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We moved from NM to TN. In NM you could watch a rock dry up and crumble. Pretty much zero humidity. In the almost three years it took to get the house built here, the gun collection stayed in a safe. Now looking at some of the guns I see rust marks. They are the sort that want to make you cry. The 8" .357 Python just pains me to look at the rust on the front site and barrel. The finish they put on these seems beyond the bluing on other barrels? So, what would be your advice? Other than don't ever, ever, ever store guns without a dehumidifier. Another barrel has a different story. It's been in a fire. This seems like the old bluing should be removed. It's an old 30-30 and after the fire will be a wall hanger. And how about some techniques on how to make small parts look good. Like screw heads. Thx.
 
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When my dad died i found his old 30-30 and .45 that I forgot about. Both went through the house fire that burned out entire house down except the cinder block basement. Both got doused with water went the put fire out.

Fast forward 30 years and when dad died i found them both. both solid rust and the .45 has rounds in it. I could not move slide not cycle the 303-30. i took both guns to Oregon Timberwolf to make then presentable for wall hangers. 6 months later I got them back. He cerakoted them both, replaced any bad parts, cleaned up the wood and stuck in the test fire range. They both shot great. While they are more sentimental to me I will hunt a deer with the 30-30 for ol pops one day. Some of the rust pits could not come out but overall they turned out great. the .45.the brought back from the war.

IMG_0930.jpg IMG_0888.jpg
 

RVTECH

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And how about some techniques on how to make small parts look good. Like screw heads.
Small parts (such as screws) can be 'oil blackened' which really comes out nice.

Basically you sand or stone the part to smooth it out and remove the original finish (such as on screw heads), pour a small amount of USED motor oil into a small jar and set aside on your bench.

Set the screw or small part on a steel surface and heat with a LP torch until red hot and pick up the part (with pliers!) and drop into the motor oil. Dig it out after a couple minutes, rinse the oil off and you will be impressed!

I have done this many times with screws that were beat up due to someone using the wrong screwdriver or bit and really stood out on a nicely blued receiver and this procedure makes them look new again!
 
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Small parts (such as screws) can be 'oil blackened' which really comes out nice.

Basically you sand or stone the part to smooth it out and remove the original finish (such as on screw heads), pour a small amount of USED motor oil into a small jar and set aside on your bench.

Set the screw or small part on a steel surface and heat with a LP torch until red hot and pick up the part (with pliers!) and drop into the motor oil. Dig it out after a couple minutes, rinse the oil off and you will be impressed!

I have done this many times with screws that were beat up due to someone using the wrong screwdriver or bit and really stood out on a nicely blued receiver and this procedure makes them look new again!
Hey thanks! Great idea. BTW, in the Gulf wars when the oil fields were lit, they would take marble slabs, like for kitchens and bath counter tops, and slip them into the oil to darken and enrich the color.
 
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If it is just surface rust, I take the finest steel wool [0000] and soak it well with light oil [ WD 40 or mineral oil work for this] and buff off the rust. Steel wool should not harm blueing but will remove the red rust. If the rust is deeper than the finish it will still show some freckling but not the rust. At that point if I need some color I'll ad some cold blue and oil well.
If its past that point reblueing is in order. Good Luck, DR
 
If it is just surface rust, I take the finest steel wool [0000] and soak it well with light oil [ WD 40 or mineral oil work for this] and buff off the rust. Steel wool should not harm blueing but will remove the red rust. If the rust is deeper than the finish it will still show some freckling but not the rust. At that point if I need some color I'll ad some cold blue and oil well.
If its past that point reblueing is in order. Good Luck, DR
Try and stick to a light oil if you do this, not WD40.
 
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And DO NOT WIREBRUSH IT!!!! if its rust, boil it in hot water, that turns the rust black and then lightly card it.

Or try rubbing some barricade on it and see if it will remove the rust!
 
Try and stick to a light oil if you do this, not WD40.
An old wino back in NC showed me a trick for removing surface rust on metal and chromed surfaces. Crumple up a good sized ball of Reynolds Wrap, run it under a faucet and then rub it like crazy on the rusted area. Danged if it doesn't work. It's that danged chemistry and covalent bonds and stuff. RIP Roy Summerlin, Jr and thank you for everything....
 

jjfitch

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I have restored a couple of firearms that were stored for many years without any attention. Both had surface rust that was visible as a reddish brown roughness.

I used cold blue applied with rough denim fabric rubbed until it was removed. It took several applications to remove the rust. It turned out amazing and doesn't look at all like cold blue.

Had this not worked I would have gone to the next "roughness" application of 0000 steel wool.

Smiles,
 
Last Edited:
An old wino back in NC showed me a trick for removing surface rust on metal and chromed surfaces. Crumple up a good sized ball of Reynolds Wrap, run it under a faucet and then rub it like crazy on the rusted area. Danged if it doesn't work. It's that danged chemistry and covalent bonds and stuff. RIP Roy Summerlin, Jr and thank you for everything....
Yeah, softer metal and a lubricant/method to move the removed material away from the area.

Copper, yes the pennies work great, and a very light oil is more effective that the example given, but it doesn't mean it doesn't work :)
 
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for light rust I've found a blob of Harbor Freight Goop orange hand cleaner to work very well. Just enough acidity to release the rust. But keep in mind there is lava bit in there so don't scrub with it unless you have heavy duty rust....
As for bluing I'd like to hear some input on the original post question...
 
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An old wino back in NC showed me a trick for removing surface rust on metal and chromed surfaces. Crumple up a good sized ball of Reynolds Wrap, run it under a faucet and then rub it like crazy on the rusted area. Danged if it doesn't work. It's that danged chemistry and covalent bonds and stuff. RIP Roy Summerlin, Jr and thank you for everything....
Do you think your idea would work on this? Thx

gun rust 1.jpg
 
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Oh yeah that will wipe off. Get some Barricade wipes and wipe it off. I personally would take that sight off before doing anything to it...
 
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