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Safety offer for Ruger Single-Six(Old model)

Discussion in 'Handgun Discussion' started by DALE, Oct 4, 2009.

  1. DALE

    DALE Boring, Oregon Member

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  2. sheepman

    sheepman Las Vegas NV Member

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    It would probably be a good idea to send it in and have it converted. Some do not like the trigger of a converted model but Ruger does send the old parts back with the gun so it can be converted back. Actually the old model single action is safe if you use proper handling practice and load only 5 rounds and let the hammer down on a empty chamber. This was an excepted practice for over one hundred years by people who carried single actions. Load one skip one and load 4 letting the hammer down on the empty chamber. After shooting the new models a lot I actually prefer them but still only carry 5 rounds in the gun. Shoot safe : Bill :)
     
  3. 2gr8dgs

    2gr8dgs oregon Active Member

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    this is my OPINION only, but, there is no reason to send in your old model ruger to make it idiot proof for someone who couldn't be bothered to learn the most basic of firearms instruction. the gun-- unmodified --helps cleanse the gene pool of Darwin award winners. on a side note, no collecter that i know of is interested in "factory converted" old models.
     
  4. TINCANBANDIT

    TINCANBANDIT Federal Way Active Member

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    My Father sent his in, Ruger installed all new guts (trigger, hammer, sear, spring, etc) and sent us the old parts back with the gun. You can always return your gun to original if you desired.
     
  5. Shootshellz

    Shootshellz Edmonds Member

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    Good advice above; load one, skip one, load four, hammer down on an empty chamber. 'Safety' on any handgun is between your ears, not due to any mechanical features (or lack of same). Hopefully you won't get into any gunfights with your .22 so capacity is not an issue. My 'old model' Single Six won't be going back to the factory. Why fix what ain't broke?
     
  6. orygun

    orygun West Linn Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

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    I agree, and as someone else mentioned, so does anyone who's a Ruger collector. But as another mentioned, Ruger understands that and does send the old parts back with the converted gun. Also, the ONLY safe way to carry this gun is with the hammer down on an empty chamber. If you carry it any other way, you're tempting fate.
    My .41 Blackhawk will never be converted.

    Ruger started with the New Models in 1973 I believe. Since you purchased in the early 70s you may or may not have an early model. Early models have three screw heads visible on the right side of the frame. New Models have just two pins.
     
  7. The Quiet Man

    The Quiet Man rural Washington County, Oregon Active Member

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    My Super Single Six will never be converted while I own it either. Sell yours to someone who appreciates it and buy a "new-style" if you think the 3 screw is dangerous. Just my opinion.
     
  8. DALE

    DALE Boring, Oregon Member

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    Thanks gang for all the input. Here's a quote I found on Ruger's website that sums up why they are concerned, I highlighted the parts that I and many of you have also expressed concerns about:

    In the last few years, people are apparently becoming more willing to handle firearms, including Ruger single-action revolvers, without first receiving proper instruction from a knowledgeable shooter. No one should handle any gun without first having supervised instruction about the particular type of gun he is using, as well as about gun safety in general. Until very recently, everyone, gun users and nonusers alike, seemed to be well aware of this obvious rule, and accidents with single-action revolvers, as well as with other types of guns, were limited to those very few occasional lapses of common sense against which, unfortunately, there appears to be no real protection. Now, with the growth of consumerism, people who should know better are acting as though guns, like electric toasters, are meant to be foolproof. There is no such thing as a foolproof gun.
    Old Style Single-Action Revolvers
    HANDLE WITH CARE:
    STURM, RUGER & Company, Inc.

    I am comfortable in trusting to my ability to handle firearms safely, but aside from that I think I will send the revolver in for the mod. The idea of having six rounds chambered vs five is very appealing!