DeanMk

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In the early 1960's, my dad picked up a little Ruger Standard pistol with a 6" barrel (not a Mk.1, as the title indicates).
Although Dad passed on a while ago, we still have all of his guns, including the little pistol.
I never did like shooting it, because the weight was so neutral.
I never had anything to "push" against.
However, I was just reminded that Ruger makes a bull barrel option for that gun.
This may sound like a stupid question, but I know there's been a lot of changes to that pistol since the days of when my Dad's pistol was made.
Is it possible to still get parts (like a bull barrel) for a gun of that vintage?

Ruger_Mk1_Dads_2.jpg
 
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Parts are still available, check eBay. However, trying to find just a MKI bull barrel/receiver would be difficult. This would also need an FFL transfer as the receiver has a serial number. Keep your dad's pistol and just look to buy another MKI bull barreled pistol. Better yet, get a MKII. Always some on GunBroker.
 

DeanMk

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Parts are still available, check eBay. However, trying to find just a MKI bull barrel/receiver would be difficult. This would also need an FFL transfer as the receiver has a serial number. Keep your dad's pistol and just look to buy another MKI bull barreled pistol. Better yet, get a MKII. Always some on GunBroker.
That's not a bad idea. 🤔
 

Alexx1401

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In the early 1960's, my dad picked up a little Ruger Mk.1 pistol.
Although Dad passed on a while ago, we still have all of his guns, including the little pistol.
I never did like shooting it, because the weight was so neutral.
I never had anything to "push" against.
However, I was just reminded that Ruger makes a bull barrel option for that gun.
This may sound like a stupid question, but I know there's been a lot of changes to that pistol since the days of when my Dad's pistol was made.
Is it possible to still get parts (like a bull barrel) for a gun of that vintage?

View attachment 1201272
If you want a different MK, like one with a Bull Barrel you should check into selling or trading that one. A pistol that old draws collectors. Having the original box and it looks to be in good shape will increase what some collector will pay for it. You may well be able to sell that one for as much as a new MKIV runs or damn close.
 

PORSCHE928S4

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I have one from my dad and did not want to destroy it and have the option to return it to its original configuration. I wanted a threaded barrel and instead or ruining the original I ordered another upper from Tactical Solutions and it is a direct fit. The original upper just went into the safe and the new set up works great ! It now sounds like a staple gun crazy !
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po18guy

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Contact Ruger regarding the barrel. Yet, as mentioned, it is more valuable as is. I have an RST-4 which I purchased in 1973 that has also not been shot much. There is something vaguely off-putting about firing the gun. Light muzzle, lack of heft, spindly grip frame, trigger reach and overtravel - perhaps all of them. I have a High Standard which is much more pleasant to fire, but it cost 4X as much, so it should be.
 

DeanMk

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UPDATE: Just filled a hole in my education and had to make a correction.
It has always been my understanding that all Ruger pistols were "Mk.1" and then either "Target" or "Standard'.
However, I'm discovering that the Mk.1 IS the target version, with the adjustable sights.
As you can see (maybe not?) this gun has fixed sights.
Dad bought a Ruger Standard w/ 6" barrel, not a Mk.1.
I've corrected my opening post, but don't see any way to change the title.
Apologies if my error caused any confusion.
 

arTen

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Nice old Ruger Standard that appears to be in excellent condition! As a bonus it looks like the box is also in great condition, and the sales receipt for $28.75 is icing on the cake! If it were mine I would not modify it.

These were introduced in 1949 and the first firearm Sturm Ruger produced. Amazingly you can still buy this pistol configuration (with refinements) new from Ruger 73 years later! Check it out on Ruger's website https://ruger.com/products/markIVStandard/models.html MSRP is $539. They also sell many other configurations. Ruger has produced millions of these. The aftermarket supply of parts and upgrades is abundant. It's a timeless design that will continue to be around for a long time.

Your old one is not super valuable, but it is still worth a bit more than a new one. If you really need one with a bull barrel, then sell yours (for good money) and have money left over to buy a new one with a bull barrel. The current Mark IV version has some nice refinements compared to the originals.

I have a similar story. My dad purchased a new 1957 Ruger Standard 4 3/4" barrel in 1957. It was the first gun I ever shot back in the mid 60's. For decades I reminded him that when he goes I need to end up with it. He is 91 and still kickin'. I recently acquired it. My son is next on the list, with the stipulation that my grandson gets it next, and so on down the line. My grandson will eventually end up with a nice 100 year old Ruger Standard that was originally purchased by his great-grandfather!

This is one of my favorite firearms for sentimental reasons. We occasionally run a box of rounds through it. This pistol is still accurate, reliable, and fun to shoot!
 

DeanMk

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Great story arTen and very informative, too.
I found a serial # guide for those guns, in case anyone's interested.
Looks like Dad's gun was likely made towards the end of '62, so the March buy date on the receipt shows that the gun probably did not sit around long before he snatched it up.
I'm thinking you guys are on the right track about just getting another gun and leaving this one as is.
Not sure about selling it. There are siblings and relatives that may something to say about that, so I'll just have to wait and see.
Thanks everyone for your advice.
...dang, now I have to go gun shopping again.... ;)
 

Alexx1401

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My first pistol was a standard. I miss that gun
Me too. When I saw that pic it brought back GREAT memories. Bought one that was not anywhere near that nice looking as a kid. Must have put a box car load of ammo through it for many years. After I had some nicer ones it still got used now and then, some guy who just had to have it paid me enough to let it go but I miss the damn thing every time I see one now.
 

Alexx1401

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Great story arTen and very informative, too.
I found a serial # guide for those guns, in case anyone's interested.
Looks like Dad's gun was likely made towards the end of '62, so the March buy date on the receipt shows that the gun probably did not sit around long before he snatched it up.
I'm thinking you guys are on the right track about just getting another gun and leaving this one as is.
Not sure about selling it. There are siblings and relatives that may something to say about that, so I'll just have to wait and see.
Thanks everyone for your advice.
...dang, now I have to go gun shopping again.... ;)
As old as it is and the shape its in, you are on the right track. Just buy a new MKIV. Collectors will always want that one just the way it is do to its age and condition. Not to mention the sentimental value. The MKIV comes in several configurations and are a dream to take down to clean.
 

thorborg

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Sold mine, never really cared for it, and had no attachment to it. Definitely the pits to deep dissemble though doesn't really need it with any regularity, was tempted to apply the takedown mod available but decided to move it on and bought a Sportsman 999 revolver with no regrets.
More to your post, and just a thought, I can visualize new grips of thin hardwood laminated to, or hollowed out for, 1/8 or maybe 3/16" sheet lead, which may add the weight you desire, allowing you to keep you shooting it without altering the gun or memories.
Or; Possibly shape the lead, then overcoat it with a thick layer of epoxy, then paint. If you like to putter, could be a fun project too.
 

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