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temp sensitive?

Discussion in 'Ammunition & Reloading' started by v0lcom13sn0w, Apr 11, 2013.

  1. v0lcom13sn0w

    v0lcom13sn0w Keizer, or Well-Known Member

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    hey guys, first off id like to start off by saying i am fairly new to reloading maybe about 9 months in. I reload 308 and use blc2 with great results. after doing some research a few people have said that it is temperature sensitive. what i am wondering is does that mean that it shoots differently at 30 degrees than 80 degrees? or does it mean if i were to sight in when its 50 degrees out my rifle wont shoot the same when its hotter or colder? i have shot in all sorts of weather with my reloads and i havent noticed anything outrageous... i am no bench shooter by any means and dont expect to drive tacks. im happy if i hit the deer or elk in the engine compartment. can anyone shed some light on this for me?

    thanks guys!!
     
  2. Trailboss

    Trailboss Vancouver, WA Well-Known Member

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    The sensitivity to temp change will not matter for Elk hunting. When the powder is spoken of as temp sensitive, they are speaking of a point of impact change of 1 inch at 100 yard shift with a 100 degree change in outside temp. Significant for target shooters but not so much for elk hunters.
     
  3. v0lcom13sn0w

    v0lcom13sn0w Keizer, or Well-Known Member

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    hey thanks for the reply! its just that they(other forum members) make it seem like its such a dramatic change. i havent noticed anything. but, then again, im no bench target shooter. im the type to go set out milk jugs or bowling pins and shoot while leanin on the bed side of my truck
     
  4. DieselScout

    DieselScout S Clackamas County Well-Known Member

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    There is a really great book called "The Hunter's Guide to Ballistics: Practical Advice on How to Choose Guns and Loads, and Use them Effectively." I am guessing from the price on Amazon it's no longer being printed, but if you can find a copy read it. It really puts things in perspective regarding accuracy, loads, what effects and how much you should care.


    Oops, forgot the link Hunter's Guide to Ballistics
     
  5. deadshot2

    deadshot2 NW Quadrant WA State Well-Known Member

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    Temperature sensitivity isn't usually a problem for NW shooters. We don't get the extremes that are seen in the Midwest or "Up North".

    Do pay attention if you are developing loads at or real close to the max. If you do your development on 40 degree days during the early spring then go shooting on a nice super warm day, or down in Arizona where temps can be 100+ on most days, that could be an issue.

    If you load a max pressure load and it gets a lot warmer, then even temperature stable powders can be a problem.
     
  6. AMProducts

    AMProducts Maple Valley, WA Jerk, Ammo Manufacturer Silver Supporter

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    As has been said: Temp sensitivity comes into play environmentally... so if you zero your gun on a day when it's 120+F outside, it will shoot differently at 100, 80, 60, 40.

    The bigger place this comes into play is when you go from a load that's near max, and designed to work at 30 or below, and then shoot it at 80 or above. I have developed rounds for alaskan hunters that were designed to work after being exposed to 0F or below for long periods, all the testing was done after the gun and ammo were set in an environmental chamber for 48 hours, taken out, and immediately fired on the test-bed. Loads that probably would have blown your gun up at normal temperatures were pretty mild. We ended up having to use some very warm loads with IMR (single-base stick powder) with magnum primers. Also, we used nickel plated brass to ensure better extraction.
     
  7. v0lcom13sn0w

    v0lcom13sn0w Keizer, or Well-Known Member

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    so if im loading my 165g nosler BT with 46 gr blc2 which is .5 gr less than what nosler recommends for their max then i should be good to go correct? i load these rounds like that because my gun shoots most accurate with that load in my climate(hunting climate) ive also loaded some168gr match grade old herters bullets i picked up at olys with 43gr blc2 and bench rest primers and was completely amazed by them. i guess it comes down to knowing your gun and trial and error


    thanks
    michael