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Seller reports trigger job on 686 8 3/8". What should I do??????

Discussion in 'Handgun Discussion' started by tkdguy, Nov 1, 2013.

  1. tkdguy

    tkdguy Portland, Oregon Silver Supporter Silver Supporter

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    Was going to purchase a 686 8 3/8" with scope when seller reported a gunsmith did a trigger job at 3 pounds double action and less than that single action. The scoped handgun was used for deer hunting in the midwest. Shoots inside of a dime at 25 yards. Price is good, but my anxiety went up. He just purchased a 460 Smith because the 357 was considered too weak for the Whitetails. What advise do you have? the price is attractive. Thanks. tkdguy
     
  2. superdave65

    superdave65 Bremerton, WA Member

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    Check it yourself. Borrow a scale
     
  3. tkdguy

    tkdguy Portland, Oregon Silver Supporter Silver Supporter

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    set about 1/5 pounds. What do you think. This was done so that while hunting the gun could be fired in double action mode without a "click" going off and the White tailed deer running off. A gunsmith--reported to be very competent honed the sear and did not damage the side plate screws during the process. Thanks for all of your advise. The seller seems to be an honest guy.
     
  4. jluck

    jluck Really,Really, Close to Newport Oregon 97365 Voted #1 Member

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    I'd buy it but only if I wanted it. I really don't see a problem. Thousands of guns get trigger jobs and sold. If it is too light have it replaced. I'd try to buffer that in to the price.
     
  5. Skang

    Skang WA Well-Known Member

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    well, what are you going to use it for? and I don't see the problem with the trigger job, long as it's been done correctly.
     
  6. stmcelroy

    stmcelroy Madras, OR Well-Known Member

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    DA at 3# would be way to light, and 1# single action is ridiculous.

    I wouldn't touch it with a 10ft pole, accident waiting to happen.
     
    twoclones and (deleted member) like this.
  7. Velzey

    Velzey Estacada, Oregon Gunsmith Gunsmith Bronze Vendor Bronze Supporter

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    I doubt it is that light of a pull, that seems abit on the light side for consistant strikes. One call to Gunsprings.com and for under $15 you can have a stock or whatever lb spring you want. And I can send you a pm on how to install it without messing up your sideplate!
     
  8. JSJPDX

    JSJPDX East Portland Gold Supporter Gold Supporter

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    Echo the 'what are you going to use it for" comment. If you're looking for a hunter or a target gun, it's probably just fine. If it had a shorter barrel and you were going to carry it for defense, the trigger is way too light. You could always just replace the appropriate parts and have a factory trigger if you're really worried about it.
     
  9. twoclones

    twoclones Tri-Cities, WA Well-Known Member

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    Personally, I prefer to have at least double those numbers but if the price was good, I'd just put in a different spring set to get the weight I wanted.
     
  10. ch139

    ch139 teh gehtoe Active Member

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    RKBA is right on track! Don't recall the specifics, but there is a certain amount of pressure required for the firing pin to break the primer. Having a double-action trigger pull of three pounds is very light = not able to reliably break all primers (IIRC the "lower limit" was about 6lbs DA trigger pull which = something like 38oz at the hammer - has been many years since toying with Smith revolvers though).

    What the OP has posted about what he knows of the revolver in question would make me very suspect of the revolver and seller's claims. First off, would think any competent gunsmith would know the above, understand what is going on inside a revolver and never set a DA trigger pull that light (come to think of it, how would you get it that light, IIRC it takes about that much to just get the cylinder to turn and lock up - really nothing left for the hammer at that point - more to be suspect about the seller's claims). The seller's claim as to having this done so the gun won't "click" is also out there. In DA there are several things going on inside the revolver = several little "clicks" its a mechanical devise and there are parts moving and interacting, its gonna "click."

    Curious as to who this "gunsmith" is... not boogering up the screws on the sideplate is kindergarten level stuff. Honing the sear? What did he hone on the sear? An action job on a Smith revolver is smoothing out all the rough edges (usually sides of parts - there are quite a few and just this does make a huge difference). Wonder what the seller is talking about when he says the gunsmith "honed the sear" (this has nothing to do with a DA trigger pull by the way). The ole "gun show action job" is to back out the strain screw (on the front of the grip frame) to take pressure off the mainspring - lightning up the DA trigger pull and pulling weight off the hammer falling. With a DA trigger pull this light that strain screw is the first place to look, make sure the screw is in as far as it will go.

    A quality action job on a Smith revolver involves opening the revolver (and not buggering the sideplate screws) and stoning some of the parts to a nice smooth surface free of any rough edges or left over tooling nicks, dings, scrapes whatnot. It only takes a little bit of work; you're not trying to get a mirror surface on every little part inside the gun. Lightening up the mainspring and rebound slide spring will help to lower the pull weight a bit too, but as mentioned, the mainspring is what drives the hammer and you don't want that too low. If you're a Smith revolver God like Nelson Ford tweaking the stock springs is great, for the rest of us mortals, just buying the Wolf reduced weight spring from Brownells is the best way to go.

    So, pull the grips off and check the strain screw in the front of the grip frame, make sure it is in there tight. If it is and its a smokin deal I'd get it knowing I might be replacing parts or even sending back to Smith & Wesson or someone like Nelson to be repaired. Without opening it up and understanding whats going on and what this "gunsmith" monkeyed with, there is no way I'd be paying market value. Check that strain screw though, chances are someone has backed it way out.

    If you ever get to Salem, shoot me an IM, this stuff is a lot easier to explain in person and handle a couple revolvers to get the feel of what a wonderful DA Smith revolver action feels like.