Seeking Firearms Job / Career

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Corollary:
Have a spouse with a good job.

The failure rate for gunsmithing businesses makes restaurants look like a lock. Out of my class Jack Huntington was the only success, followed by Marc Krebs in the next class. Even the people who started out with financing by Daddy and a wife with a good job didn't make it. If this discourages you from doing it I just saved you a lot of $ and effort, because you wouldn't have made it anyway. Look at it as a hobby you can do as a side thing if you really want to do it.
 
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solv3nt

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Corollary:
Have a spouse with a good job.

The failure rate for gunsmithing businesses makes restaurants look like a lock. Out of my class Jack Huntington was the only success, followed by Marc Krebs in the next class. Even the people who started out with financing by Daddy and a wife with a good job didn't make it. If this discourages you from doing it I just saved you a lot of $ and effort, because you wouldn't have made it anyway. Look at it as a hobby you can do as a side thing if you really want to do it.
Restaurants have the same failure rate as all other small businesses, they are more visible since they have a building, and you likely heard about them. For example, did you know about the lawn mowing company didn't make it?
 
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Kinda off topic, but back in the 1980's I bought an Essex 1911 frame, and a "kit" that came with every part needed to assemble a 1911 style .45 pistol. I figured how tough could it be to put all the parts together, and the total cost for frame and parts was only $209.
When the parts kit arrived I was excited until I looked at the barrel! It was just partially milled for the locking lugs, and the instruction book described how to file to fit the lugs to the slide for a "perfect lockup"!
I soon began assembling the kit, and realized a huge number of the parts needed work with stoning, or jeweler's files to make it all fit. And a tube of valve lapping compound just to get the slide to frame rails lapped into perfect clearance.
After several weeks of evenings at the bench, it finally came together and I headed to the range. To my surprise it not only functioned flawlessly, but shot very tight groups! But it took so much time and elbow grease to carefully fit it that I swore I'd never do it again.
A few years later a local gunsmith I knew offered gunsmithing classes through Portland Community College, and I took his classes. Can't even imagine PCC ever offering such a thing these days! It was well attended, but after basic gunsmithing PCC cancelled plans for an advanced class, and the gunsmith held those at his shop at night instead.
I had a good handle on parts replacement, but his classes really helped advance my skills from a parts replacer to being able to make more advanced repairs. Wish some gunsmith would offer classes locally again, as I think they'd be an asset to a lot of gun owners, regardless if they wanted a career in guns, or just a better understanding of repairs.
 

Juniper9mm

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Noveske is in Grant's Pass. About an hour each way to Roseburg, but if it's for something you love and want to get into manufacturing...
 
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Kinda off topic, but back in the 1980's I bought an Essex 1911 frame, and a "kit" that came with every part needed to assemble a 1911 style .45 pistol. I figured how tough could it be to put all the parts together, and the total cost for frame and parts was only $209.
When the parts kit arrived I was excited until I looked at the barrel! It was just partially milled for the locking lugs, and the instruction book described how to file to fit the lugs to the slide for a "perfect lockup"!
I soon began assembling the kit, and realized a huge number of the parts needed work with stoning, or jeweler's files to make it all fit. And a tube of valve lapping compound just to get the slide to frame rails lapped into perfect clearance.
After several weeks of evenings at the bench, it finally came together and I headed to the range. To my surprise it not only functioned flawlessly, but shot very tight groups! But it took so much time and elbow grease to carefully fit it that I swore I'd never do it again.
A few years later a local gunsmith I knew offered gunsmithing classes through Portland Community College, and I took his classes. Can't even imagine PCC ever offering such a thing these days! It was well attended, but after basic gunsmithing PCC cancelled plans for an advanced class, and the gunsmith held those at his shop at night instead.
I had a good handle on parts replacement, but his classes really helped advance my skills from a parts replacer to being able to make more advanced repairs. Wish some gunsmith would offer classes locally again, as I think they'd be an asset to a lot of gun owners, regardless if they wanted a career in guns, or just a better understanding of repairs.
My first build was a 1911. It went together so perfectly with zero issues. I cut the slides and barrel seat by hand and to this day it is the smoothest and most reliable firearm I own. Its what got me to peruse this trade
 

GrayGoose

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Hello,
I am all about firearms and wanted a career change from a 13 year run at bartending.
I spend most of my days researching guns, parts, how they work, and the history behind them.
Currently living in Roseburg gives me a few options for applying to work for a licensed FFL.
Eventually I would like to have my own business and FFL7 to manufacture and build my own creations to sell.
Just having a hard time finding an entry point to get my foot in the door as most folks around here are already fully staffed.
Please if you have any advice or words of wisdom to help me along the way in this journey it would be greatly appreciated .

Thank you 2A family and have a wonderful holiday season!

H.G.
Alexandria Occasional Cotex was a bartender too. I wonder why she didn't go into gunsmithing? o_O:oops:
 
You may want to look at places like Sonoran Desert Institute that teaches gunsmith courses and may also help with job location. It's a niche trade I think, similar to watchmaking which is what I did first when I got out of the service, but you often need to move to the jobs in those niche trades.
I worked in a LGS for a bit while in school, but sales wasn't my thing as I'm more introverted and don't enjoy that type of social interaction much.
Machine and micro mechanics coursework I think will help in the long run if you're determined to go this route.
 
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"Alexandria Occasional Cotex was a bartender too. I wonder why she didn't go into gunsmithing?"

Because she isn't smart enough to field strip a 1911 let alone do a trigger job.
 

Knobgoblin

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"Alexandria Occasional Cotex was a bartender too. I wonder why she didn't go into gunsmithing?"

Because she isn't smart enough to field strip a 1911 let alone do a trigger job.

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