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Silver US Coins/Presidential Coins/Old 5 Dollar Bill

Discussion in 'Non-Firearm Item Classifieds' started by chiefchip, Nov 4, 2009.

  1. chiefchip

    chiefchip Rainier, Oregon Member

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  2. Pukwudji

    Pukwudji Hillsboro, OR Member

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    I'm not a collector but here's a little info for you. I'd suggest going to a coin shop and see what they'll give you. You could sell to them or mark up a few percent and sell yourself.




    Kennedy Half Dollars

    Kennedy half dollars were first produced in 1964. Half dollars that bear the 1964 date are 90% silver, and carry a numismatic premium based on the current price of silver. In 1965 the amount of silver used in the production of Kennedy halves was decreased to 40%, and this specification was used until 1970. Kennedy halves dated 1971 and later contain no silver and do not command a numismatic premium. In order to evaluate the current value of your Kennedy half dollars, multiply the current market price for silver by 0.36169 for 1964 issues, and by 0.1479 for all issues 1965 to 1970.


    Silver Coins 1964 and Earlier

    Dimes, Quarters and Halves dating 1964 and earlier contain 90% silver. The vast majority of circulated coins that date from the mid 1930's to 1964 are bought and sold as bullion. In circulated condition, these coins trade for roughly the value of the silver they contain, about six times their face value in early 2006.


    Steel Cents

    In 1943, the production of our One Cent coin went through a major change. War efforts that year required copper and its availability was limited. It was decided to change the content from copper to steel coated with zinc for the first run of the new 1943 cents. In 1944, the need for copper was reduced, and the production of the copper cent resumed.

    Over one billion 1943 steel cents were produced at the Philadelphia, Denver, and San Francisco mints, making this a very common coin. However, many people found the new "look" fascinating and saved, rather than spent, the new steel cent. Today, their value ranges from about 5 cents up to about 35 cents in circulated condition. Uncirculated specimens (showing no trace of wear or handling) can bring up to about $10 in high grades.

    An extremely limited number of 1943 cents were inadvertently struck on copper planchets, left in the machinery from the previous year. Very few escaped the mint unnoticed, and these are considered very desirable to collectors. Auction histories indicate the value range of an authentic 1943 copper cent to be from around $5,000 to $70,000, depending on the mint and condition. However, copper-plated forgeries abound. The primary test for these is to use a magnet. The common steel & zinc pieces (and the 1943 copper-plated fakes, as well as authentic cents from other years) will stick to the magnet. The rare copper issues will not.



    I-Brian
     
  3. chiefchip

    chiefchip Rainier, Oregon Member

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    Wow thanks for the info Brian
     
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