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Survival Cave Foods?

Discussion in 'Preparedness & Survival' started by theguncrank, Feb 18, 2013.

  1. theguncrank

    theguncrank Columbia County Active Member

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    Hello, my survival minded friends on NWFA. I'm re-entering the prepping field, on a very low budget and with limited space (i.e.- I live in apartment, so no space to raise veggies or animals because the small backyard is dominated by a cherry tree that does not belong to me, and kills anything I plant, including grass). As a child, I learned to forage wild greens, nuts and berries; I can catch fish, trap crawdads, and hit pretty much anything I aim at with a rifle (as long as it's not moving too fast LOL). I have read Backwoodsman Magazine for some years. My concern is not so much TEOTWAWKI, but to be ready for a short term, localized event that could prevent us from going out obtaining groceries. At this point I would like to put a small amount of long term food aside, and I want to get things right the first time. I have some past experience with storing grains, beans, etc.; and have a local source for all of that.

    My specific question: Does anyone have any experience with Survival Cave brand of foods? Good quality, or a waste of money? Most LTS brands I see use TVP meat substitutes, or premixed dishes with some real meat in them. I see freeze-dried product as an unnecessary strain on emergency water stores. I like the idea of REAL meat in long term storage cans, that I would not have to remember to rotate every year or two.

    Survival Cave: Emergency Food Supply, Best Long Term Food For Survival
     
    Last edited: Feb 19, 2013
  2. ArgentineSteel

    ArgentineSteel Vancouver, WA Active Member

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    Cattails. Roots in the Winter, shoots in the Spring, and heads in the Summer. If they were good enough for the natives, they're good enough for TEOTWOWKI
     
  3. Blitzkrieg

    Blitzkrieg WA Well-Known Member

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    Technically speaking the foil packets do not last nearly as long as the sealed, nitrogen packed metal cans. As in 5 years compared to 30. If you plan to rotate, fine, but otherwise buy the sealed cans

    Meat is going to be the most rare of survival items right along with liquor, plan wisely. You can grow veggies and pick wild berries and dig roots but meat is not going to be easily had
     
  4. Zeshio

    Zeshio Olympia Active Member

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    From my understanding it would be more cost effective to grow or can your own food than it would be to buy from survival specific companies. I've seen people can their own meat but I'm vegetarian so I've never done it firsthand. I'd save up water in cheap containers (or water storage containers), buy cheap staples such as dried beans and rice, and learn how to store it properly (protect from light, heat, water, air). Buy food you plan to eat, so know what you're getting and what it tastes like before you make the dive. I'd read some of the survivalist/prepper blogs out there to help you in your decision making process and develop a plan of what your highest priority items are. Meat definitely seems like a luxury, I would focus more on other high protein items that store longer (seeds, nuts, beans).
     
  5. Blitzkrieg

    Blitzkrieg WA Well-Known Member

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    To the OP.. look into whole oat groats.. they make excellent and easy to prepare porridge of various types, and can be steamed up or cooked like rice as a side dish. I'm about to buy another 200 lbs of it and 100 lbs of barley. Store in 5 gallon buckets or the big food grade plastic barrels with oxy absorbers added

    Whole Oat Groats | 50 LB bag | honeyvillegrain.com

    There are pros and cons to prepping your own storage foods, (dehydrated/canned) but some oats and some cases of #12 cans of meat will be there when you need them, no matter what else happens, if you store it well and well hidden. Nice insurance

    Nuts go rancid, FAST. Whole grains have been found in the pyramids and they sprouted! This is the grain basis for pyramid beers. Do not believe the silly shelf life they list on that site.. stored properly grains will outlast you

    PS: Most supermarket bakery depts will give you free 3.5 to 5 gallon plastic buckets with the lids if you ask nice
     
  6. Barefoot343

    Barefoot343 liberalville Active Member

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    yes, Blitz is right on about the buckets too. We got some of ours at wallyworld (bread/pastries area), trouble is everyone is starting to catch on so you have to call them and ask them to hold them for you.

    I know this is a bit off topic but you will need them.
     
  7. theguncrank

    theguncrank Columbia County Active Member

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    I thank you all for the advice so far. I have updated my initial post in the hopes that it clarifies what I want to know.
     
  8. Blitzkrieg

    Blitzkrieg WA Well-Known Member

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    Most freeze dried nitro packed foods are made by two manufacturers and simply labeled for the end retailers. Air dried without nitrogen atmosphere is not nearly as long shelf life

    It's all about the packing process and the cost per serving/actual ingredients. Forget brands

    I would heartily suggest you buy a Dutch Oven Cookbook and buy a good US made Dutch Oven as well

    A Blast Match and a bunch of matches packed in a US ammo can with silica gel