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Swager Tool in the area?

Discussion in 'Ammunition & Reloading' started by JE3146, Jan 29, 2013.

  1. JE3146

    JE3146 Tigard, OR New Member

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    Anyone know of a shop in the Tualatin/Beaverton/Portland area that has a Dillon Super Swage 600 or RCBS Benchtop Swager Tool in stock that doesn't want a kidney in exchange for it?

    Newbie mistake... forgot I needed one for military brass that I now have in bulk... and they're sold out... everywhere...

    Any help is appreciated. Thanks.
     
  2. Certaindeaf

    Certaindeaf SE Portland Well-Known Member

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    I used to have/use an RCBS primer pocket swager. These days I just use a tiny and blunt sheepsfoot type blade. It works very well actually.
    Lore has it certain size drill bits work great/perfectly.
     
  3. nwdrifter

    nwdrifter troutdale oregon Active Member

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    saw on on ebay the other day for $230. :huh:
     
  4. vertical ascent

    vertical ascent Vancouver Active Member

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    Have you considered an alternative, RCBS has a Primer Pocket Swager Tool-2 die pn#9481 (both for 223/5.56 and .25+ calibers) It is a cheaper alternative, I found one at Wholesale Sports on 82nd Ave for $36.00 three weeks ago, they had three of them in stock.
     
  5. deadshot2

    deadshot2 NW Quadrant WA State Well-Known Member

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    Open up your horizons when it comes to military crimped brass. Just get the Dillon Super Swage and don't look back. One of the easiest tools to use and you can "de-crimp" a ton of brass in a very little time---------All without having cramps develop in your hand or arm.

    I had an RCBS swaging tool once. Ended up giving it away for free. Shortly after that, the guy I gave it to gave it away as well. He bought a Dillon Super Swage.

    You can ream, cut, drill, and all kinds of mickey-mouse ways to get the crimp out but the Dillon Swaging tool will do it faster, more accurately, and not remove any metal while doing so. Leaves a nice rolled radius on the primer pocket mouth.
     
  6. Certaindeaf

    Certaindeaf SE Portland Well-Known Member

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    You can do it!
     
  7. JE3146

    JE3146 Tigard, OR New Member

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    I picked up one of these from Brownells. Even with shipping, it ends up costing me less cus of gas to drive to the east side.

    I figure eventually I'll get the Dillon, but the wife is watching finances a bit more closely after going nuts on all the rest of the equipment and supplies :D

    Thanks all.
     
  8. HappyRoman

    HappyRoman Sherwood Forest Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

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    dillion swegger.. check with Jheuy on this board.
     
  9. AMProducts

    AMProducts Maple Valley, WA Jerk, Ammo Manufacturer Silver Supporter

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    Ok, here's what you do, take your case mouth deburring tool (RCBS, LEE, whatever) stick the pointy end in the back of the case... spin it until it takes off the crimp. if you spend more than $20 on this operation... you're doing it wrong.

    Congrats, you how have a reamed primer pocket.

    Swaging primer pockets has only become acceptable because it's easier than reaming, reaming is actually the superior technique.
     
  10. DieselScout

    DieselScout S Clackamas County Well-Known Member

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    YouTube has a few video's of people using a counter sink bit in a cordless drill. Just a few seconds and no crimp! You mileage may very but it is another option.
     
  11. ma96782

    ma96782 Vancouver, WA Well-Known Member

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    These are some old posts I made......

    ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    Some books have said to use a "reamer".....IMHO…..DON'T USE THIS STYLE OF TOOL..........

    Forster Chamfer Deburring Tool 17 to 45 Cal

    Someone once asked: Why Not?

    A standard chamfer/de-burr tool (like the tool above) could be used but, your results will vary greatly. In my younger days I tried using it but, I encountered problems with getting squared cuts and sometimes over doing it. And, it does nothing for the actual diameter of the pocket (IF, there is a problem there). YMWV.

    Currently, I use these tools......

