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Synthetic Motor Oil Better Than CLP ?

Discussion in 'Maintenance & Gunsmithing' started by skydiver, Sep 4, 2012.

  1. skydiver

    skydiver Sandy,OR Well-Known Member

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  2. TapRackNGo

    TapRackNGo PNW Well-Known Member

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    Good Stuff!
     
  3. Grunwald

    Grunwald Out of that nut job colony of Seattle, WA Well-Known Member

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    If you read the can of Break Free you'll learn that it is a synthetic oil.
    I'm sure that the formulation is different than Mobil 1, but that is what I will be using after my Break Free runs out.
     
  4. the4thshake

    the4thshake Portland Active Member

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    I think the problem with CLP is that it is thin and doesn't stay where you put it. Motor oil is thicker and seems to stay put fairly well......especially the heavier 40 and 50 weights. Axle grease stays put even better.
     
  5. AMProducts

    AMProducts Maple Valley, WA Jerk, Ammo Manufacturer Silver Supporter

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    CLP is the worst stuff I've ever used on my guns, it smells bad, attracts grit, and does a piss poor job of cleaning my guns. I stick with the trusted hoppes #9 for cleaning just about everything. For lubricating my AR, Rem-Oil. I have been out in the desert more than once and had my AR start to get jammy with me, and went over to the jeep, opened up the oil cap, stuck my finger into the engine and got enough oil on my fingers to lube up the bolt carrier and get things fixed for the moment.

    I've tried all kinds of things to get guns working better, and while I like to stick to rem-oil as it's the most no-fuss lubricant I've found, ATF also works well when applied thinly, as well as compound gear oils (the kind used on steam engines) as well as plain old pig lard. If it were not for the fact that lard often has salt content, and a tendency to go rancid it would likely be the perfect lubricant for many firearm applications.
     
  6. deadshot2

    deadshot2 NW Quadrant WA State Well-Known Member

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    I used to work for an Oil Company. I still find it amazing what people will believe from all the marketing BS.

    Just look at the number of "Gun Oils" that are on the market today.

    Cleaners tend to be low viscosity fluids, mostly solvents. That's the method they use to clean deposits of carbon and crud. To dilute and creep under the deposits. Lubricants have higher viscosity's and film strength in order to keep metal from rubbing metal. Rarely does ONE fluid do a good job of both.

    The only real difference between synthetic or "dead dinosaur" oil is the ability of the manufacturer to construct a product with specific performance aspects. They also, when building these oil molecules they also get to leave out the undesirable aspects like the residual's that tend to form sludge and carbon on their own.

    What I like about synthetic oils is the fact that since I use one in my truck, I merely collect the small amount that clings to the inside of the bottle when pouring into the engine. Every oil change gives me more than enough to keep all my firearms adequately lubed with enough left over for Press Rams and linkages.

    Only issue with ATF is that water is miscible in it. It's designed to emulsify any water that comes in contact with it and can give you a oily mess that looks like something the dog spit up. I prefer oils that stick to the metal and repel water.

    Other than that, like an old unit armorer told me one time, "It's not WHAT you use, it's the fact that you clean your weapon and use SOMETHING to lube it.

    BTW, on CLP, the stickiness is what some firearm manufacturers want you to use. Especially on a new firearm. It sticks to everything and prevents galling of newly machined parts. That's exactly the opposite of what you want in a dry dusty environment (like we've ever seen that here in the Pac NW).

    As for all the "Super Special Wonder Cleaner Lubes" that are showing up all the time with numerous "endorsements" by those who served in the Sand Box, I'll stick with good old Motor Oil for lube and a can of Brake-Kleen to degrease and clean. Sweet's 7.62 is about the only specialty cleaner I use and that's just for copper.
     
  7. speedtriple

    speedtriple Vancouver, Washington, United States Member

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    skydiver and (deleted member) like this.
  8. Blitzkrieg

    Blitzkrieg WA Well-Known Member

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    Most of my lube and metal protection is with synthetic motor oil
     
  9. Hammer_Man

    Hammer_Man Hillsboro Member

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    When I was breaking in my DPMS 308, I had a hard time getting the bolt to cycle by hand. At times it was so difficult to chamber a round, that I thought I might have purchased a defective rifle. When I called their customer support hotline, I was told that I should try using a synthetic motor oil instead of "regular gun oil." At first I thought their phone agent was crazy, but after coating the bolt with a light film of ELF 5w40 syn, the bolt loosened up, and started cycling like it was supposed to. After that, I decided to keep a bottle of motor oil in my gun kit.
     
  10. deadshot2

    deadshot2 NW Quadrant WA State Well-Known Member

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    Just think of a semi-automatic firearm as a One Cylinder engine. Motor oils are formulated to deal with the same issues present in a firearm. Heat, Pressure, Dirt, Carbon, Rust, Oxidation, Anti-Seize/Galling, etc.

    BTW, did anyone who read Grant Cunningham's take on lubes stated that Rem Oil is at the bottom of the list. I think it has such a following because of the amount of time that it's been on the market.
     
  11. chunkeymonkey66

    chunkeymonkey66 chehalis Highway to Hell

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    I use turbine 32 oil. Only because I have access to it. Good stuff. If it will protect a motor spinning at 15,000 rpms. Should work on a single cylinder.