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OK, this may seem random. This evening I sold a vintage Civil Defense book on the Intratubes. I, normally, wouldn't, but moving around various assets. Whilst at the preparedness bookshelf, I came across an actually pretty informative book I read a few years back:

libro de la milicia.jpg

The text covers community-level preparedness for a rural or suburban community. It does indeed cover defense and offers suggestions.

Which leads me to my question: if you were tasked to create a standards document for a community defense force, what would it be for:

  1. Primary rifle.
  2. Sidearms. (If one would bother with attempting to standardize.)
  3. Support weapons, but keep in mind this would be limited to commonly available civilian arms.
  4. Parts, optics, etc.
  5. Web gear, accoutrements, armor, et al.
Enjoy! :)
 

s1xty7

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If arming a community, I'd want commonality of ammunition and magazines. I'd focus on cheap, reliable, commonly available firearms. Mossberg 500 (or Maverick 88s to save a few bucks) in 12GA, Anderson (or PSA, Aero, etc) AR-15 in 5.56, Glock 17/19 in 9mm. Those sorts of things. Frankly, I'd be tempted to go the Glock route (perhaps police trade-ins) and if long arms were needed, some sort of 9mm carbine or AR-9. Then buy enough Glock magazines and pallets of 9mm. Top it off with slings, holsters, likely iron sights or red dots for those where iron sights weren't really an option. I'd buy up a ton of repair items and a number of complete spare firearms for each one I standardized on. After that, focus on training.
 

DSAPT9

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Per the original question you are creating a small militia “community-level preparedness” meaning at least in my option some form of commonality. So, if this true just like most police/military forces you want at least most folks running the same type of fire arm.

Some Reasons:

Familiarity so if you go down the next guy can pick up and use your firearm without major cross training and later your gun can be used by another or as spare parts. I know it’s a heartless thought.

Common magazines so they can be exchanged between individuals

Common ammo so can be exchanged between individuals

Now I do not feel that you all need to have the exact same gun but more of a standard format like AR15 or AK. So, if you want a Colt, BCM, Ruger, S&W or a Palmetto with a 10 in, 16 in, or 20 in barrel that is up to you but all the training would be the same and so would the controls, mags, spare parts and ammo.

Now I do not feel this should be a community purchase unless they vote and choose to but more of a hay if you want to be a part of the team here is the minimum requirements you want to have.

Hand guns and Shot guns even in the military are specialized weapons not issued to every troop so even though it would be nice if it was standardized it is not required in my opinion.

If I where doing the document my minimum list would be:

AR15 in 5.56 of good quality with a minimum of 10 mags per rifle

chest rig or plate carrier able to carry 6 secure but easily accessible mags

a basic med kit and a tourniquet to patch you up if your wounded.

Minimum 1000rds of 5.56/223 at the ready at all time

This is my minimum but I would have a list of suggested Items as well that would help in a bad situation.

These are just my first thoughts as I could do this all day but it would be based on the community and how active they are to protect themselves.

We all want to be prepared but most do not have a large about of disposable income to get the extras so a minimum would be a good start.

Reason for ten mags is they will get worn out and damaged over time so having 3 extra means you can maintain at least 7 good ones at all times.
 
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I think that list of needs a training firearm. Sure you can set up a neighborhood to own the same things for the sake of continuity, but many will likely still need some actual training come an event where that community might need to use that gear.

In the case one picks the venerable AR15, something like a 15-22 should also be required.
 

DSAPT9

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I think that list of needs a training firearm. Sure you can set up a neighborhood to own the same things for the sake of continuity, but many will likely still need some actual training come an event where that community might need to use that gear.

In the case one picks the venerable AR15, something like a 15-22 should also be required.
Now I do not feel that you all need to have the exact same gun but more of a standard format like AR15 or AK. So, if you want a Colt, BCM, Ruger, S&W or a Palmetto with a 10 in, 16 in, or 20 in barrel that is up to you but all the training would be the same and so would the controls, mags, spare parts and ammo.
I guess I did not state it but suggested it in this line in a small way "all the training would be the same" but I do agree that all the toys in the world do no good with out training and yes several 15-22s would be a good start.
 
