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Springfield Trapdoor question

Discussion in 'General Firearm Discussion' started by taylor, Apr 17, 2013.

  1. taylor

    taylor Willamette Valley Well-Known Member

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    I bought a 1873 Trapdoor from GB and I've spent the past few days scrubbing the bore, its getting bright now but still a lot a long ways to go. I noticed up near the muzzle some "scratch rings" like a spiral or a jacketed bullet that spun to fast cutting into the bore, what could that be? do you think it will hurt accuracy?
    Also what do you recommend to get all this lead and carbon out?
     
  2. speeddemon94

    speeddemon94 The Rogue Well-Known Member

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    Someone may have damaged it by being careless with a metal cleaning rod?

    And good old nitro solvent.
     
  3. ogre

    ogre Vancouver, WA Well-Known Member

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    I like this answer. Ed's Red, plenty of elbow grease, and bronze cleaning brushes will also work. I think that the condition of the crown will have a much greater effect your accuracy then some "scratch rings" near the muzzle.

    Did you get a carbine or a rifle?
     
  4. taylor

    taylor Willamette Valley Well-Known Member

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    Its a sporterized trapdoor. The barrel is full length and everything seems to work OK, the stock is cut off a couple inches in front of rear barrel band. I found a place that sells forestocks for $60 but I'll probably keep as a Sporter. I also bought the Fox book on loading a trapdoor and some dies.
    I don't have a vice or mold to hold the beast and its really difficult cleaning otherwise. Plus I need to buy a really solid rod to clean, mine buckles when I ram it down.
     
  5. Simonpie

    Simonpie Portland Active Member

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    Over the years it has probably been shot with lead, copper, blackpowder and smokeless. Crud in layers needs to be worked at in cycles of soapy water, solvent, and copper remover. I don’t usually like abrasives in a rifle, but in something that’s pretty far gone, the JB paste can help. Also, check this out:
    Developing the Trapdoor Springfield: Getting the lead out.
     
  6. taylor

    taylor Willamette Valley Well-Known Member

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    That's very interesting about the brake cleaner. On my new Percussion revolvers I wrap a wet patch around a bronze brush and coat with bon-ami and scrub the bore about 20 times it always comes out black and gets all the preservative crap out, its non abrasive. Maybe I'll try it later or the JB paste.
     
  7. Capn Jack

    Capn Jack Wet-Stern Washington Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

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    I used to detail strip my cap and ball revolvers and scrub all of the parts in hot soapy water.
    After drying all parts were soaked in Hoppe's #9 and re-assembled.

    For rifle barrels, I took them off, and put one end in a bucket of hot soapy water and pulled
    a patch up and down in the barrel. Thoroughly dry and soak with Hoppe's #9

    Do not use a strong laundry detergent as it will eat off the bluing.:paranoid:

    Jack...:cool:
     
  8. tac

    tac UK, Oregon and Ontario. Well-Known Member

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    That is likely a ham-fisted operator and a modern steel cleaning rod damaging the old and more easily-damaged quality steel of your original barrel. All the advice you've had so far is good.

    tac