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Slugged my Tokarev barrel

Discussion in 'Ammunition & Reloading' started by taylor, Jun 22, 2012.

  1. taylor

    taylor Willamette Valley Well-Known Member

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    And the grooves were .314 and the lands were .302, thats a .012 difference!
    But whats surprising is I get OK accuracy with it. What if I was to try some .32 acp bullets? somewhere around .312?
    When they designed this gun they must have figured on nobody cleaning their barrels and filling with mud and still having some rifleing for the bullet to grab.
     
  2. deadshot2

    deadshot2 NW Quadrant WA State Well-Known Member

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    Might be OK as the bullet's only .001" larger in diameter. Definitely work up the load.

    Who knows what the logic was for such deep grooves but bear in mind that a bullet obturates when fired, From the base forward a portion of the bullet will "mushroom" somewhat, this filling the grooves. Try recovering a fired bullet from a tank/barrel of water and see what the actual groove measurement is on the fired bullet. That will give you an idea as to how well the bullet is "filling the barrel" when fired. That round is pretty potent. Much like a .357 magnum or .357 Sig. I'm sure that you'll be surprised on what a fired bullet will look like.
     
  3. taylor

    taylor Willamette Valley Well-Known Member

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    Thanks, thats a great idea about recovering a spent bullet. If only we had some snow.
    Penn Bullets has some Tokarev extra hard cast that are rated to 1800fps and will sell them sized large so that might be a way to go.
     
  4. deadshot2

    deadshot2 NW Quadrant WA State Well-Known Member

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    A barrel full of water inside a garden shed. Now's a good time to do so as July 4th is just around the corner. The neighbors would just blame it on a large firecracker.

    Another way that a local gunsmith used is a piece of 12" diameter steel culvert pipe. Attach a barrel to one end, which is filled with water. The other end is inserted in a hole in the side of your workshop. The pipe slopes down at a 45 degree angle A hatch can be cut in the side of the barrel, above the water line, for recovering the lead with a fish tank net or even a stick with beeswax melted onto the end. Rifle bullets are, as a rule, too fast and fragment badly. Pistol bullets come out nice and clean with only the HP's mushroomed. The pipe will muffle almost all the noise, especially if it's capped with a piece of insulation material with a hole just big enough for the muzzle. Great way to test repaired pistols without having to go to the range.