General "ease" of operation, commonality, cost & availability.

As other folks mentioned, likely inexpensive AR15 type long guns, along with striker semi auto handguns.

Likely more specialized would be larger caliber center fire semiautomatic rifles, shotguns, and precision bolt guns. In my mind.

I include shotguns in the more specialized realm in this context, because that would be their users role. More specialized. Without any experience, I'd think such could be useful if breaching were needed, or manning controlled checkpoints.

As towards the accesories, optics and the like? Sure. Again though, general "ease" of operation, commonality, cost & availability. So throw in a carrier and level 3+ for each, 3x optics (iron backuos), mags, ammo etc. Higher magnification variable optics for the "specialized" level etc.

So, yeah, a militia. Which every patriot is already...a militia man or woman.

Quite unfortunate that the mention of an organized militia is commonly skewed disparagingly. To the point today that I believe organizing & training in Oregon is against State Law (I think during that absurd Rajneeshee cult crud in the 1980's)...
 
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First, I'd have to convince my community to buy a gun at all, forget a decent one because they spend all their money on "coexist" BS. in short, my community can't agree on the wetness of water so for me, this idea is dead on arrival. Too bad.
 
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I'll play...


Since the idea is commonality, it needs to be something readily available, reliable, and with a parts / ammunition supply that is readily available, even if thru "battlefield pickups"

#1 - America's most popular rifle, the AR-15. Every man supplies their own - but if it's an AR, the guts are pretty much the same, working on them (having someone who knows how to fix them is a must) is the same, magazines should be the same, and if you go with 5.56mm chambers, or .223 Wylde, then any ammunition of 5.56/.223 will work just fine.

#2 - I don't think I'd standardize on a gun, because its too hard to get people to pick one manufacturer, but I'd settle on a given caliber. 9mm would be my first pick, .45ACP my 2nd, or .40SW my third. I would set minimum quality standards so you don't have people relying on dangerous or junk pistols. Ammunition, and maybe mags / spare guns could again be "battlefield pickups" too. IF you could herd all the cats - then I'd go with Glock just because most gun shops probably have parts of one form or another for them.

#3 You have to have some dudes with shotguns. If we're talking civil defense force, the shotgun is the most versatile because of the ammunition available. I may even say that I'd rather outfit most dudes with shotguns, vs AR's because you can get into a quality shotgun for less than most entry level AR's. A Mossberg Maverick 88 is less than $300 and will eat anything you give it that fits in the chamber and its a solidly built gun and simple to run. If we're talking TEOTWAKI - the shotgun can be used for defense/offense roles, food gathering from squirrels to elk,

I'd also say some .22 lr rifles - preferably bolt action because of their more reliable nature vs .22 semi autos would be preferable. Savage, Ruger, Mossberg, and Marlin all make magazine fed bolt action .22's. The Ruger American Rimfire would be my choice - you can use the flush 10 round mag, or go crazy and slap a drum mag that fits a 10/22 in there. These can be used for food collection, dispatching varmints / wild animals. They can take out street lights if necessary, and their light recoil and accurate nature would make them suitable for small statured adults, children, or those who are very new to firearms handling and use.

Having larger caliber center fire bolt action rifles would be good too - food collection, sniper / designated marksman or again, give it to someone who isn't as up on firearms handling. Just like the Russians gave conscripts a Mosin and a handful of ammo. Easier to show them how to run a bolt gun than a semi auto. Standard caliber - .270, .308, or .30-06. If you live in an area with lots of jacked up trucks, flat bill cap wearing dudes, and Instagram influencers, add 6.5 Creedmore to the list :s0140:

#4 - the designated "armorer" or tinkerer mentioned in #1 could be tasked with holding a supply of parts. Basic AR parts - pins, springs, triggers, bolts / bolt carriers / firing pins / gas tubes. Maybe some Glock parts - recoil spring assemblies, extractors / ejectors / trigger springs or trigger groups. What else is there to break on a Glock? Maybe also have spare magazine springs for AR's and Glocks.

