Salt storage

darkminstrel

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Been splitting up our back-stock of food into smaller lots for ease of transport/cycling it out for newer and I've run into a roadblock.

Salt in mylar bags...

As a corrosive I'm concerned that it may eat away the bag and leech some of its metals into the salt. Does anyone have direct experience with storage of their salt in mylar and any noticeable effects there-in?
 
I wouldn't bother with mylar, just a good food quality bucket with a sealing lid. I wouldn't even bother with dessicant for salt. If it gets damp, it will dissolve and re-solidify, but it can't be harmed by that, you just have to break it up again. It won't spoil. Save the mylar bags for something that needs it. Salt's nt really corrosive without water anyway. When it's dry it's fairly inert. It needs the water to really conduct an ionic exchange with other metals.
 
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I just put a bunch of "specialty" salt (kosher, pickling, sea salt, etc) into glass canning jars. We go through so little that it makes more sense to do it this way. Might get some bigger gallon sized jars for the regular table salt that I have, but not sure I want to go to the trouble.
 
Salt is very important for primitive cultures because they often didn't get enough in their diet, particularly of the iodine and trace minerals that are included in sea salt, and it was also important as a preservative.

When people store large bags of rock salt, they are usually looking at it for this latter purpose. Especially for tanning hides. You can also use it to make ice cream from snow- the ice lowers the freezing point enough to keep it softer.
 
Remember folks that salt is relatively cheap now a days and it could save your bacon in a major event...quite literally...so I'd store as much as you have room for. For instance you might not have a good amount of fuel to use for canning home grown or foraged items...salt can help you preserve the harvest as well as meats. My grandmothers use to salt greenbeans in crocks and those greenbeans were saved for Thanksgiving and Xmas. She would put coarse salt into bottom, layer in organized fashion the greenbeans, then add some more salt and repeat till close to the top then pack it down well put a plate on top and cover it with salt then the crock cover of some sort.

Eastern cultures use salt to not only pickle greens of all sorts they use it to salt then air dry those same greens in times with no refrigeration by hanging the whole cabbages on lines on in baskets. Of course you can always salt your fish and meats as well as fruits to help with the drying process.

I might add here that my grandmother (part Cherokee) used salt and lard to preserve cooked meats in crocks. The salt as a preservative and the lard to form an air tight seal. She routinely fried up chickens and turkeys she salt cured, fried and then packed into crocks, then poured hot lard over it till it was sealed then she stored in cellar. Good thing to know how to do if you have meat, no refrigeration, and no time, fuel or canner (which take at minimal 1 1/2 hours of fuel time to process) to keep your slaughtered animal from spoiling. She used a lot of salt to make "dry sausage" out of meats that she stuffed into muslin bags then huge outside on the porch. It was quite salty to eat by itself...but made great sausage patties for a biscuit or seasoning.
 
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darkminstrel

darkminstrel

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I'm stocking the salt as a preservative, medicinal, and spice. When I tan I prefer the brain/urine method since you can't safely consume the brain of the game who has thoughtfully provided the hide.

Currently we have ours stored in the sealed paper bags inside food-grade buckets that are sealed with a line of caulk. Up to about 250# so far. Looking to put back 4-500 total pounds. I got the idea to break our stores down into a grab-and-go food bucket style in case of house fire or flood or other such disaster. I'd rather have a mixed variety instead of having to subsist on 5gal. of black beans for a month straight. With the variety self contained with salt and sugar included I could more readily concoct meals that aren't monotonous.

Morale is also a consideration...although watching the kids launch themselves into the sky from the pure gaseous fuel they ignite by sitting by the fireside might boost *my* morale a bit.
 
I wouldn't devote a lot of space for Salt Storage when it's so readily available from our nearby waterway (Puget Sound).

Just enough for immediate use and the rest will come from boiled down saltwater from the Sound.
I still say store the salt and don't expect you can preserve foods with boiled down saltwater...LOL! Salt is cheap now days...but it could be worth it's weight in gold if there was a major hit to our transportation systems.

I figure if they ship huge amounts of Cargil Salt to Alaska for processing meats and fish...it must be because it is cheaper to do than evaporating salt water in Alaska. Just sayin! I don't know about the sun situation for your location...but I suspect in my location it would take a long while to get enough salt to do more than season my food with. That said...I certainly wouldn't use Puget Sound salt water to curdle my cheese or tofu if I had another source due to impurities.

Wonder how much salt a person would get say evaporating 50 gals of puget sound?
 
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and this:
SOLAR SALT: This is also sometimes confusingly called "sea salt". It is not, however, the same thing as the sea salt found in food stores. Most importantly, it is not food grade. It's main purpose is for use in water softeners. The reason it is called "solar" and sometimes "sea salt" is that it is produced by evaporation of sea water in large ponds in various arid areas of the world. This salt type is not purified and still contains the desiccated remains of whatever aquatic life might have been trapped in it. Those organic remains might react with the proteins in the foods you are attempting to preserve and cause it to spoil.
from: https://www.usaemergencysupply.com/information_center/food_storage_faq/salt.htm
 
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There's a multitude of pathogens, fungi, and bacterial spores that are completely unscathed by boiling or evaporation, and the remaining salt would be rife with them. No thanks.
 

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