The begining of the end of the prison industry?

Discussion in 'Off Topic' started by OutlawHoss, Aug 20, 2016.

  1. OutlawHoss

    OutlawHoss
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  2. Stomper

    Stomper
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    Don't get all euphoric about it, it's just making way for much more cost effective government run re-education camps. Each inmate will only cost the government .35 -.45 cents.... once. o_O
     
  3. OutlawHoss

    OutlawHoss
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    See, that's what I'm saying!
     
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  4. IheartSig

    IheartSig
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    If you are all for "indigent individuals" being caught committing crimes, arrested, released then skipping out and stack piling charges until they rack up enough for a prison sentence that you'll help pay for, this is great!
     
  5. OutlawHoss

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    That's already happening around here. I don't possess any great insight or critique of the private prison system. But I don't think the Feds have some inherent integrity and infallibility that will lead to a better system than the private system, I just appreciate it when things get changed up. In a world of entrenched entropic systems, dramatic upheaval tends to be the only opportunity for change; the downside is there is nothing to guarantee the quality of the outcome.
     
  6. Brutus57

    Brutus57
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    Cheaper if they use steel case TULA.....:rolleyes:

    Brutus Out
     
  7. OutlawHoss

    OutlawHoss
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    Of course, that's the beauty of the soviet era: the efficiency of tyranny. The USSR and the USA have taught each other that well.
     
  8. IheartSig

    IheartSig
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    There are no private prisons in Oregon, thankfully.

    The Feds recently said they were going to put an end to Private Prisons as well, but what they actually meant is "We are no longer going to utilize Private Prisons to house Federal Offenders"

    This basically means that the Feds are going to be taking more money earmarked for other things and utilize it to house the sudden influx themselves. They just wrote themselves a fat check and who holds the federal system in check for abuses?

    Protecting "Indigent" people from high bail, depending on how strict or loose the guidelines are is kind of ridiculous. It WILL help a few, but in reality all they are doing is creating a revolving door for pre trial detention. Expect resource and manpower to be stretched thin while the number of dipbubblegums on the street breaking laws grows exponentially if they are serious and not just paying lip service.

    Another point I would like to make is the issue of what constitutes a "flight risk". It is perhaps ironic that those least likely to jump bail are the ones who can afford to pay it. They have the most to lose.

    Transversely, tell me please how arresting jimmy the crack head and releasing him because he has no job, no money and no address is going to be beneficial? The exact type of person that probably NEEDS to land in jail for a while?

    Here is another point, more often than not for petty crimes, offenders are released after trial with time served, fine, restitution, community service what have you. The time spent in jail goes towards what ever sentence they would have received usually.

    Now I am concerned that what's actually happening here, or a consequence of said decision is, that people will be stacking charges and be given higher sentences that bump them to state level instead of a shorter county stay and out.

    Either way, the additional costs associated with this fall on us.
     
  9. old11bravo

    old11bravo
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    It is an absolute true fact that privatized "for profit" prisons are less safe and less effective than government run prisons. Believe it! Why would a "for profit" prison have any interest in reducing recidivism in prisons? They want the offenders to keep committing crimes and returning to their facilities so that they can line their fat pockets with the money that taxpayers and government pay them to house these derelicts. It also cost money to implement programming and training to reduce offender recidivism. That money is way better off in the pockets of the fat cats at the top rather than being spent trying to teach criminals how to reintegrate into society successfully.

    And why waste money paying corrections professionals a decent wage and providing costly training? Just throw a living, breathing person in there to do the job nobody else wants to do. Let the corrections employees in privatized prisons supplement their low paying jobs by bringing in contraband to earn extra cash. Their benefits package can be obtained through having their way with the offenders. The bottom line is saving money so that it can be better put to use in the accounts of the few at the top of the food chain in private prisons.

    Privatized prisons and corruption are synonymous with each other. Thank god Washington State, like Oregon, does not utilize "for profit" prisons. Government run prisons are held much more accountable for responsible use of tax payer money than private prisons. The Washington State Department of Corrections is at the cutting edge, and leads the nation in studying and utilizing practices and programs that reduce recidivism and increase an offenders likelihood of successful reintegration into society as a productive member of the populace.

    I sincerely hope that it is the beginning of the end of the prisons as an "industry". Prisons as an industry just don't work. The word "industry" implies something that creates profit. Prisons aren't intended to create profit but rather to create safe communities for law abiding citizens and their families and children. For prisons to create safe communities it takes much more than a stout set of bars and four walls. It takes education and training implemented by professionals that have a vested interest in the outcomes.
     
    Last edited: Aug 21, 2016
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  10. timac

    timac
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    Each burglary in the United States—a car break-in, for example—costs $41,288. For armed robberies the cost increases eight fold, to $335,733. Every aggravated assault costs $145,379. Each rape costs $448,532.

    Then there is murder, estimated price tag at $17,252,656. In 2009, according to the FBI, murder cost the United States almost $263 billion—nearly as much the federal government annually spends on Medicaid

    The fee to cover the average cost of incarceration for Federal inmates in Fiscal Year 2014 was $30,619.85 ($83.89 per day). The average prison sentence being 7.5 years $229,648.87

    The average cost of a 45acp hollow point bullet $1.30. If more people carried in the protection of their communities, this would save taxpayers a lot of money.
     
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  11. Jamie6.5

    Jamie6.5
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    The notion of kicking the indigent loose because they can't afford bail is ludicrous. Especially for any crime above urinating in public or nuisance charges.
    How do you find someone that has no address when they fail to show up for a court date? That has no ties to the community other than which soup kitchen they prefer? That carries all their worldly goods on their back? (or in a shopping cart)

    Then we get into "equal protection" issues under constitutional guidelines.
    How do we justify one law for the poor, and another for the rest of us?

    Next thing you know they'll have an entirely different set of laws for the rich too!
    Oh wait!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
     
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  12. Dyjital

    Dyjital
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    Geared towards a specific set of people. Obama and his BLM thugs. They live off the system so how would they pay? This rewards their actions.
     
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  13. Stomper

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    It goes further than that... it subsidizes their actions, with OUR own money being used against us. o_O
     
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