    Large Primer Pocket Size #7777785

    Lyman Primer Pocket Reamer Tool Large

    Small Primer Pocket Size #7777784

    Lyman Primer Pocket Reamer Tool Small

    With, the Lyman Hand tool I've eliminated those problems. It has a safe edge on the bottom.....it won't cut the pocket deeper. The cutter will simply spin, via hand power, cutting off the crimp and, it'll leave a slight chamfer to the primer pocket opening. It will also correct an "undersized pocket" and an "out of round" condition, but only to the limits of the tool's cutting edge, under hand power. And, the cutting edge can be dulled, to "adjust" the cut (IF, you wanted to do that). It's a "hand tool" and I wouldn't mount it in a drill........but, that's ME.

    BTW, my Speer #10 Re-loading manual has a picture of a pocket knife being used to “process” a military crimp (page 71).

    And, for commercial cases, IF needed, the Lyman reamer hand tool will also slightly "chamfer" the primer pocket opening that has that "sharp edge." And, while it's in there.....IF, the primer pocket is too small, it'll do it's magic for that problem, too.

    Then again, sometimes just changing your brand of primer can work to tighten things up a bit.

    Perhaps, using the wrong tool and/or other misusage of a hand de-crimp reamer, may be the reason why, some people are so anti-reamer?

    You know the saying about using the right tool for the job?

    Well, IMHO......the right tool, is the one specially made for the job of addressing the crimp. In this case, I use a Lyman Hand military de-crimp reamer tool.

    Not to mention that, the learning curve is so short. Just insert the tool into the primer pocket, twist, remove the tool and it’s done. It’s the sort of a mindless operation, that I can do while watching T.V.

    IF, your hand starts to cramp or you get tired..........just stop and take a break.

    IF, you choose the swage method (Dillon $94.95).........so be it.

    YMWV.

    Aloha, Mark

    ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++


    Question: Does using the swage die preclude the need for a primer pocket uniformer?

    Answer: First off.........there are two different types of common primer pocket uniformers.

    1) Uniform the pocket for DEPTH.

    2) Uniform the pocket for DIAMETER. Which can also take care of the military crimp when it's part of the design.

    So..........on the subject of the military crimp.........you can choose to either, swage or ream. You don't need to do both.

    That being said, you could use a uniformer for DEPTH and DIAMETER cuts. IF, you wanted to. Some benchrest folks might/will say that it’s essential.

    _______________________________________

    And, don't believe the stories that: “A swage won't remove metal, it'll only push it away.”

    Nope, while using a swage, I've seen the broken off rings of brass and brass shavings. So, obviously it's "removing metal." It could be attributed to the brass quality, crimp style or the amount of adjustment that was used.

    Huh?

    Yup.........a lot of folks don't mention that swagers need to be adjusted correctly for optimal results.

    And, the support rod that goes down the neck has been known to crush the burr on the flash channel (left there during production of the brass). The obstruction may or may not be a problem, depending on how YOU choose to look at it.

    But, even that problem can be dealt with. Another tool can be used to uniform the flash channel from the inside of the case. It's another step to deal with.

    So, there is a downside to using the swage method. YMWV.

    But, don't get me wrong. IF, I was sitting down and just swaging 1000s of cases......I'd probably want to use a Dillon Swage.

    But, that's not my style. So, I use a reamer while watching TV.

    HTH.

    Aloha, Mark
     
  12. deadshot2

    deadshot2 NW Quadrant WA State Well-Known Member

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    Right up to the point where you ruin the case by reaming too deep. Then you have brass that's only suitable for Black Hills Ammo to use with their reloads. I kept a few samples of their handicraft. The cases have primer pockets reamed so deep that half of he primer cup is unsupported. Primers sure seat easy but leak so much gas that I have a bolt with a permanent etched ring around the firing pin hole.

    Yes, as a commercial loader you would prefer reaming. Easier to do with auto machinery. Also allows for easier primer insertion.

    As a handloader that likes to use his brass more than one more time, no thank you, I'll swage.
     
    Joe Link likes this.