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S&W model 63 issues.

Discussion in 'Handgun Discussion' started by Hybrid Slave, Aug 21, 2015.

  1. Hybrid Slave

    Hybrid Slave Medford Member

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    I recently got a good deal on this revolver. It appeared to be in good condition. Trigger was a bit heavy (normal for rimfires, I'm told) , but relatively smooth. Lock up was very tight.

    Took it out to the range with my boy and nephew and enjoyed about 100, maybe 200 rounds before the double action pull started to bind. Ejecting empty cases also became very difficult at this point as well.

    Later, at home, I put some oil on the cylinder face where it was collecting the most powder and where I suspected the tension to be taking place. The trigger loosened up a bit but not quite like it was when clean.

    This is the first rimfire revolver that I've owned, so my question(s);
    1) Is this happening because the .22 LR is just plain dirty to begin with, and therefore I may just need to clean the gun out every hundred or so rounds?
    2) Is there something else wrong with the gun?
    3) Has anyone experienced a similar problem, and with which 22LR revolvers?
     
  2. Certaindeaf

    Certaindeaf SE Portland Well-Known Member

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    Clean it very well with a gun cleaning solvent such as Hoppes (follow the directions).. especially the cylinders, cylinder face etc., forcing cone and under the star.
    Make sure that under the star is dry of all solvents or oils after cleaning and make sure to eject the empties with the muzzle pointed up to minimize unburnt powder from getting trapped between the star and cylinder.
    Yes, .22's can be pretty filthy.. just look at and feel the gun. If that gun gets too ganked and you horse the trigger, you'll screw up the timing pronto.
    And .22's have heavier DA trigger pulls than centerfires.. just the way things are.
    Good luck.
     
    ma96782 and Sgt Nambu like this.
  3. jbett98

    jbett98 NW Oregon Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

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    On the right side of the gun, you will find a screw located above the trigger.
    It's the cylinder stop screw and if you carefully remove it, it allows you to take the cylinder crane off the gun for a more thorough cleaning.
     
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  4. Certaindeaf

    Certaindeaf SE Portland Well-Known Member

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    And I'd venture that "100, maybe 200 rounds before the double action pull started to bind" is about average/very common for .22 revolvers. Some do it with just a few cylinder fulls but those need to be fixed.. unless it's just unburned powder under the star..
    If you want to plink more per outing, bring a simple cleaning kit and do a quick clean.. probably take thirty seconds.
     
  5. ma96782

    ma96782 Vancouver, WA Well-Known Member

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    Besides a good cleaning routine.

    You may want to also consider that 22LR has that waxy lube on the outside of the bullet. So sometimes, the build up of that lube prevents the cartridge from fully going all the way into the cylinder. Maybe, the back end of the case is dragging a bit on the frame?

    Or, as mentioned earlier, a powder flake could be lodged under the extractor star?

    Of course, the build up of burnt powder could also decrease the gap between the face of the cylinder and the barrel, causing it to drag. That could be "taken cared of" by opening the gap a tiny bit at a time. But, if you open up the gap too much.......you could cause "spitting." And, you'll need to keep the face of the barrel perpendicular to the bore axis. A couple of strokes with a file to the barrel. Cough, cough.....a job, not for the faint of heart. Of course, the gunsmith has "proper tools" for the job.

    Or, you could polish the cylinder's end. There is a way of doing that too.

    But maybe, all things considered, just cleaning your revolver would be a better idea.

    Aloha, Mark
     
    Last edited: Aug 21, 2015
    Hybrid Slave likes this.
  6. Hybrid Slave

    Hybrid Slave Medford Member

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    This makes sense. I did clean the gun thoroughly before hand, and it worked well. But the fifth and sixth rounds were still tight to chamber.

    Also, Upon closer inspection of the cylinder gap, it appeared to me that the barrel was not exactly perpendicular to the cylinder as there appeared to be a wider gap at the top part than at the bottom of the barrel.

    I suspect that someone may have already performed the operation you suggested, and didn't do a very skillful job.

    I could be mistaken though because the lower part of the (breech?) face actually rubs the cylinder face, but comes off to a proper gap space, while the top part widens maybe a bit too much (I'm not knowledgeable of such things), when I push the cylinder backwards. However, it still returns to contact because of the latch spring.

    I'm lazy about cleaning. One of the reasons that I always try to buy stainless. Once I do so, I'm hopeful that the gun will be good to go again because I'd rather not have to take it to a smith to file down the breech face (is that what it is called on revolvers?).

    Thanks for the info.
     
  7. Hybrid Slave

    Hybrid Slave Medford Member

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    Thank you everyone. Guess I'm just lazy when it comes to cleaning.
    Military service kinda killed the fun of that for me, so I got out of the habit of gun scrubbing just for the sake of doing it. My life no longer depends upon it... not so much anyway.
     
  8. jbett98

    jbett98 NW Oregon Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

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    The swing crane might be bent out of perpendicular to the forcing cone.
    I have seen that happen with revolvers when people drop the gun when open or, they repeatedly do the cowboy flip with their wrist, instead of closing it with their left hand.
     
  9. Certaindeaf

    Certaindeaf SE Portland Well-Known Member

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    It seems the ammo is a tight fit with clean chambers? What kind of ammo?
    Don't tell me it's that baggy packed "Europlink" .22 ammo that says it probably won't fit in many guns.
     
  10. Hybrid Slave

    Hybrid Slave Medford Member

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    Winchester Xpert HV, 36 Gr. bulk ammo.
     
  11. Hybrid Slave

    Hybrid Slave Medford Member

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    Quite possibly, yes. I don't trust my own skill or knowledge in this area so I guess I may have to take it to the local smith, Boening's Custom Guns in Medford.

    I understand that he does excellent work on 1911's. Don't know about revolvers though.
     
  12. jbett98

    jbett98 NW Oregon Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

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    The last thing I would do is file anything on it.
    If you think about it, the frame and barrel are fitted together and the cylinder/yoke assembly are the moving parts that should swing into the correct position when latched into the frame.
    There are bushings in the cylinder that might be the culprit, or the extractor might be bent.

    Try looking up your model 63 on Numrich's Gun Parts website. They have a schematic showing the parts I'm talking about.

    You might also want to contact S&W about having them take a look at it, and you might get them to repair it for less then a local gunsmith would charge.
     
  13. ma96782

    ma96782 Vancouver, WA Well-Known Member

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    A gunsmith usually has special tools available to him (other than just a file) to square up the back of your barrel. One particular tool is available through Brownells. But, it's expensive and takes a bit of finess. On the good side, it can also do forcing cones.

    I've found that shipping handguns, can be expensive and frustrating (unless the mfn pays). Sometimes, the local guy is just easier to deal with and you could actually save money vs. shipping it back yourself. A lifetime warantee don't mean much to me, when you're paying $80 just to ship it back.

    Aloha, Mark
     
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  14. Hybrid Slave

    Hybrid Slave Medford Member

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    Gave the little .22 "J" another thorough cleaning and it's turning fine like before. Will look into some of the procedures suggested here though, like polishing the cylinder face- things I can do myself.

    When I can spare the cash, I'll talk to Boening's and see what else I can do to get more rounds out of the gun between cleanings. I really like the feel of this little gun and I didn't want to trade it.

    My rimfire revolver experience is limited to this one and a Ruger Single Six that a friend of mine had that used to shoot and shoot and shoot. Even my old MkII would pop more than 200 rounds without a hitch.

    What can I say, it's a Smith& Wesson, so I'll give it the benefit of the doubt. Now to tweak with my newer MkII (but that is another story).

    Thanks, everyone for the info.