at least on mine the shell holder is on top of the ram, where the progressive I had put the shells on the outer edge of a carousel.

    That flex may only be true in the Lee. I haven't had a Dillon or other brand and know nothing about them. Others here will know.

    This would take you a long ways toward reloading. I'd want some more turrets - one for each caliber but I could add those over time. Be sure to look at both pictures to see what you get. LINK