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A Spoon would be handy ...one can eat almost anything with a spoon.
Some sort of pocket knife...
A book , be it a Bible , a copy of Shakespeare , etc ...Lots of boring downtime , even when in a combat zone.
Perhaps a deck of cards or dice for the "sporting fellas"....

While my last two may seem a bit out of place for "survival tools"...
Mental relief from the boredom that can make up much of military life and to escape the horrors of war , is important.
And while the "Civil War" was a bit before my time in the army...I feel that some things will hold true , no matter when one served.
Andy
 
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The find folks at Kay-Bar make a dandy set that clips together with knife, fork and spoon and they don't cost a lot of Dollars $$$. It even comes with a belt carrier, all for one low price.:):):)
 
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A Spoon would be handy ...one can eat almost anything with a spoon.
Some sort of pocket knife...
A book , be it a Bible , a copy of Shakespeare , etc ...Lots of boring downtime , even when in a combat zone.
Perhaps a deck of cards or dice for the "sporting fellas"....

While my last two may seem a bit out of place for "survival tools"...
Mental relief from the boredom that can make up much of military life and to escape the horrors of war , is important.
And while the "Civil War" was a bit before my time in the army...I feel that some things will hold true , no matter when one served.
Andy
I specifically mentioned that some things like eating tools were obvious enough to leave out .

The entertainment stuff was hinted at, but I'm planning to pitch another article to them along those lines lol.
 
Umm what ?

I understand that electronic communication is fraught with hazards and much meaning can be lost.
With that said...
How I read your replies to my comments , comes across to me a least as , condescending and as if you are picking apart my comments , to look for something to disagree with .
Again this may only be my "read" on things.
So I will no longer reply or take part in your threads to avoid any further misunderstandings.
Andy
 
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If I wanted to nitpick I would have. Pointing out spoons were addressed and I hoped to sell another article on mental health items is not nitpicking.

Although I did cover nitpicking with the comb :p
Boil a pot of coffee, light a clay pipe and smile. You are probably far more awake than I am, and I've got a long day of furniture moving ahead still.
 

Siglvr

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Great writing Steve! If you have more I'd like to read that as well. Historical note, the WW1 women's auxiliary called themselves "Cooties" (aka Body lice). I was up at the VA Hospital and asked one of them once why the named themselves "Cooties": she said: "It's because we attach ourselves to our men dear". LOL

Anyway, how about a tin with some char-cloth and a flint? All the stories note that when an army moved on, typically all the fences had been burned for firewood.
 
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bbbass

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I enjoyed the reading. I'll leave the comments to speak for themselves.

One of my hunting partners always brings a sewing kit to elk camp, as well as leather stitching tools... he is a popular guy.

I always wear a bandana around my neck when hunting. Even tho I carry rope, the bandana not only keeps cold air off my budding neck beard, but could be used as an arm sling if need be. As a bandage, it would be third class but better than nothing, as a tourniquet it would suck... I don't think I could get it tight enough. Speaking of which, I need to look at getting a tourniquet for my go bag and hunting pack!!!
 
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Anyway, how about a tin with some char-cloth and a flint? All the stories note that when an army moved on, typically all the fences had been burned for firewood.

Armies typically plundered anything that wasn't nailed down, and quite a bit that was. When you needed firewood or food, or other supplies, you foraged, especially when far and away from supply lines. It had the added benefit for Union troops that they were typically destroying Southern infrastructure, farms and plantations. Then of course Sherman and his men raised destructive foraging to an art form...

As for the char cloth, that is a good point. I was trying to avoid the obvious and low hanging fruit though. Fire starters, eating utensils, personal effects and the like generally are a given, and something you could reasonably come up with. I was really going for the more obscure stuff, and it seems I hit that nail on the proverbial head.
 
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Great writing Steve! If you have more I'd like to read that as well

Thanks I don't really have anymore offhand, a Civil War kit was pretty basic, but there is a link or two in the article that discusses things CW troops were known to carry. One could make a comprehensive list and then have to redo it again and again for different times, places, and units.

It really boils down to blanket, spare underwear, waterproof ground cloth, coat, poncho, mess kit, blanket, shelter half, and whatever personal effects they might choose or small things plus issued and personal arms and such. Real basic loadout. Rations were issued before a march, and sometimes before a battle, and they varied in availability and quality. You could buy things from the suttlers that followed armies too, usually foodstuffs and bits of comforts and stuff.

Of course the CS couldn't always achieve that, and there was much plundering of dead Yankees after a battle for gear and such.
 
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