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Survival Shelter: A Low Impact Woodland Home

Discussion in 'Preparedness & Survival' started by Father of four, Nov 25, 2011.

  1. Father of four

    Father of four Portland, Oregon Well-Known Member

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    A Low Impact Woodland Home

    Some key points of the design and construction:

    Dug into hillside for low visual impact and shelter
    Stone and mud from diggings used for retaining walls, foundations etc.
    Frame of oak thinnings (spare wood) from surrounding woodland
    Reciprocal roof rafters are structurally and aesthaetically fantastic and very easy to do
    Straw bales in floor, walls and roof for super-insulation and easy building
    Plastic sheet and mud/turf roof for low impact and ease
    Lime plaster on walls is breathable and low energy to manufacture (compared to cement)
    Reclaimed (scrap) wood for floors and fittings
    Anything you could possibly want is in a rubbish pile somewhere (windows, burner, plumbing, wiring...)
    Woodburner for heating - renewable and locally plentiful
    Flue goes through big stone/plaster lump to retain and slowly release heat
    Fridge is cooled by air coming underground through foundations
    Skylight in roof lets in natural feeling light
    Solar panels for lighting, music and computing
    Water by gravity from nearby spring
    Compost toilet
    Roof water collects in pond for garden etc.

    Nice job!!! Well done!!!
     
  2. NativePride

    NativePride Vancouver WA Member

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    You should read Mike Oehler's books.

    I was gifted with his set when I met him this july.
     
  3. TapRackNGo

    TapRackNGo PNW Well-Known Member

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    Thats pretty awesome.
     
  4. knuckle Head

    knuckle Head southeast Well-Known Member

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  5. Garg

    Garg east of portland metro Hold my beer..... watch this Bronze Supporter

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    That is very cool.
     
  6. Father of four

    Father of four Portland, Oregon Well-Known Member

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    Its great to see what some people get to build in other countries. There is no way we could do something like that in this country. Way, way to many rules and regulations. Not enough freedom.
     
    rufus and (deleted member) like this.
  7. mjbskwim

    mjbskwim Salmon,Idaho Well-Known Member

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  8. Thebastidge

    Thebastidge 10411 NE Fourth Plain Blvd Vancouver WA 98662 Well-Known Member

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  9. Decker

    Decker My house Active Member

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    I like the idea of a sustainable/cob/hay/stuff-like-that house but how well are they going to hold up in an earthquake?

    -d
     
  10. Thebastidge

    Thebastidge 10411 NE Fourth Plain Blvd Vancouver WA 98662 Well-Known Member

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    Put the cob house entirely on a concrete slab, use the correct portions of straw, and you should be fine. The concrete slab 'floats' the house, the straw forms a 3 dimensional matrix inside the clay/sand mixture and makes it pretty much a monolithic construction.

    A 'traditional' home is constructed on dimensional lumber and achieves structural integrity through 90 degree angles. Stress the house more than a few degrees in any directions and it completely loses structural integrity. A cob house can achieve structural integrity through curves. A round, monolithic wall is much stronger than a 90 degree wall made of dimensional lumber, and withstands stress over a longer distance than a straight, flat wall.

    Personally, I would not build a cob house more than two stories high. But the majority of houses aren't two stories high anyway.

    Cob is also fireproof for all practical purposes, you're not going to shoot a bullet through 24" of cob/adobe, it'll be super quiet inside, and it has much better thermal mass for passive solar planning.
     
  11. PaulZ

    PaulZ Oregon City Active Member

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  12. CommandoJoe

    CommandoJoe Pacific Northwest Member

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  13. PaulZ

    PaulZ Oregon City Active Member

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    That does look interesting. Remember the "Russian" heating? they ran the combustion gases around a massive brick wall affair. I saw one on Vashon Island years ago
     
  14. Father of four

    Father of four Portland, Oregon Well-Known Member

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    For a small survival shelter the woodland home could be done by 1 adult alone in only a few days with basic tools. A person could make a very primitive one in maybe just a day or two. I am glad I got to see and study how it was built.
     
  15. CamoDeafie

    CamoDeafie Albany Well-Known Member

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    or bust out the end of Cold War era US Army Training Manual (TM) on cover, concealment, camouflage and go to the chapter on making fighting positions; much the same idea; using rain proofs/ponchos/shelter half underneath sod and grasses matted over a log framework/roof material in makeshift bunkers and just enlarge it enough to turn it into a habitable dwelling :)
     
  16. Father of four

    Father of four Portland, Oregon Well-Known Member

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    The rocket stove would be another great survival tool. I have a couple rocket stove plans saved on my hard drive somewhere. (I should print them out and put them in a binder.) There are different ways to build them and can be easily researched on the web.
     
  17. Decker

    Decker My house Active Member

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  18. Father of four

    Father of four Portland, Oregon Well-Known Member

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    Thanks Decker.

    Yes, I had saved a copy of his stuff over a year ago. I too would love to try out that earth shelter plan of his. And try out some other things he shows us. Thanks for the link.
     
  19. Decker

    Decker My house Active Member

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  20. Father of four

    Father of four Portland, Oregon Well-Known Member

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    A bit too UFO'e or Robin The Hood'e for me. Interesting though.