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The el cheapo 2-brick stove

Discussion in 'Preparedness & Survival' started by soberups, Aug 9, 2010.

  1. soberups

    soberups Newberg Well-Known Member

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    A key to survival during any long-term SHTF scenario will be the ability to boil water for cooking, washing, sanitation and to make it potable if your normal water source becomes contaminated or stops working.

    Its easy enough to boil water on a propane stove or cooker, but once your propane runs out you are back to square one.

    Just for kicks and giggles I "fabricated" this little outdoor stove using nothing but a couple of large cinder-block bricks and the upper warming grill from my barbeque. For fuel I used nothing but a handful of kindling-sized scraps from an old pallet that I had laying around. I was able to get the water to a rolling boil in about 5 minutes.

    The beauty of using the bricks is that the holes in the sides allow for good airflow, and you can add wood to the fire as needed from the sides instead of having to remove the water and grill in order to add from the top.

    You can pick the bricks up almost anywhere for $2 apiece. And you can stack and arrange them as needed to make the stove bigger if you need to heat a larger volume of water in a stock pot or pressure cooker.

    This beats the heck out of using your woodstove because its much more efficient in terms of the amount of wood needed. Even an apartment dweller could do this in their parking lot or carport, using whatever scrap wood they can find.

    Cheap, low-tech, reliable and effective is the way to go if the SHTF!

    stove2.jpg
     
  2. cyborg

    cyborg Oregon City Active Member

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    That seems to be a good field expedient way to go. I wonder about the strength of the concrete in the block when subjected to several fires? Maybe it would crack or even shatter. Seems that you could do the same thing with two big stones for free. Seems that the open holes on the blocks letting air in might not always be so desirable especially if it is windy.

    Bottom line for me.... if I have some around I would likely use them but I would not buy some just for this purpose.
     
  3. trainsktg

    trainsktg Portland OR Well-Known Member

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    That's a pretty neat idea. I'll have to give that a try.

    Keith
     
  4. soberups

    soberups Newberg Well-Known Member

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    As long as the concrete is allowed to heat and cool at a gradual rate it should be fine. I think the only danger would be if it were already very hot and you spilled cold water on it.

    I have tried using 2 or 3 big stones while camping; you can "sort of" make it work as long as you are only trying to heat up a small amount of water. But if you are trying to bring 5 or 10 gallons to boil in a big stock pot you really do need a flat and stable surface to place it on as well as room underneath for an adequate supply of fuel, and square bricks are ideal for this purpose.

    The open holes dont have to be an issue on windy days as long as you orient the direction of the bricks so that the holes are at right angles to the wind. You can then block the opening between the bricks with another brick or a piece of wood to serve as a windbreak.
     
  5. kenno

    kenno eastern WA Active Member

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    OK we got the Barby now where's the shrimp?
     
  6. cyborg

    cyborg Oregon City Active Member

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    YEs that is a great idea for a large pot. I like it.