Sniper / Long Distance Shooting Book

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Please give your recommendations on a good "manual" for long distance shooting. Whether it's a FM / Military Training Guide or a civilian book about the subject that assumes the shooter is starting from a beginning level. Proficient with firearms but ignorant of proven methods for long distance shooting. By long distance I mean above 200 to 250 yds to 1000.

I think it would be really interesting to get into pulling off some serious long distance shots for fun. Unfortunately I don't have the possibility of owning a .50 caliber so I'm going to have to go with the reliable 30.06 deer rifle. It would also be cool to learn some actual sniper techniques and training as well.
 
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You can also download it from various sites on the WWW for free.

I may already have it in a PDF file,will take a look and see. If i do,can email it to those that want it.
 
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Please give your recommendations on a good "manual" for long distance shooting. Whether it's a FM / Military Training Guide or a civilian book about the subject that assumes the shooter is starting from a beginning level. Proficient with firearms but ignorant of proven methods for long distance shooting. By long distance I mean above 200 to 250 yds to 1000.

I think it would be really interesting to get into pulling off some serious long distance shots for fun. Unfortunately I don't have the possibility of owning a .50 caliber so I'm going to have to go with the reliable 30.06 deer rifle. It would also be cool to learn some actual sniper techniques and training as well.

How come you can't buy a .50? The single shot bolt action ones aren't cheap but they aren't prohibitively expensive and this ain't California.

Also, I'll take a look at that manual too, I am interested in learning to shoot things at 1000 yards as well.
 

parallax

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I've always enjoyed the book, the ultimate sniper, by major john plaster.
one note about this book,, the ballistics are not quite right..223/7.62/.50cal..(off a little)
perhaps its done intentionally?...but its got alot of good basic information.
 
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Check out the Army's sniper manual. It's only a few bucks most places. I got mine off of IMS-Plus for $5 a while back... it might have gone up in price, can' say.

Is it the FM-23? I just looked through all my downloaded garbage and found it in there.
 
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How come you can't buy a .50? The single shot bolt action ones aren't cheap but they aren't prohibitively expensive and this ain't California.

Also, I'll take a look at that manual too, I am interested in learning to shoot things at 1000 yards as well.

Have any good suggestions for a decent quality lower priced one? It would be a possibility at some point, just not in the near future. I suppose I could look it up and build one. But for now I'll have to deal with the .06. I want to start learning fundamentals now.
 
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Please give your recommendations on a good "manual" for long distance shooting. Whether it's a FM / Military Training Guide or a civilian book about the subject that assumes the shooter is starting from a beginning level. Proficient with firearms but ignorant of proven methods for long distance shooting. By long distance I mean above 200 to 250 yds to 1000.

I think it would be really interesting to get into pulling off some serious long distance shots for fun. Unfortunately I don't have the possibility of owning a .50 caliber so I'm going to have to go with the reliable 30.06 deer rifle. It would also be cool to learn some actual sniper techniques and training as well.

You want FM 23-10, Section IV (Range Estimation)

Click HERE to download military FMs for free...scroll down to FM 23-10

Also, 1,000 yards is no easy task.

Once you factor in how to correctly estimate for range, you need to figure in your own ballistic table to make a rifle ballistic card.

What I mean is, find out (specifically) the calliber of rifle you are shooting, factor in what grain of bullet you use and find out the bullet drop for that particular calliber at a given distance.

For example, find out the drop (in MOAs) per calliber...

30calCOMPAREdropMOA.png
(example of a ballistic table)

Compare the table (to your specific calliber and grain) to that of your actual rifle (or at least one with a similar barrel length). Fire at a KNOWN DISTANCE simular to the table you have researched and adjust the difference in the tables to that of your own rifle. Then, factor in the angle of trajectory, wind and humidity for your specific climate and you should be able to hit the broad side of a barn at 1,000 yards.

Is this information what you are looking for? I can't give you an accurate ballistic table without knowing specifically what rifle, calliber and grain of bullet you are intending to shoot (I know you mentioned the 30-06, breifly, but please be more specific).

For long distances (700 yards and up) I would actually suggest a heavier calliber (like a .300 Win Mag) because it is less effected by the forementioned effects (gravity, wind, humidity). The .338 Lapua is one of the king rounds in the long distance area due to its bullet speed and weight.


Hope this helps...
 
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i like the idea of shooterready because it gives you the ability to practice your skills, and for a novice like my self who is starting out in precision long range shooting, it provides some additional range time. with out the cost of ammo.
 
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I had shooterready when I knew nothing about ranging and shooting. All it does is allow you to learn the math in your head. You can do that by driving around and ranging stuff and you will be a lot better at it than looking at a 2 dimensional screen.

Reading the wind is not the same as reading flags or adjusting for a 1 way offset. There is no substitute for actual field time, even if you fire nothing and just glass all day.

If you stick with the sport, tell I'm wrong about SR after a 1K of rounds down range and a few competitions under your belt.
 
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oh i agree nothing replaces actual feild time, but always having studying material for rain days aren't a bad thing, oh and for a book that would be good for a "Sniper / Long Distance Shooting Book" go to sniperworld and go under manuals. they have a few good marksmanship manuals in there.
 
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I really enjoyed WITH BRITISH SNIPERS TO THE REICH, by Captain C. Shore.
The writer worked as a sniper on the Western front during WWII. He also set up and taught at sniping schools. While the book is a little dated for equipment ( rifles ) it still has excellent chapters on training, fieldcraft and mindset. Andy
 
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If you know the four fundamentals, the majority of your work is going to be honing those pieces of the puzzle. Review of the fundamentals can be gained from the aforementioned FMs, including the SOTIC manual and Marine sniping manual, FM 1-3B. Dry fire practice will help work through the fundamentals for a lot less $$. When it comes time to send rounds you will need some ballistic data to get you in the ballpark, or a good spotter.
Shooter Ready is a good tool to introduce range estimation using the mil based reticle, and adjusting based off a data card. I used it before I went to school, and it helped with ranging. It doesn't help with wind though, the only thing that helps with wind is doing it. You have to see the mirage/indicators and shoot in it. Are you talking about learning fieldcraft as well, or just long-range shooting?
Jason
 

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