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There are no "dumb" ideas..........planting

Discussion in 'Preparedness & Survival' started by coctailer, Feb 15, 2011.

  1. coctailer

    coctailer Portland, OR/Hastings, MI/Vancouver,WA I run with scissors.

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    That is how I justify my "dumb" idea.:laugh::laugh:

    Find a secret spot in the woods and plant huckleberrys, apple trees, whatever grows wild in the PNW with zero tending needed.

    Secret bug-out food storage?
     
  2. swoop

    swoop Milwaukie, Oregon Well-Known Member

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    The deer will love you.:laugh:
     
  3. deadeye

    deadeye Albany,OR. Moderator Staff Member

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    Doubles as a feed plot for the deer so you have meat to go with the berries and apples. I just plan on staying put with apple, pear, cherry, and plum trees on my place.
     
  4. The Cheese

    The Cheese somewhere special Member

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    huckleberries are a rather finicky plant, plus they need to be up high. Red huckleberries are pretty much everywhere out in the coast range. There is a weird blue type that I have found, but unless they are in full sun (very rare) their berries taste terrible. But yeah, I have though about doing the same thing behind my house on the metro land. Its already over run with blackberry patches, just need a bunch of miners lettuce (if it will grow here) and some other low key food stuffs. I really need to just go take one of those wild foods classes. But really you'd be amazed at how many plants there are on the sides of roads and in vacant land that you can eat. Heck, just let the dandelions take over your yard and you can eat good for you greens all summer long.
     
  5. coctailer

    coctailer Portland, OR/Hastings, MI/Vancouver,WA I run with scissors.

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    And with BBQ Sauce, I will love them as well.:bluelaugh:
     
  6. DirtyBird

    DirtyBird Milwaukie Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

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    I think this is an awesome idea. If I'm not mistaken, I think some hunter gatherer tribes used/use this approach to supplement their diet.

    It's been embraced by some parts of the hippie / urban homesteading set as well. Google yourself up 'seed bombing' or 'guerrilla gardening' for some pretty useful information.

    Garden carefully though. I was all set to seed bomb some abandoned land near my house, until I learned how polluted it is.
     
  7. powersbj

    powersbj Seattle Area Active Member

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    I think this approch is called permaculture....
     
  8. PBinWA

    PBinWA Clark County Well-Known Member

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    Better get started. Fruit trees can take a long time to get going and the deer are **** on them when the trees are young. I've got 7 year old Apple trees that are just starting to produce. I have had good luck with Frost Peaches and Cherry trees. Otherwise, it seems to be hit and miss from year to year. Weather, location, and knowledge all play a huge part in getting successful fruit trees.
     
  9. olydemon

    olydemon Olympia Active Member

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    Man I could feed an army then.... Wife always wants me to kill them, but I keep trying to tell her that they are good eating...
     
  10. CIPuyleart

    CIPuyleart La Center, WA Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

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    With some cherries or huckleberries growing, you can let some wild ferment a little and then make some killer BBQ sauce!

    That's no BS...I planted three apple trees 1-1/2 yr ago and all they've done is become deer food. I can't keep the deer away from them (need to try a fence next). I'm half tempted to get a bow and use the trees as bait this next fall...

    I grew up in the mountains of N. Idaho...nothing beats the big purple huckleberries growing up there. Except maybe the bears that are eating those berries!
     
  11. Silver Fox

    Silver Fox Puyallup, WA Well-Known Member

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    Many of your older homes had fruit trees to the south of the house, provides shade in the winter and when the leaves fall allows the sun through. I know my grandmother has used every trick in the book to keep the deer away from her roses. She gave up two years ago. Any unattended plants or veggies will be fair game for the deer, need to post a century on a roaming and random foot patrol through out the evening. If you stay on a predicted path at a predicted time the deer will figure it out and know when to eat. Irritating isn't it?

    SF-
     
  12. PBinWA

    PBinWA Clark County Well-Known Member

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    Regular sprinkling of Blood Meal seems to work well for keeping the deer away from plants and flowers - of course then I need to use the shock collar to keep the dogs away. ;)

    Three T-posts ~ 2-3 feet apart in a triangle and some chicken wire will help keep the deer away from the young trees. Doesn't look great but it works.

    I've got 8 year old plums that haven't done anything yet. Some trees take a long time before they become productive. I planted most of my trees around 8 years ago and they are just starting to get going. I spray them occasionally and have had some die from disease.

    These guys have a good variety of NW hardy fruit, nut, and berry plants: Raintree Nursery, fruit, nut and berry plants for the American fruit grower

    Look for stuff that is "known" good in the NW.
     
  13. Blitzkrieg

    Blitzkrieg WA Well-Known Member

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  14. Riot

    Riot Benton County, Washington Well-Known Member

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    Try potatos...I threw in some reds in my back yard and they grew like wildfire. It would take deer a little bit more effort to dig out potatos than all that top growing stuff.
     
  15. marty8587

    marty8587 NE Portland Active Member

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    I have had my secret spots for oyster mushrooms and chanterelles, and it can get alittle dicey when someone else thinks it's thier secret spot.
     
  16. Blitzkrieg

    Blitzkrieg WA Well-Known Member

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    Same here.. I am still harvesting mine here in mid Feb of the next year. They can survive winters and even hoarfrost. If you leave the little guys that are less than 1 inch diameter you will be assured of continuing crops.. be sure to add compost on top every few years in the spring. Your harvesting during the winter is enough dirt turning for the year. Curry, potato soup, casseroles and french fries all fall, winter and into early spring MMMM

    I do have to keep my Rotties away, they love potatoes (we always share leftovers in their meals) but of course they don't know they cannot digest the uncooked ones
     
  17. MuddyWatters

    MuddyWatters West Seattle Member

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    Cool idea. Garlic, oregano and chives should perennialize and give you some spice options and offer a little deer protection (well, not the oregano but that will flavor from the inside). Asparagus and artichoke may also work depending on your location.
     
  18. The Cheese

    The Cheese somewhere special Member

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    Same here we would always go pick huckleberries in the summer when we were camping. The ones in ID were great. I have had some red ones that were really really good from the coast range, but not quite the same. Again they need the full sun and all that. Last couple years have been crap up on hood for the huckleberries, but I need to find new grounds to pick this year.
     
  19. OPAWY

    OPAWY NorthCentral Wyoming Member

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    I think "permaculture" idea is a good one. Didn't know that's what its called.