Spingfield 1903 safety

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I just acquired a sporterized Springfield 1903. The safety lever has extra clearance laterally, once the bolt is cycled, the safety lever must be pushed forward( a heavy 1/16th") to engage the safety up. Any help in tightening up this clearance would be greatly appreciated.

On another note, am I safe to assume that the lower mag well follower is typically "crimped" to the flat mag spring. As this is also loose.

Thanks.
 
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Howdy from another victim of sporterizing.
Some things to know about 1903's. Check you serial number against this list
SPRINGFIELD ARMORY US MODEL 1903 RIFLE SERIAL NUMBER RANGES
Prior to s/n 800,000 apporoximately there was heat treating issue. There are people who say don't shoot them. But
i am of the opinion if you have a low s/n just run factory ammo and you will be pretty safe. I just read a very complete analysis of the whole issue and have decided that my 1903 will be safe with factory ammo only. It has a proven history of bringing down elk in Colorado and is a straight shooter.

Now as to your issues
I am confused by the terms you are using? "lower mag well follower is typically "crimped" to the flat mag spring"
there is one follower, it is attached to the spring by an eye on the bottom of the follower. The spring attaches to the floor plate, see the linked diagram
<broken link removed>

As to your Safety question: take it to a gunsmith and ask. I am not familiar enough with the rifle to answer that other that I doesn't sound right to me.
Here is a link for a PDF of a M1903 manual,read it carefully.
United States Rifle, Cal .30, Model 1903 Manual

The 1903 is a wonderful rifle, and has some interesting features.
Enjoy it
 
OP
W
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After removing the scope mounts on this Sporterized 1903, reveals US Springfield Armory 1903 s/n 2170. No b.s. ! 2170.
Action is chambered 30-06 barrel. Never plan on running any thing other than factory ammo.
A new spring and follower solved that issue. It looks to have a timney buehler type safety device, I suspect a new internal nylon pin should tighten up the wiggle in the safety lever.
Thanks for your initial reply.
 
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Here is some information that might help you understand the "Low Serial Number" issue with 1903's.

*WARNING ON "LOW-NUMBER" SPRINGFIELDS
M1903 rifles made before February 1918 utilized receivers and bolts which were single heat-treated by a method that rendered some of them brittle and liable to fracture when fired, exposing the shooter to a risk of serious injury. It proved impossible to determine, without destructive testing, which receivers and bolts were so affected and therefore potentially dangerous.

To solve this problem, the Ordnance Department commenced double heat treatment of receivers and bolts. This was commenced at Springfield Armory at approximately serial number 800,000, and at Rock Island Arsenal at exactly serial number 285,507. All Springfields made after this change are commonly called "high number" rifles. Those Springfields made before this change are commonly called "low-number" rifles.

In view of the safety risk the Ordnance Department withdrew from active service all "low-number" Springfields. During WWII, however, the urgent need for rifles resulted in the rebuilding and reissuing of many "low-number" as well as "high-number" Springfields. The bolts from such rifles were often mixed during rebuilding, and did not necessarily remain with the original receiver.

Generally speaking, "low number" bolts can be distinguished from "high-number" bolts by the angle at which the bolt handle is bent down. All "low number" bolts have the bolt handle bent straight down, perpendicular to the axis of the bolt body. High number bolts have "swept-back" (or slightly rearward curved) bolt handles.

A few straight-bent bolts are of the double heat-treat type, but these are not easily identified, and until positively proved otherwise ANY straight-bent bolt should be assumed to be "low number". All original swept-back bolts are definitely "high number". In addition, any bolt marked "N.S." (for nickel steel) can be safely regarded as "high number" if obtained directly from CMP (beware of re-marked fakes).

CMP DOES NOT RECOMMEND FIRING ANY SPRINGFIELD RIFLE WITH A "LOW NUMBER" RECEIVER. Such rifles should be regarded as collector's items, not "shooters".

CMP ALSO DOES NOT RECOMMEND FIRING ANY SPRINGFIELD RIFLE, REGARDLESS OF SERIAL NUMBER, WITH A SINGLE HEAT-TREATed "LOW NUMBER" BOLT. SUCH BOLTS, WHILE HISTORICALLY CORRECT FOR DISPLAY WITH A RIFLE OF WWI OR EARLIER VINTAGE, MAY BE DANGEROUS TO USE FOR SHOOTING.

THE UNITED STATES ARMY GENERALLY DID NOT SERIALIZE BOLTS. DO NOT RELY ON ANY SERIAL NUMBER APPEARING ON A BOLT TO DETERMINE WHETHER SUCH BOLT IS "HIGH NUMBER" OR "LOW NUMBER".
The key sentences are
: "M1903 rifles made before February 1918 utilized receivers and bolts which were single heat-treated by a method that rendered some of them brittle and liable to fracture when fired, exposing the shooter to a risk of serious injury. It proved impossible to determine, without destructive testing, which receivers and bolts were so affected and therefore potentially dangerous.

Contrary to using Factory ammo only, which I have found often pushes the limits of pressure, I would consider loading a low pressure round that just had enough speed to get the job at hand done. If you plan on hunting with this rifle, rather than shooting rounds that are capable of hitting targets with great impact at 500-600 yards, I'd consider using it for a 200-300 yard "Deer Rifle". 47grains of Winchester 748 powder with a 150 grain bullet gives one a nice low pressure round (<46,000 CUP which is considerably less than the max for this cartridge) that still travels near the original speed for the military round this rifle was designed for.

With a serial no that low, it sounds like someone ruined a perfectly good collectible.
 

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