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Hi all,

Sometime soon, I am going to attempt to teach 4 young boys, age 6-12, gun safety. I met them today, and they are all respectful, but full of energy.

I understand legally this might be risky, but ethically how can I not take a chance to educate young men.

I have taught quite a few new shooters, all adults, and obviously I am safe myself.

Rather than starting a big thread, I just have a request. If someone has extensive experience, like they have been teaching kids at a camp or Boy Scouts, or have had multiple chances to teach kids other than their own, gun safety, please PM me and we can talk on the phone sometime in the next few weeks. Maybe twice? Once this week, and once a day or too before.
 
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I don't have extensive experience by any means, but one thing is that the teaching needs to take place over more than one meeting. The first time needs to be verbal explanation and use blue guns or unloaded airsoft guns or real guns with inert barrels. If they are unable or unwilling to display safe actions in that setting, then you never move on.

Gun safety lessons are as much about the kids' readiness for the learning. The only way it could possibly be safe without that readiness of the kids would be one safe adult per child. If it is only you, then the kids MUST be ready and intrinsically motivated to be safe.
 

s1xty7

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As someone who spent a number of years working at Scout camp as a teen, might I recommend single shot bolt action 22s. Teaches patience, discipline, and an excited youth might turn and face you after a shot with gun in hand. Easier to handle if there is no live round in it. Can't be of much more help than that. It's been decades and I just hung out at the range but didn't teach it regularly.

Good luck. You're doing those young men a real service.
 
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I don't have extensive experience by any means, but one thing is that the teaching needs to take place over more than one meeting. The first time needs to be verbal explanation and use blue guns or unloaded airsoft guns or real guns with inert barrels. If they are unable or unwilling to display safe actions in that setting, then you never move on.

Gun safety lessons are as much about the kids' readiness for the learning. The only way it could possibly be safe without that readiness of the kids would be one safe adult per child. If it is only you, then the kids MUST be ready and intrinsically motivated to be safe.


Agreed on all points and that is the plan. When we get to actually shooting I will have 1 kid shoot at a time. And the rest wait at the house or a safe distance.
 
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As someone who spent a number of years working at Scout camp as a teen, might I recommend single shot bolt action 22s. Teaches patience, discipline, and an excited youth might turn and face you after a shot with gun in hand. Easier to handle if there is no live round in it. Can't be of much more help than that. It's been decades and I just hung out at the range but didn't teach it regularly.

Good luck. You're doing those young men a real service.


Agreed. I already have a cricket .22 with irons, and a 10/22 with irons when they are ready after that.
 
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Not a lot of experience but I have introduced all my nieces and nephews to guns when they were between 7 and 10.
First thing I did was to teach them to clean a gun, the idea was to have them partially disassemble 22 rifles and put them back together while I explained how they functioned and went over the shooting rules explaining why they are so important, then one child at a time at the range.
 
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Can’t add any value to teaching a group kids how to shoot, but good on ya Taco!

My only suggestion would be to break them down into groups of two and teach two different sessions. A little less chaotic and they’ll really be able to pay attention without a lot of commotion going on around them. Plus less to keep an eye on for yourself, while trying to teach them. Good luck sir, I commend you.
 
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You might think about starting with a B.B. gun. I’ve coached quite a few young shooters over the years. With a B.B. gun there’s no noise or recoil so it makes it easier to teach the fundamentals.


Not a bad idea. But not sure I want to buy one just for this. I do have CCI quites for the .22.
 
Hi all,

Sometime soon, I am going to attempt to teach 4 young boys, age 6-12, gun safety. I met them today, and they are all respectful, but full of energy.

I understand legally this might be risky, but ethically how can I not take a chance to educate young men.

I have taught quite a few new shooters, all adults, and obviously I am safe myself.

Rather than starting a big thread, I just have a request. If someone has extensive experience, like they have been teaching kids at a camp or Boy Scouts, or have had multiple chances to teach kids other than their own, gun safety, please PM me and we can talk on the phone sometime in the next few weeks. Maybe twice? Once this week, and once a day or too before.

There is a gentleman by the name of Billy OBrien who is the Youth Activites Coordinator at Tri-County Gun Club and he is also a current RSO with the club. He recently started up a Youth Series called, "Intro to Rifle". Unfortunately, this is a member or member and guest only series. While I can't speak for him directly, I bet he would be more then happy to give you some pointers. I can PM his contact info to you if you would like.
 
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Im starting this with 2 little ones soon! Several things i have found to be helpful is to,
1) keep it fun while being safe
2) kids have short attention spans, keep verbal instruction short, use brakes to allow time for details to sink in.
3) always ask questions speciffically to what you just instructed, let them ask and answer questions.
4) keep it fun and intresting, have reactive targets that they can see results, a sort of reward for proper actions.
5) only have 1 gun out, one shooter at a time, and have the other shooter at a safe distence behind the firing line, make sure the non shooter can see whats going on, they will learn by watching and listening.
6) talk with them like adults, and express that shooting is a matter of trust and maturity, and that as long as they exhibit maturity, they can continue!

Good luck, this is a golden opportunity to teach life lessons and build on our future!
 
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For anyone looking for a lesson plan:

I taught GIs for two decades.
I taught my kids
I taught 4 grandchildren so far (4 to go).
I've introduced a lot of adults into the sport.
I taught for the BSA (merit badge).

First step was/is always academics; simple classes & simple written tests to include cartridge ID.

If they cannot pass academics, they do not advance to the next gate; tough love!

For the kids, they go through @ 2 hours of introduction & classes and 1 hour to test....then will the hands-on classes (gates 2-8) begin.

Basically 6 gates before LFX.

Gate 1: written academics & test.
Gate 2: characteristics, clear, disassemble, assemble, functions check, & test.
Gate 3: dry firing and misfire procedures, and test.
Gate 4: target aquisition, deliniation, sight picture, & test.
Gate 5: PPE, safety, security, maintenance, range edicit, gun/ammo care & storrage, & test.
Gate 6: Hands on examination.
Gate 7: Live fire.
Gate 8: Feedback.

Hope this helps
 
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There is a gentleman by the name of Billy OBrien who is the Youth Activites Coordinator at Tri-County Gun Club and he is also a current RSO with the club. He recently started up a Youth Series called, "Intro to Rifle". Unfortunately, this is a member or member and guest only series. While I can't speak for him directly, I bet he would be more then happy to give you some pointers. I can PM his contact info to you if you would like.


Yes please!
 
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Yes to post 15, explaining how a cartridge works from primer to crimp is a worthwhile lesson.

Good food for thought. Will put together some simple slides for them, maybe some youtube links of animations since they are all super into video games and electronics.
 

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