Quantcast
  1. Sign up now and join over 35,000 northwest gun owners. It's quick, easy, and 100% free!

The Ruger 10/22 $$ Phenomenon

Discussion in 'General Firearm Discussion' started by Otis, May 11, 2010.

  1. Otis

    Otis Vancouver, WA Member

    Messages:
    137
    Likes Received:
    2
    This could just be me but it seams like used ruger 10/22 are going for rediculous amounts of cash. What I mean is that I have seen these fun little plane jane USED 22's go for $50 more USED than you can find them on sale a Bi-Mart or Big5 BRAND NEW. I dont think I have seen one for sale for less than $200 on any site. And then if you add a $100 barrel and stock kit to it that automatically makes it go for $400.:nuts:

    What am i missing?

    Anyone else out there see this happening?

    Please don't get me wrong, I do not see this as a bad thing, in fact I am thinking about making a few bucks too. I totally understand that price is relative to what it is worth to that person, i.e. if they like that particular stock set up and the few add-ons then why not ask top dollar and see what happens.

    I am just curious if anyone out there has actually made money on selling a used 10/22.

    :huh:Confused in the Couv:huh:
    Otis
     
  2. t.huynh

    t.huynh vancouver, wa Active Member

    Messages:
    909
    Likes Received:
    198
    I have noticed the same thing..I actually first came on here to look for a 10/22 for around 100 bucks lol. But yeah that didn't happen.
     
  3. Ian1816

    Ian1816 Oregon City Active Member

    Messages:
    439
    Likes Received:
    36
    I regularly see 10/22's listed for $50 over what Bi Mart sells them for. I just wonder how many of those sellers actually get full asking price. Maybe they figure if they price them high to start they will get a better price in the end.
     
  4. PhysicsGuy

    PhysicsGuy Corvallis, OR Resident Science Nut

    Messages:
    4,132
    Likes Received:
    155
    They may have bought them at a dealer, which can charge up to $100 over bimarts price. Just a guess.
     
  5. Otis

    Otis Vancouver, WA Member

    Messages:
    137
    Likes Received:
    2
    $100 is not unreasonable, correction, it use to be unreasonable and now it is a joke. Just a year and a half ago I purchased (2) 10/22 for $250 and one of them was the stainless model. I bet that if i posed a plane jane USED 10/22 on here for $175, which is what I think Bi-Mart was selling them for last month, it would go in less than 10 minuets.
     
  6. t.huynh

    t.huynh vancouver, wa Active Member

    Messages:
    909
    Likes Received:
    198
    No paper trail :p Maybe I should try putting up my plain jane 10/22 for 350 :thumbup:
     
  7. smithmax

    smithmax here Member

    Messages:
    382
    Likes Received:
    10
    I have a friend who sold his stainless 10/22 for $350 with a cheap scope. I think a lot of the buyers haven't done their research.
     
  8. Dyjital

    Dyjital Albany, Ore Flavorite Member Bronze Supporter

    Messages:
    4,907
    Likes Received:
    5,856
    I can't see myself buying one of those overpriced 10/22's that have been listed on here.

    I guess some peeps think that they are worth more than a new one????

    I can understand one that's been modified with internals, barrel, stock, good scope, bipod etc. but not what has been on here lately.
     
  9. toolfan

    toolfan North Portland Member

    Messages:
    180
    Likes Received:
    2
    A lot of people believe the older metal trigger guard models are worth more than a new in the store model.
     
  10. Gunner3456

    Gunner3456 Salem Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    5,109
    Likes Received:
    835
    You couldn't run fast enough to give me a new 10/22, nor could you buy my mint mid-70's version.

    Differences? The new ones have a plastic mag release, plastic trigger, plastic trigger guard, plastic trigger plunger, and plastic barrel band on the front of the stock/barrel.

    The guns are no longer polished and blued. They have a rough "applied" finish.

    The stocks are no longer maple. They are either softer poplar, or they are made of imported and ugly who-knows-what wood. You are likely to find defects and even knots in the wood.

    The triggers now suck. What did they expect with all of the plastic parts?

    IF I was going to offer my mint 70's example (which is never,) you'd cough up $400 or it would stay in the safe.