As for optics - I guess leave that to the individual. What works for me won't necessarily work for someone else. I recently ditched my red dot on the AR to an LVPO because of my eye sight. I also put a red dot on my carry pistol because of same. Just make sure anyone using an optic knows how to zero the gun, and recheck zero, how to adjust windage / elevation and is familiar with their optic of choice.

Everyone carrying a gun needs a basic IFAK at least and basic training on how to use the gear within (TQ, gauze, etc)

Everyone needs at least one or two dependable flash lights, preferably a bright light to ID potential threats at a distance, and a smaller work-light that won't blind you for administrative use. If they can be outfitted with red and green filters, so much the better. They can be used for signalling as well as typical flashlight tasks.

Communications equipment is mandatory too. FRS radios at minimum, portable CB's, HAM radios would be even better. In a real SHTF scenario licensing goes out the window, just have everyone on a designated frequency, know some alternates in case of too much radio traffic or for security reasons, and make sure they know how to operate their radios. Don't rely on cell phones, land lines (since most are digital anyway these days, and won't work without power) - and stick to plain language on the radios to make communication as simple and effective as possible. Designated teams can always develop their own codes or short hand or use 10-codes if they all know them (and know the same set of 10-codes)

#5 - Armor / web gear - you could *try* to standardize, but again, I think that'd be an exercise in herding cats. You could try to get everyone to at least pick up some milsurp 90's (or earlier) era web gear, an ALICE pack, vest with pouches to hold 4 rifle mags, maybe an extra pistol mag, light, and IFAK and anything else that is "mission" specific. You could try to get everyone who is "first line" to get at least some basic AR500 armor because some body armor is better than none if you reasonably expect hostile contact.

Above all else though - the group needs training, they need to train together, and they need to form that "team" mindset and know they can depend on one another. They need to train medical together, they need to train signals together, communications, and of course, firearms use and tactics.
 

3MTA3

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In a way I've already done it - I have enough firearms and ammunition/mags to see my neighborhood through a couple of bad conflicts. I have a good understanding on where my neighbors are in terms of gun ownership and the mentality needed to cope with adverse conditions beyond their control. AR platform in NATO cartridges for the most part, but obviously anything that shoots anything including arrows and rocks in a pinch.

I also have comms, first aid, and a plan to secure the neighborhood if it gets to that, obviously with mutual cooperation and agreement between neighbors.

"No man is an island" is especially true if you live in suburban or denser areas. This goes FAR beyond firearms.

If I had an option to set a standard it would be civilian equivalents of common military weapons using NATO standard cartridges. This would also be based on the weapon types issued to various group sizes for the same reasons .mil uses,

BTW in most or all states every male from 18 to 45 is part of the Unorganized State Militia and can be activated by order of the Governor. Here is Oregon's law on that: https://oregon.public.law/statutes/ors_396.105

IMO this being the case every able bodied male in that age range should have and be proficient with a service weapon.
 
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OK, this may seem random. This evening I sold a vintage Civil Defense book on the Intratubes. I, normally, wouldn't, but moving around various assets. Whilst at the preparedness bookshelf, I came across an actually pretty informative book I read a few years back:

View attachment 1058502

The text covers community-level preparedness for a rural or suburban community. It does indeed cover defense and offers suggestions.

Which leads me to my question: if you were tasked to create a standards document for a community defense force, what would it be for:

  1. Primary rifle.
  2. Sidearms. (If one would bother with attempting to standardize.)
  3. Support weapons, but keep in mind this would be limited to commonly available civilian arms.
  4. Parts, optics, etc.
  5. Web gear, accoutrements, armor, et al.
Enjoy! :)
As far as support weapons hard to argue with the RPK (that us civillian can get ahold of. Takes most AK parts, mags and ammo. With modern developments mounting accessories is easy if needed. Not too heavy to lug around, you can get 40 and 75rd mags if more firepower is needed.
 
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