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Hong Kong Customs on March 27 detected a suspected case of large-scale gold smuggling involving air freight, and seized about 146 kilograms of suspected gold with an estimated market value of about $84 million, at Hong Kong International Airport. Photo shows the suspected smuggled gold which was moulded and camouflaged as air compressor parts. CUSTOMS AND EXCISE DEPARTMENT HONG KONG
 
That's pretty clever. Would have been even moreso if they shipped mostly real parts with a couple gold ones mixed in. For $84M you could eat a lot of extra freight charges
 
That's pretty clever. Would have been even moreso if they shipped mostly real parts with a couple gold ones mixed in. For $84M you could eat a lot of extra freight charges
This is what I was thinking. Why ship it all at once? It seems to me that smaller shipments would be easier to get away with, but you'd need multiple points of origin. On the other hand, I'm not well read on smuggling techniques.
 
That's an indication that their X-Ray scanners have sensors and software that will do X-Ray fluorescence spectroscopy. It's useful for detecting nuclear material.
The signature for gold is significantly higher than copper, aluminum or iron. Had they sent it as raw Tungsten for tooling, customs might have overlooked it.
 
Brazil stopped gold smuggling in it's tracks by paying more then the going international gold rate.

Very smart when you consider that they just print more Brazilian Real currency.
 
That's an indication that their X-Ray scanners have sensors and software that will do X-Ray fluorescence spectroscopy. It's useful for detecting nuclear material.
The signature for gold is significantly higher than copper, aluminum or iron. Had they sent it as raw Tungsten for tooling, customs might have overlooked it.
Or a simple magnet
 
The article didn't make it clear if customs at Hong Kong were doing anything more than a routine examination of outgoing air freight, but the article did report that the customs officials' WTF discovery had apparently exposed
" . . . an attempt to evade Japan's precious metals tariff that would have cost smugglers around $1.07 million".
 

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