Second opions on repairing Beretta 92F barrel.

Discussion in 'Maintenance & Gunsmithing' started by gambolputty, Jul 22, 2012.

  1. gambolputty

    gambolputty
    Oregon
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    I have a 92F that was stolen and recovered. The gun was left out in the rain and the barrel has some minor pitting and abrasions to the blued finish. I asked my local gunsmith (and Beretta service shop) about obtaining a replacement barrel. He suggested that I simply get the barrel stripped and polished. I kind of like the idea, but wonder about corrosion problems going forward.

    Has any one here done something similar to one of their guns? How did it work out long term?

    Also, should I be able to get a replacement barrel from Beretta or is it likely my gun is too old. It is an original Italian import 92F purchased just before the ban.

    thanks a bunch
     
  2. assault15

    assault15
    Corvallis
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    I have a new in bag beretta m9 barrel that I would part with for $80 if you decide to replace it.
     
  3. jonn5335

    jonn5335
    Longview
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    You can order a new barrel for $100 or so. I would'nt want my barrel to be in the white (unfinished) a gunsmith should'nt charge too much just to reblue/park the barrel
     
  4. jbett98

    jbett98
    NW Oregon
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    I have had very good results with a product called "Laurel Mountain Forge" when bluing gun parts. Very simple to use, just a lot of elbow grease involved.
    Costs about $15.00 shipped to your door, and I've done two pistols and one rifle so far.
     
  5. Sheldon

    Sheldon
    California
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    Last time I looked on the "equipment exchange" area of the AR15.com site there was a guy selling some take-off barrels with the locking block for $65. I believe these have the phosphate finish though. Might still be some left.
     
  6. gambolputty

    gambolputty
    Oregon
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    Thanks a bunch guys. Good info!!
     
  7. deadshot2

    deadshot2
    NW Quadrant WA State
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    Don't overlook the results one can get, especially on small parts, with the "DIY" bluing materials.

    I've re-blued a barrel for an old S&W by simply polishing, then putting in a pot of boiling water. Remove, dry with a lint free closth (a well laundered t-shirt usually fits the bill) and while the barrel is still hot, apply bluing agent. Even the cheap Birchwood Casey "Gel" will do a respectable job if there is no grease or contaminants on the surface. After the first coat, polish with the finest steel wool you can find. Burnish with a rag just like you would shine your shoes. Repeat process until you have the finish you desire. This process would be a pain in the south end for anything much larger than a pistol barrel but a good project, non the less.
     
    Nightshade and (deleted member) like this.
  8. Blitzkrieg

    Blitzkrieg
    WA
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    Use naval jelly and then Birchwood Casey Superblue.. and just shoot it.. if you want a new barrel there are stanless aftermarket barrels for cheep as mentioned already
     
  9. jbett98

    jbett98
    NW Oregon
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    Be careful when using steel wool between applications of bluing. Steel wool is coated with oil to prevent rust.
    I degrease them with lacquer thinner before using.
     

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