JavaScript is disabled
Our website requires JavaScript to function properly. For a better experience, please enable JavaScript in your browser settings before proceeding.
You can charge an AR with your index finger and thumb…. It's not getting much easier than that.
Not sure how it is for you, but I just double checked and both of my index fingers and thumbs are attached to my hands, which are attached to my arms by my wrists, and those arms are linked to my torso by my shoulders
So even though the index finger and thumb are the body parts that contact the charging handle there are other issues to consider, like upper body strength and range of motion issues that could effect another person, even though you and I have no trouble at all charging a standard AR
 
Are there any long guns that are easy to operate for people with weak hands? Easy to charge, easy to remove mags, easy to close the bolt, etc.

The goal is to be able to hand my wife and my older son a long gun in the event we need to defend our home (it's unlikely but still), but both are weak handed.

My wife struggles to charge an AR so she chose a 20 gauge 590 and handles it fine.

My son on the other hand, he isn't comfortable with a shotgun and can't charge an AR15 even with an extended latch, my CZ Scorpion, or my AK.

I think a PCC would be better that a rifle caliber. I was wondering how easy it is to operate a Ruger PC carbine in 9mm. I've never handled an AR9, are those easier to charge than an AR15? I'm guessing they probably are. Open to other suggestions.

And yes, I'm sure some of the issue is technique and he does need more training, but if I can get him a rifle he can use well, something he doesn't struggle with, he will be more confident learning. Let's not go down that rabbit hole, different subject.
CZ Bren 2. Easy to use the side charging handle. Its relatively light weight for a piston system. In 556 it takes AR mags so you don't need to worry about sourcing proprietary mags. Id recommend the 14in and pin option.

If you or the family would like to try one out. Send me a pm
 
Not sure how it is for you, but I just double checked and both of my index fingers and thumbs are attached to my hands, which are attached to my arms by my wrists, and those arms are linked to my torso by my shoulders
So even though the index finger and thumb are the body parts that contact the charging handle there are other issues to consider, like upper body strength and range of motion issues that could effect another person, even though you and I have no trouble at all charging a standard AR

Please tell me more.
 
Are there any long guns that are easy to operate for people with weak hands? Easy to charge, easy to remove mags, easy to close the bolt, etc.

The goal is to be able to hand my wife and my older son a long gun in the event we need to defend our home (it's unlikely but still), but both are weak handed.

My wife struggles to charge an AR so she chose a 20 gauge 590 and handles it fine.

My son on the other hand, he isn't comfortable with a shotgun and can't charge an AR15 even with an extended latch, my CZ Scorpion, or my AK.

I think a PCC would be better that a rifle caliber. I was wondering how easy it is to operate a Ruger PC carbine in 9mm. I've never handled an AR9, are those easier to charge than an AR15? I'm guessing they probably are. Open to other suggestions.

And yes, I'm sure some of the issue is technique and he does need more training, but if I can get him a rifle he can use well, something he doesn't struggle with, he will be more confident learning. Let's not go down that rabbit hole, different subject.
My Dad has weak hands, he can only chamber his Ruger LCP by putting it in the vise

I got him one of these

 

Please tell me more.
I understand the point you think you are making, but the reality is that that video (and kudos to him!) actually does a better job of supporting my position.

To recap:
You can charge an AR with your index finger and thumb…. It's not getting much easier than that.
I replied saying that there is more involved in than those two digits, and that upper body strength and mobility had more to do with using a traditional AR charging handle than do the index finger and thumb

You replied with a video of someone lacking most if not all of his hands (didn't pause the video to take too close a look) but exhibiting a high degree of upper body strength and mobility which are the the attributes I think play a larger roll in using a traditional AR charging handle.

I still think an AR especially in pistol configuration is a solid choice , that side charging 45acp builders kit from the classified has a lot going for it, but not everyone is built the same, has the same range of motion or strength and there is no reason not to accommodate those issues as long as the accommodations don't effect the reliability of the firearm.
 
Not sure how this fits your requirements, but I will throw this out as some feedback:

My daughter has MS, so she has issues with recoil and sound, muscle weakness and tremors. So weight of firearms/ammo and recoil is an issue.

Both myself and SIL have BP/heart issues, so stamina is an issue. So weight is an issue.

We are "preppers", so for "get home" guns, and guns to carry around the home property while doing chores, I wanted something compact and lightweight, with sufficient ammo capacity, and lethal enough to serve as a defensive gun set (carbine and sidearm).

I chose a PS90 and Five Seven combo. Niche guns. I have other gun combos that are more conventional, that would serve from a fixed position.

The PS90 needs an extended charge handle, but those are available; there are several variations available.

 
I understand the point you think you are making, but the reality is that that video (and kudos to him!) actually does a better job of supporting my position.

To recap:

I replied saying that there is more involved in than those two digits, and that upper body strength and mobility had more to do with using a traditional AR charging handle than do the index finger and thumb

You replied with a video of someone lacking most if not all of his hands (didn't pause the video to take too close a look) but exhibiting a high degree of upper body strength and mobility which are the the attributes I think play a larger roll in using a traditional AR charging handle.

I still think an AR especially in pistol configuration is a solid choice , that side charging 45acp builders kit from the classified has a lot going for it, but not everyone is built the same, has the same range of motion or strength and there is no reason not to accommodate those issues as long as the accommodations don't effect the reliability of the firearm.
Well you can always put the stock on the ground and use your foot to engage the charging handle. Kinda like a kickstand. lol.

I understand what you're saying. But to me it's excuses. How about fixing the problem (weak hands/arms/whatever) rather than trying to source a product that adapts to a problem that could be fixed.

Weak hands, more than likely means weak arms, weak legs and a weak core too. Charging the rifle is the first step. How long is the individual going to be able to present the rifle in a fight before fatigue sets in….. Run with the rifle? Etc.