    $.02
     
  11. guitarguy

    guitarguy Longview, WA Silver Supporter Silver Supporter

    Messages:
    1,289
    Likes Received:
    516
    Gunner you are exactly right.
    Ruger has changed the 10/22 and for a lot of folks it seems that the cost cutting has not improved the breed.
    These guns last a LONG time and and "old" 10/22 has a lot of life in it especially since parts can be swaped so easily.
    Many people want the all metal version with a real stainless barrel rather than the silver paint and polymer trigger group.
    The blue one looks normal but the trigger group is also polymer and even though that may turn out to be as tough as the Ruger alloy trigger group, right now its not a desirable feature.
    The older ones are definitely commanding a premium.
    Think of it as the same as the "pre '64" model 94 Winchester when they tried to save money and created an instant classic in older guns.
    Just my 2 cents.
     
  12. Cougfan2

    Cougfan2 Hillsboro, OR Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,792
    Likes Received:
    597
    I have an early 70's 10/22 that I will never sell. That was when they still put walnut stocks on them. I have put thousands of rounds thru that rifle and it still shoots like a champ.
     
  13. Gunner3456

    Gunner3456 Salem Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    5,109
    Likes Received:
    835
    I forgot to add that I would never buy an new one even for $169 or whatever the sales price is. I'd much sooner pay $129 for a Marlin 60.

    That said, you still can't beat the Remington Nylon 66 or 77, a really nice example costing maybe $300 now. Imho that's the best $300 semi auto .22lr rifle ever made. Talk about dependable, long lived, accurate and sweet shooting. They will also eat anything for ammo. I wore one of those out at 100 thousand + + rounds but still have another "new" one in the safe. I believe I paid about $80 for it in the early-mid 70's.
     
  14. Gunner3456

    Gunner3456 Salem Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    5,109
    Likes Received:
    835
    That's a find. I don't recall every seeing a walnut stock - just maple. That must be one sweet gun. :thumbup:
     
  15. parsons_12b

    parsons_12b LaPine Oregon Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,070
    Likes Received:
    70
    I would not trade my nylon 66 for several 10/22s. The 10/22 is a nice rifle but my nylon 66 just shoots and feels perfect.

     
  16. Gunner3456

    Gunner3456 Salem Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    5,109
    Likes Received:
    835
    Yep. Once you've had one, you can't go back. I've had several friends shoot mine and immediately go on a quest to find one. Pawn shops, gunbroker... whatever it takes. Sweeeet trigger, accurate as heck, light weight, durable, no FTF, virtually weather proof - it's just the perfect combo.
     
  17. Cougfan2

    Cougfan2 Hillsboro, OR Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,792
    Likes Received:
    597
    It wasn't a find when I bought it. I am the original owner. I bought the gun (well my Dad bought it) when I was 16. At that time they even made one with a full length walnut mannlicher (sp?) stock that I really wanted, but my Dad talked me out of it. I wish he hadn't as if you are lucky enough to even find one now they command big bucks.
     
  18. swoop

    swoop Milwaukie, Oregon Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,079
    Likes Received:
    281
    Bought one with walnut stock in the early 70's at Larry's sporting goods OC. shopping center (now Fishermens) for $49.95 still have it, shoots great, but has always liked those CCI mini mags best. $$$
     
  19. Mookie

    Mookie Eastern Washington Active Member

    Messages:
    188
    Likes Received:
    30
    Many guns and gun parts are plastic. It is being proven that polymer is a stronger, lighter and better than metal on many parts of the rifle. Not saying that is the same quality as ruger is using, but so what. Better is better.

    The stocks have NEVER been maple except for a very select few. They were solid walnut until the mid 70's then switched to birch. There are still walnut stocks being made in the form of special editions and the DSP. The birch has always sucked but it is a good hardwood that EVERY manufacturer uses except higher priced guns

    Ruger triggers have always sucked.
     
  20. Gunner3456

    Gunner3456 Salem Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    5,109
    Likes Received:
    835
    I have never seen a good plastic trigger group. Maybe a trigger guard is OK, but not the crisp, metal working parts.

    My early-mid 70's is maple. I can't speak for the others of that era. The new ones are the very soft poplar or an unnamed imported wood and you can see and feel the low quality.

    The metal finishes are now rough and "applied" meaning painted on. They no longer polish and blue the guns.

    I stand pat. The quality has dropped off. I can't favorably compare the new ones with the earlier ones.