Quantcast
  1. Sign up now and join over 35,000 northwest gun owners. It's quick, easy, and 100% free!

Storing powder/primers

Discussion in 'Ammunition & Reloading' started by Grommit327, Jan 27, 2012.

  1. Grommit327

    Grommit327 Buckley Active Member

    Messages:
    304
    Likes Received:
    74
    Ok so I have to do something that is going to kill me. I am moving to the south sound area in a couple months and will be living the apartment life for awhile. This means I have to break down my reloading setup at my current place and store it until I have time to buy a house up there.

    Now I have several jugs of powder that will need to be stored along with several thousand primers. What's the best way to go about this as pretty much all of the jugs have been opened and a bit used from them? I was thinking about building a metal lock box and storing them inside with some kind of dessicant maybe.

    My plan is to do a mass reloading session for the calibers I will be shooting before I break my press down. Unfortunately I will be 2 hours away from all of my equipment and most;) of my guns
     
  2. Mark W.

    Mark W. Silverton, OR Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

    Messages:
    5,768
    Likes Received:
    4,943
    Powder needs to be cool and dry. Not much more. I wouldn't put it in a sealed metal container as that is just a big bomb. Make sure the little gaskets in the cans or bottles are good and tighten the lids. As to the primers You could slip the whole box into a large baggie and throw a couple silica bags in there.

    I have powder that has been stored in a house at between 45 and 100 degrees since the mid 1960s that is working as well as new powder bought this year. Same with Primers. I would suggest something more like a wooden army foot locker type box for the stuff to go into. And not worry.
     
  3. AMProducts

    AMProducts Maple Valley, WA Jerk, Ammo Manufacturer Silver Supporter

    Messages:
    2,800
    Likes Received:
    1,854
    Primers should be stored in the original packaging, and kept away from moisture and hot weather, I usually line an ammo can with cardboard and put it in there. Powder can be stored in a similar fashion. Also, be sure you are not putting this into a storage unit, as that's a big no-no under most circumstances.
     
  4. Grommit327

    Grommit327 Buckley Active Member

    Messages:
    304
    Likes Received:
    74
    Nope, none of it is going in a storage unit. Mostly worried about the primers since the powder will be pretty much sealed in the jugs. Probably throw the primers in an ammo can with a silica pack. Looks like my dad is going to store it all for me in his tack room which is fairly dry and heated
     
  5. deadshot2

    deadshot2 NW Quadrant WA State Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,407
    Likes Received:
    537
    I've never gone to a lot of trouble to store powder or primers other than the basic safety practices. I keep them in a compartment on the back of my reloading bench.

    One thing to consider is the State of Washington has limits on how many primers and how many pounds of powder can be stored in a residence. I believe it's 25k of primers and 50 lbs of powder. Any more has to be stored in a "Magazine" which merely consists of a box constructed of 3/4" plywood.

    As for all the "moisture control" like sealing in bags or ammo cans with dessicant, that would be more for super long term storage. Under normal temperatures and humidity like we see here in the PNW I've never experienced any primer or powder issues just storing on the shelf. I've loaded using primers and powder I bought 30 years ago and the rounds were just fine.

    I'd only be worried about security if the powder and primers are stored in a "tack room". A good old fashioned Army footlocker with lock will keep the casually tempted away. For those who are determined there's not much that will stop them.