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Shooting a M1911a1?

Discussion in 'Handgun Discussion' started by joe dierte, Feb 25, 2013.

  1. joe dierte

    joe dierte issaquah Member

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    I have recently inherited a Remington Rand that I first shot at 8 years old, and I have been shooting it on and off maybe a couple hundred rounds a year. I was just told by a (1911 guy) at a LGS that there was a lack of hardening and I shouldnt be shooting it. I would like a second or third opinion on this as shooting it always makes me smile, but dont want anything to happen to it either. Thanks
     
  2. iamme

    iamme Lane County Well-Known Member

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    Alot of the early guns did not have proper heat treating done for heavy use or hot loads.
     
  3. oldgrappler

    oldgrappler Oregon Member

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    Original Remington Rand is WWII military pistol and collectable if in good shape. I would shoot it occasionally if it was mine.
     
  4. clambo

    clambo Vancouver, Wa. Well-Known Member

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    Shoot it just don't overdo it....sounds like your not. Fine gun, we're all jealous.
     
  5. joe dierte

    joe dierte issaquah Member

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    Thankyou all, It is in great condition and was my grandfathers sidearm as he piloted a B24 over Italy during WWII. It is priceless to me, but I have a hard time with just leaving it in the safe so im glad im ok.
     
  6. techieguy

    techieguy Well-Known Member

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    From what I have read early 1911 (read early WWI pistols) were not properly heat treated and thus the frames where not a durable as they should be, I've never read that WWII pistols (reguardless of manufacture) had frames that where not harded properly.
     
  7. jbett98

    jbett98 NW Oregon Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

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    Remington Rand made some of the best 1911's during the war. By March of 1945 they where building the lowest price pistol in the war effort and quality was considered second to none.
    They came up with the hardening process using molten lead poured over the slide areas prone to cracking.
    Most, if not all National Match pistols made for the Camp Perry Matches were by government armorers using Remington Rands.
    If you can see the dark oily spots on the sides of the slide, then don't worry about shooting normal loads.
    They are great pistols, but the small sights are hard to see if you don't have good vision.
     
    orygun and (deleted member) like this.
  8. joe dierte

    joe dierte issaquah Member

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    I dont see any discolored spots anywhere, but I have it pretty coated in froglube? Is there a way to see if it is the hardened one by number?
     
  9. BSG 75

    BSG 75 Oregon Well-Known Member

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  10. joe dierte

    joe dierte issaquah Member

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    Hmmmm, thankyou for that link, but its brought me back to my original struggle. I would NEVER sell this pistol simply because to me its priceless. It will die with me unless I can trust my kids not to pawn it on T V after Im gone, but I dont want it broken either. I guess Ill just shoot some low power ball through it when I feel I need to. Thanks again everyone
     
  11. beezer66

    beezer66 Salem, OR Active Member

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    Load up some light lead loads and enjoy. I take My grandfather's Colt out and enjoy it. It is a pre a1, built in 1917. I have 3 newer 1911's and nothing compares to that Colt.