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I love LOVE LOVE my s&w revolvers, especially J and K frames, but I will not buy one online because I had too many issues with their QC, and what they allow out of the door. M&Ps are solid and I tried a few through the years (aside from the fact that I still want to shake hands with the cretin who designed a slide from scratch that requires the rear sight to be drifted in order to remove the striker safety plunger, at least on the non CORE/optic ready models) Anyway, I digress, but the latest CSX is a terrible thing, and i don't even want to touch that Shield EZ with the ghetto makeover, what is it called? The equestrian?
I never tried a s&w 1911, maybe someday I will.
 
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Tell that to the revolver line, they can’t make them fast enough.
Smith & Wesson has been neglecting revolver production for many years. Simply because demand across their market (which includes law enforcement sales) has favored their semi auto pistol product. Pistols are typically easier to manufacture and generate more profit per unit. In the past decade, revolver production has been approximately 20-25% of their production. The Covid era problems may have dipped revolver production lower. Combined with 2020 panic buying, you might find the answer to be found in higher demand for revolver product at a time when supplies were low. Smith & Wesson still offers a pretty extensive catalog of revolver product, and I can imagine that keeping them all available for distribution would be a challenge. Just now, I checked Gunbroker and there are scads of new Smith & Wesson revolvers on offer there.

I love LOVE LOVE my s&w revolvers, especially J and K frames, but I will not buy one online because I had too many issues with their QC, and what they allow out of the door.
Unfortunately, I have to agree. The last few new Smith & Wesson revolvers that I bought all came complete with nagging quality issues. In spite of being made on modern CNC production process. Which supposedly lowers the probability of human error in manufacturing. Yet introduces new avenues of error.
 
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As to the 47% drop in sales, that's to be expected. Covid era panic buying wasn't going to last. Bubbles of panic buying from pending anti-gun legislation come and go. Demand cycles are normal.

Relocating their main manufacturing plant from Mass. to Tenn. may or may not turn out to be a good move. Surely there was a practical financial reason (leaving a high tax state) and some political statement (leaving an anti-gun state). As it turns out, they are doing it as the demand bubble has burst. Yet this will be a good time for them to trim their workforce, as many of their Mass. workers won't want to relocate and the company won't have to replace them in Tenn.
 

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