If it is solely being weak. If it's a medical condition than that's another scenario. Although I would argue the AR is one of the most simple and easy platforms to adapt to and use (video I posted).

It's like an overweight person asking about a camp chair that would be best too hold their 400 pounds around the campfire when the real answer is quit eating and dont be a fat bag of a$$. If it's an issue that can be solved with putting in work then that's going to be my answer. Yes, it's painful, takes time, blood and sweat. But it's worth it. Everyone wants the easy answer/fix. That's not how I think or live my life.
 
Last Edited:
Granny Clampett actually favored a skillet instead of a shotgun because of lumbago so do that.
Not sure picking up a skillet is an option here due to grip strength…. lol. It's a good option though.
 
Goal is home defense last resort, sh!+ got real bad and I have to hand a rifle to my 14yo son who is a typical gamer teen, ie not strong and on the spectrum. (FYI, being on the spectrum alone does not mean a person is not fit to handle guns. I've been teaching him gun safety since he was born and he understands). I'm not anticipating leaving the house but want a long gun because he is not accurate with a pistol right now. He's shot a few times. He handled a Marlin 795 well but has struggled to charge every other gun I have handed him. Unsuppressed, rifle calibers are too much. It's not the recoil, it's the concussion I think. But since he last shot an AR, I now have a suppressor so that might change things. But for now a rifle caliber is out of the question for him unless there is a rifle that has low concussion and is easy for weak handed people to operate.

I want him to have something semi-auto since I don't think he could run a bolt, pump, or lever action fast enough. Despite being good at video games, he has poor dexterity in general. Poor kid is right handed and left eye dominant, but has used iron sights surprisingly well. He just doesn't know how to use the strength that he does have. I need to get him into some marshal arts.

Basically, I'm trying to overcome his weaknesses with technology until he can improve. Like, what is the rifle equivalent to the Shield EZ?! 😝
I would be looking at a bolt or lever operated rimfire rifle. 22 mag, 17 HMR, 5mm, etc... Not so loud, not so heavy, easy to operate. on the lower end of pistol caliber. Next up would be a lever gun in 38/357. If he is interested he will learn to run a lever gun. DR
 
Maybe this, if you already have an AR……. I have no personal experience with this product though so I'm not sure how well it works.


Disregard. I'm pretty sure the OP has me on ignore. So he won't see this suggestion.
 
Last Edited:
At 14yrs old, the firearm shouldn't be complicated or chambered in a large caliber. When I was that age, I started shooting 308 win and it was bruizing being a small kid. Try a smaller caliber like the 22 wmr (22 mag). Lighter recoil = lighter recoil springs = easier to charge the bolt.

If he still has a hard time manipulating the controls, let him grow up a little more. Or visit a gunsmith and modify the firearm.
 
At 14yrs old, the firearm shouldn't be complicated or chambered in a large caliber. When I was that age, I started shooting 308 win and it was bruizing being a small kid.
Yes, there are practical limits as to what young shooters can handle. Some can handle more than others. My grandson can shoot a pump 20 gauge until we run out of clay birds. But I haven't let him step up to a 12 yet.

Also can pertain to elder shooters.

I have a Winchester Model 70 in .308 Win., came from the factory without a recoil pad. Even that is a bit more stout than I like to shoot these days. Shoulder surgery introduced me to certain limits. Of course for reloaders, there is always the option of reduced loads which are not punishing. Some of the bullets made today are designed to expand at lower velocities.

I'd never had a recoil tolerance problem firing M1 Rifles. Then one time, I decided that I would bang away from the prone position for the first time in a while. On the shoulder than had been operated on. That experience resulted in a nerve impingement that lasted for months. What you might call a real learning experience.
 
Goal is home defense last resort, sh!+ got real bad and I have to hand a rifle to my 14yo son who is a typical gamer teen, ie not strong and on the spectrum. (FYI, being on the spectrum alone does not mean a person is not fit to handle guns. I've been teaching him gun safety since he was born and he understands). I'm not anticipating leaving the house but want a long gun because he is not accurate with a pistol right now. He's shot a few times. He handled a Marlin 795 well but has struggled to charge every other gun I have handed him. Unsuppressed, rifle calibers are too much. It's not the recoil, it's the concussion I think. But since he last shot an AR, I now have a suppressor so that might change things. But for now a rifle caliber is out of the question for him unless there is a rifle that has low concussion and is easy for weak handed people to operate.

I want him to have something semi-auto since I don't think he could run a bolt, pump, or lever action fast enough. Despite being good at video games, he has poor dexterity in general. Poor kid is right handed and left eye dominant, but has used iron sights surprisingly well. He just doesn't know how to use the strength that he does have. I need to get him into some marshal arts.

Basically, I'm trying to overcome his weaknesses with technology until he can improve. Like, what is the rifle equivalent to the Shield EZ?! 😝
If your son is like mine was, also on the spectrum and perseverates on subjects, handing him a gun he uses in games and teaching him to shoot it will likely start a process in his head.
If he isn't strong enough to handle it, you can point out his characters are strong and teach him exercises to get there.
My son looks like a blade of grass, like he will blow away in the wind. But he's a surprisingly agile and strong one. Part of it was teaching him to shoot my 338 Winmag, his favorite rifle.
I would encourage you to get him off gaming - if he's playing FPS games, it induces a great deal of cortisol in the player, which wreaks havoc on muscle development and fat deposition. This is critical during the physical maturation years of 12-21.
 

Upcoming Events

Oregon Arms Collectors February Gun Show
Portland, OR
Central Oregon Sportsmen's show
Redmond, OR
Rickreall Gun Show
Rickreall, OR

New Resource Reviews

New Classified Ads

Back Top