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Seating and crimping

Discussion in 'Ammunition & Reloading' started by IheartGUNS, Mar 20, 2012.

  1. IheartGUNS

    IheartGUNS WaCo Well-Known Member

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    I'm reading a reloading handbook and it says try not to seat and crimp bullet with the same die if possible. Why not?? Is it better to seat bullet and crimp separately?
     
  2. Blitzkrieg

    Blitzkrieg WA Well-Known Member

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    You should look into taper crimp dies, it's a separate die that saves a lot of trouble and locks bullets in tight without over working the brass
     
  3. Nwcid

    Nwcid Yakima and N of Spokane Well-Known Member

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    Because you are trying to push a bullet into the mouth while smashing the mouth closed at the same time.

    In separate steps you you get the bullet to the proper depth, then you crimp it in.
     
  4. IheartGUNS

    IheartGUNS WaCo Well-Known Member

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    Damn I bought a crap load of reloading stuff. Looks like I need to switch out some things. Its a good thing I didn't buy all the dies I am going to reload...
     
  5. nrc

    nrc Oregon Member

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    Don't throw anything away. If you really feel like seating crimping in 2 steps, then just buy a dedicated crimp die for each caliber.

    fwiw - its easier to get it right by doing it in two steps, but its not really that difficult either way. Which caliber or calibers are you starting with?
     
  6. Blitzkrieg

    Blitzkrieg WA Well-Known Member

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    And you can always later sell what you did not need here on the forum. I am currently buying some reloading dies and such for new calibers I am interested in
     
  7. IheartGUNS

    IheartGUNS WaCo Well-Known Member

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    Well I'm starting of with 9mm and 45acp for now. I just want to do it right and cheap the first time. Cheap meaning buying dies only once. The dies set I have now are carbide dies with the tc and seating in one die.
     
  8. motoman98

    motoman98 Gresham, OR Active Member

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    You taper crimp both .45acp and 9mm rounds. Check your die instructions, they are set up for that. You crimp revolver loads (and also rifle loads in autoloaders).
     
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  9. Throckmorton

    Throckmorton Florence,Ore ah gone Well-Known Member

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    another good reason is,the depth and the crimp are easer to fine-adjust with 2 dies.with a seat,crimp die,if u change the crimp,the depth is also changed and must be readjusted.
     
  10. Nwcid

    Nwcid Yakima and N of Spokane Well-Known Member

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    Sorry I was assuming you were talking rifle rounds.

    With pistols not so much of an issue.
     
  11. Abiqua

    Abiqua Oregon Active Member

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    You should be able to adjust your current crimp/seating die to only seat and then use a separate crimp die. I like the Lee Factory Crimp Die, it does a great job and is inexpensive.
     
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  12. wakejoe

    wakejoe Beaverton, OR Well-Known Member

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    Dunno what brand you are using, but I'm sure it's similar in function.

    die-collage.jpg

    The Hornady crimp/seat die does not crimp until the bullet is fully seated to your set length.
     
  13. Mikej

    Mikej Portland Gold Supporter Gold Supporter 2015 Volunteer 2016 Volunteer

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    I've been using the seating/taper crimp die with no probs what so ever. Do you have the instructions that came with the dies? They will explain the "Fine tuning" process, after that it becomes a matter of "Feel". You basically adjust to feel when the crimping(should be called squeezing) is taking place, and then adjust the seating to where you want it.

    Mike
     
  14. Blitzkrieg

    Blitzkrieg WA Well-Known Member

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    I taper crimp all my hand loads as well as factory self defense auto pistol rounds.. as do many police depts these days.. it prevents bullet setback under repeated chambering of duty rounds. Police depts such as Tacoma, WA use jail trustees to do this work

    Just gradually adjust the taper die until it gives a gentle but good taper to the case. Another benefit is it improves feeding of the rounds because they have a smoother profile
     
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  15. nrc

    nrc Oregon Member

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    You're ok with the sets you have.

    I have separate crimp dies for certain calibers - but not for those two. Taper crimp / seat in the same step is fine. There should be a section in the beginning of your reloading manual (or manual's' plural) that will walk you through the process.
     
  16. XSubSailor

    XSubSailor SW WA Active Member

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    Seat/crimp in the same die is fine w/plated/jacketed bullets, but can cause lead shaving when loading cast lead bullets. If loading lead, it's best to use separate seating and crimp dies.
     
  17. deadshot2

    deadshot2 NW Quadrant WA State Well-Known Member

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    If working on a tight budget one can use the same die for seating and crimping. It is best to do it in separate steps though for the stated reasons. Just seat all your bullets with the die body backed off a turn, with the seater adjusted down for the correct length. To crimp in a separate operation just back off the seater plug and adjust the die down for the desired crimp.

    Of course one could just invest in a Lee Factory Crimp Die. Not expensive and it provides the correct crimp for the caliber.
     
  18. iusmc2002

    iusmc2002 Colville, WA Active Member

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    +10 on the Lee FCD because you can crimp bullets that don't have cannelures on them. But deadshot2 is right about making it seperate steps if you want, just do one operation for all the rounds you're going to load and then reset the die to crimp after you've backed the bullet seating stem out. I have a set of Lee's RGB dies in 308 that I reload my dad's AR-10 rounds with, and they are a seating/crimping die. It isn't hard at all to adjust your dies for seating and crimping in one shot. Just remember to trim your brass to the same length so all the rounds get the same crimp! If you roll crimp with different length brass, you're going to have some f'd up crimps
     
  19. IheartGUNS

    IheartGUNS WaCo Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for all the info guys really appreciate it. I've been trying to stay away from lee dies, because people say its to short? But it seems like everyone is recommending lee dies, and I guess for what they cost ill give lees a shot.
     
  20. deadshot2

    deadshot2 NW Quadrant WA State Well-Known Member

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    People tend to "say a lot" about Lee Dies. Unfortunately they are usually commenting because they think they're cheap. Lee's dies are as good as any other for general loading. They're not much on polish but they make good ammo. I have Lee dies that have been loading 9mm and .223 since the late 70's and you can't tell the difference in the finished round when compared with any made with my RCBS or Redding Dies.

    I will say one thing about Lee Sizing dies. It's harder to get "lube dents" with them as they have a relief hole in the side of the die body that prevents the buildup at the shoulder of any lube. Ditto for Forster. Redding, which some consider the "Gold Standard" doesn't and it's real easy to put these dents in the shoulders.

    Since this thread was on seating and crimping, Lee dies work just great for both and the Factory Crimp die shines.