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S&W 40 Brass

Discussion in 'Ammunition & Reloading' started by flybye43, Nov 6, 2011.

  1. flybye43

    flybye43 Oregon New Member

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    I shoot up a lot of 40 cal ammo is it worth saving the brass to give to a re loader. Or is it not worth the savings? I no absalutly nothing about reloading :confused:
     
  2. gunfreak

    gunfreak Boise Well-Known Member

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    I'll take the .40 brass. Where do you live.
     
  3. bruzer

    bruzer Grants Pass, OR Well-Known Member

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    Save the brass or at least let me know where I can pick it up at. Thanks,
    Mike
     
  4. darkminstrel

    darkminstrel PDX Well-Known Member

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    I'm third in line!

    And I bet that answers your questions, eh? ****, I'll even pay you.
     
  5. FarmerTed1971

    FarmerTed1971 Portland, Oregon, United States Well-Known Member

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    If you shoot a lot, reload. You will enjoy the savings and can tailor your loads to suit the purpose. Reloading pistol cartridges is not difficult. Give it a try.
     
  6. flybye43

    flybye43 Oregon New Member

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    Is it spendy to get started from scratch
     
  7. darkminstrel

    darkminstrel PDX Well-Known Member

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    $300 OTD for me. I already had the brass. Gets you a press and a die set of your choice. Add in $20 for powder and whatever you want to spend in projectiles. Not that bad. I've had my press for only a year now and I've loaded 5000 rounds in that time for about half of what I would have paid retail. That's why your brass is sought after.
     
  8. gunfreak

    gunfreak Boise Well-Known Member

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    Ordered a Lee from Cabelas, loaded thousands of various rounds and only cost about $100.
     
  9. flybye43

    flybye43 Oregon New Member

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    Thank you every body ............ reload it is, that only means twice as much shooting :)
     
  10. SmellsFishy

    SmellsFishy Hood River, OR Member

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    This is a perfect post to hijack. I'm also shooting alot of .40 S&W and am wondering if it makes sense to get into reloading. I dont have alot ot of spare time to spend in the reloading process....

    And I'm a businessman... so whats the cost-benefit-analysis say about reloading? i.e., how long will it take to reload..say, 500rds of .40 and how much will it cost?

    Thanks!
     
  11. darkminstrel

    darkminstrel PDX Well-Known Member

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    The initial cost to purchase a single stage press plus all of the components and tools will push the cost per round to .50-.80 cents depending on your end total. After the first 1-2k rounds your cost per drops by half, or more, of retail. This is from my experience and cost analysis of my particular set up. I've put in about $550US into gear and components and I only load 3 calibres. In 200 more rounds I'll have reached the tipping point and will start seeing the benefit in cost as well as the heightened accuracy tuning rounds for my particular weapons brings.

    Edit; After moderate practice I can load 500 rounds in 2 hours. This accounts for case prep, dropping powder, and seating bullets and I'm in no way a pro.
     
  12. sneakboxer

    sneakboxer NW OR Active Member

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    Reloading is a great hobby in its self. You won't save any money because you will shoot twice as much! You will also have the ability to make what you want and match the load to your gun. Get yourself a reloading manual and read it before you get your gear.
    Youtube has a few videos on the process if you have never seen it.
     
  13. SmellsFishy

    SmellsFishy Hood River, OR Member

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    Great info guys! 500rds in 2-hours gives me a good idea of the time part of the equation. And only 2k rds to see a significant savings over retail...Thats not bad at all...

    I'll keep reading up on it.

    Thanks!
     
  14. Kevatc

    Kevatc Oregon Well-Known Member

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    With pistol ammo look into a turret press or a progressive press. You'll be able to crank out ammo like crazy. It will take awhile to recoup your initial capital outlay. However, there is something empowering in having all the necessary stuff on hand to "roll your own".
     
  15. deadshot2

    deadshot2 NW Quadrant WA State Well-Known Member

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    As you stated, you're a businessman. As such you wouldn't be trying to recoup the initial cost on the first few boxes of ammo but over a several year period of time. If you added up the savings over let's say 5 years, you'll see that the amount can be real eye-opening. With that in mind, don't "think cheap" when getting started. Perhaps buy a single stage which is almost an essential for any beginner and as a "load development tool" for an old timer. Once you have mastered the art of making one round at a time then invest in a setup that will serve your needs trouble free for the duration of your hobby. Make an investment in some equipment that can hold up and produce the quantity/quality of ammo that you will be needing for the peak of your needs, not just when you are starting out. Also, I reload so I can shoot more often and for less money, not so I have something to "tinker" with.

    Reloading for pistol allows one to shoot far more for the same amount of money as buying new. More "trigger" time is bound to make one more proficient and if carrying for Self Defense, more effective should that time come.