Sentimental Firearms

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Ruger Bisley in .41 Mag, 7.5 in. barrel. Was my brothers.
Model 77 in 300 Win Mag. Mag-na-port, bedded and very accurate. Bought it used over 30 years ago from
a retiring Salem gunsmith. Wish I remembered his name.
A Remington model 1 1/2 in .22. Schutzen stock, beautiful wood and checkering. Velzey went through
it for me and made it better. Best date is late 1860's thru middle 70's. Every time I hold it, it's a
speculative trip down memory lane guessing and imagining.
 
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My old duty sidearm from my Executive Protection days in college, a lovingly hand-fitted parts-bin mixmaster 1911. All I have to remember two good years with someone special enough to be worth trading my life for hers by.

(Edit for clarity: We couldn't have worked out in the end, but for a time each of us was exactly what the other needed--she needed someone to stand between her and her ex, and I wouldn't have become the man I am today without her.)
 
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Catherine1

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2 of them. 1 is a German made .25 that was my Grandfathers. When he retired he bought a bar. Got stabbed twice. Grandma finally told him either he carries a gun or he sells the place. He bought the .25. I remember as a kid seeing him pick it up off a shelf in the kitchen to drop it in his pocket before kissing her and heading out to work. Shoot a few rounds through it now and then just for the hell of it. Other I still carry, S/A 1911 my Father bought in late 90's and carried at work for about a decade before he retired and moved out of the country. He is gone now for a good while and I think of him when I holster that pistol.
Where did he move to when he left the USA?

Cate
 

Catherine1

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Good and interesting thread. Thank you!

I do not have a sentimental firearm.

I have bought - late 90's and on, been gifted, loved many past and present firearms of mine but I was not sentimental about them.

That goes for my former and present knives, household goods, etc. too.

I have had and still have FAVORITES in my firearms and knives but I was never sentimental about them.

I do have a couple of sentimental items in my life but not too many.

A couple of TOP favorite books that will stay with me - I scaled down my very LARGE and personal library before my move out west, a couple of Bibles, a USN ring, plain gold wedding bands, 3 simple pieces of classic jewelry that I rarely even wear NOW (A beautiful yet plain gold chain, a set of simple stud earrings, a strand of pearls - necklace circa 1968.), 2 favorite teaspoons, etc.

There are VERY FEW ITEMS aka STUFF in my life that I am super sentimental about NOW and there were only a few of them in the PAST even though I owned far more STUFF (Beautiful and NICE/USEFUL things.) in the past too.

Guns? Favorites? Yes.

Sentimental? NO.

Cate
 
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Catherine1

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Philippines, stayed there till he passed in 2010
I have heard of several people who moved to the PI and other countries and they really loved their retirement in those countries.

Ex pats that I knew/know offline and some online.

That goes for younger people who move out of the USA.

I have given that some thought on and off in my lifetime but not to the PI too.

Nice story about your firearms too.

Take care!

Cate
 

Alexx1401

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I have heard of several people who moved to the PI and other countries and they really loved their retirement in those countries.

Ex pats that I knew/know offline and some online.

That goes for younger people who move out of the USA.

I have given that some thought on and off in my lifetime but not to the PI too.

Nice story about your firearms too.

Take care!

Cate
He loved it. His retirement if he stayed here would have let him live comfortable. There? He was like Jed in that TV show. When he would go to the bank they made people wait in line outside. President would see him and go get him from the line and take him to his office to do what he needed to do. Place was amazing and cheap beyond belief. He had a new home that had just been built, guy came once a week to do the yard, lady came twice a week to clean and do laundry, whole package was less than $300 a month. He lived quite the life the last 8 or so years of his life there. Some little town that was full of people from the US and a couple other countries that moved there just because it was so damn cheap to live there.
 

bbbass

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I have heard of several people who moved to the PI and other countries and they really loved their retirement in those countries.

Ex pats that I knew/know offline and some online.

That goes for younger people who move out of the USA.

I have given that some thought on and off in my lifetime but not to the PI too.

Nice story about your firearms too.

Take care!

Cate

We thought about it, briefly. But there is always some condition that makes it unworkable for us... government, botflys, noseeums, skeeters, snakes/spiders, heat/humidity, no family.

Really, for us there is no place as nice to live as NE OR. Yeah it's cold winters, but that keeps the bugs/spiders down!!

This lil dude from Down Under packs about 10 times the punch of (Latrodectus Hesperus)... Black Widow, but it's called a Red Backed Spider, for obvious reasons. Meet Latrodectus Hasselti:
yImages-641531990-6760518ba3884a6782958b849fb409c2.jpg
 

Catherine1

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Thanx! She's gotten to the point of seeing/hearing things and I really need to start going to the support group. It's living with a stranger... Hey, at least I don't have to wipe her butt, yet.
Prayers said for both of you. I sent you a message.

I have another question about another subject matter when it comes to travel too.

Thanks and take care!

Cate
 
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Mine would be grandpa's old Wards mdl 93m 22 rim fire. That thing is still deadly accurate today with its antique weaver scope. Its my go-to when there's a critter in the yard that needs killed.

Next would be his old Winchester mdl100 in 308. I will forever remember the sound that action makes after climbing out of the truck on a cool October morning.
 
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JRuby

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Mine would be:
My dad's Browning Bar in 30-06
My Grandfathers Winchester 94 in 30-30
A Harrington and Richards top break revolver in 32 from a man that was as close as any uncle could be
My uncles Ruger #1 22 pistol
These guns are not expensive guns but to me are irreplacable, The individuals I hope to see someday but not in this lifetime.
 
I really hope I created another sentimental firearm.

Today was the first time my grandson got to shoot his "new" Marlin.

The first shot.jpg
 
All my firearms are sentimental to me....I mourn over the ones I've sold and hope I don't make the same mistake with the ones I have left!
I have the feeling to some degree.
I have sold a bunch of guns so far in this life. Some I occasionally wish I'd not let go, some I'm glad I'd sent down the road and a couple I'd give my left testicle (well, maybe not that!) to have back in my hands. The ones that came from people who were important to me are the most sentimental ones. Fortunately the only ones of those I let go have been passed along to other family members who will cherish them.
 
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Marlin 60 .22 I got for my 12th birthday. Still have it.
My dads Win 30-30 I found after he died with his army 1911. We thought both were lost in fire/ then water from fire dept. When i took his house down I found them. Rusty and pitted with bullets in chamber. Took them to gunsmith. They got them in shooting condition
 
My Father's Mannlicher-Schoenauer .30-06.

He killed his biggest Whitetail with it, and just about everything else:
View attachment 1113234
Wow - for one, that image is both great and also starting to go. Red dye is the last to start breaking down and fading away. If you’ve got other images from this time that aren’t already digitized, you may want to consider it.
 
My old duty sidearm from my Executive Protection days in college, a lovingly hand-fitted parts-bin mixmaster 1911. All I have to remember two good years with someone special enough to be worth trading my life for hers by.

(Edit for clarity: We couldn't have worked out in the end, but for a time each of us was exactly what the other needed--she needed someone to stand between her and her ex, and I wouldn't have become the man I am today without her.)
 

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