Ruger M77 Mk ll

I've got a 77/22 WMR. Wouldn't sell it for anything. Dead on reliable and accurate.
 
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Excellent rifles. About the best bang for the buck back in the 90's and early 2000's. Now you can find the Hawkeye's for exceptional deals at CDNN. Here's my take on the older M77 MKII:

1. Actions are a little rough, until you work them in.... Sometimes I polish out the inside of the receiver to make them feel more like a model 70...
2. Triggers are always heavy (infamous "lawyer trigger"). There are places on the interweb that will walk you through making these triggers a dream. I'm not going to post the link that a lot of guys use because I feel they take too much off the trigger and sear, thus making it a little questionable in the safe department. I always hone and polish mine so they are at 2.5 pounds and smooth, with very little (if any) creep.
3. The heavy kickers are known to crack stocks, so I always glass bed mine. I'll keep the factory pressure point in as well. I've tried them with freefloated barrels, but generally see no improvements in accuracy after doing this, so I've learned to leave the pressure point in. Gotts to be glass bedded though:
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Make sure you relieve a very small amount of stock (only a fingernails thickness of clearance is all you need) behind the tang, if it wasn't done at the factory. Mag box may need to be filed very slightly, so there is no binding of the receiver when you torque the action screws down to spec. This has been known to really affect accuracy, so something important to keep in mind...
4. Keep in mind, the receiver's are investment cast and are kind of a turn off to some guys. However, I've never seen a bad receiver in regards to strength. I have, however, seen some slightly blemished castings. Just something to be aware of....
5. Barrels are generally great and produce very good accuracy.
6. They are made in the USA!!!!! This means a lot to me. It may not to someone else though....
7. Only downfall is they are HEAVY, not by any means a lightweight rifle in terms of what you can buy in todays market: Say MKII vs. Tikka T3
8. Magazine capacity is only 4 for standard cartridges and 3 for magnum cartridges. Not a huge deal, but I'm kind of used to Winchester model 70's with a capacity of 5 and 3.... Even the Ruger m77 .223 rem, capacity is still only 4. However mag box modification is easily done so your capacity will be 6 for the little .223 rem. Ask me how I know this...;)
9. Keep a look out for the "boat paddle" stocked rifles. They are highly sought after and collectable to many. Thus, prices have gone up a lot on these models: If you can snag one for cheap, you better buy it...
10. Speaking of the "boat paddle" stocked models (AKA Zytel stocked rifles), have a really hard rubber recoil pad, that doesn't soak up any recoil. These can be changed out with Pachmayr pre-fit decelerators and pre-fit limbsavers, which really help reduce felt recoil and are (IMHO) a must-have on heavy recoiling magnum's.
11. The target model's have adjustable 2 stage triggers.
12. They come in left hand models.
13. They offer stainless and blued models, with and without iron sights.
14. True Controlled round feed (CRF), if that is any consolation...
15. 3 position wing safety.
16. Many models to chose from:
a. Stainless synthetic
b. Blued wood.
c. Ruger express
d. Ruger magnum Rifle
e. Standard with iron sights (M77RS)
f. All weather (stainless synthetic) with irons sights (KM77RSP)
g. All weather ultralight
h. Stainless laminated (KM77RBZ)
I. Ultra Light (m77RL)
j. Ruger international model (full stocked model) M77RSI MKII
There's more, I just can't remember all of them off the top of my head...:oops:

They also made them in rimfire versions as well. However, they didn't make a left hand rimfire (unfortunately). I know I left something out. Maybe it will come to me tomorrow...:p
 
My opinion of Ruger 77s, MKII's and Hawkeyes specifically?
I've owned S&W (Howa), Remington, Winchester (Pre 64, even), JC Higgins (FN Mauser) and Savage bolt actions along with my MKIIs and Hawkeyes. With the exception of guns previously owned by Dad and my grandpa, I only have Ruger bolt action rifles now.
To tack on a couple of notes about @bsa1917hunter s post:

The investment cast receiver and bolt are stronger than any comparable sized/styled action due to the control of the grain structure of the parts. You'll do all kinds of stupid stuff and won't shear the bolt lugs or explode the action. Google it, you may have to dig, but it's no lie.
Not all triggers are bad, but don't expect a great one out of the box. The LC6 of the Hawkeye is crisper, but still kinda heavy for my tastes. Every one I've used was very serviceable, but when shooting for precision some were more hindrance than help. Some were very good. I've done the spring and polish trick, but ended up dropping the bread for a Timney for the ones that I planned on keeping. However, the trigger on most of them have been better (lighter) than the Howa and Pre-64 Mod 70. The later Savage was adjustable and great.
Boat paddle (skeleton) stocks are only beautiful to the eye of the collector. The sling loops rattle and aren't removeable, the butt bad is a rock and they seem to do a better job of transferring, rather than absorbing, recoil. They ain't pretty, either.
The best integrated scope rings, ever.
They work. Always. (Don't get me started on bolt actions that can't.....)
Unfortunately, the varieties of the Hawkeye have been greatly reduced since the introduction of the American, and you don't see that many Ruger 77 MKIIs or Hawkeyes for sale. I think the guys and gals that buy them are pretty fond of them. I know I am.

FYI, My opinions are geared towards a gun that one uses for hunting.
 
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My primary hunting rifle IS a Ruger HawkEye in .30/06 and I also have the guide model laminate/stainless in .338 win mag, two of the best factory built rifles that I own. Nicely finished and very accurate rifles. hard not to choose a Ruger unless weight of a real rifle bothers you, but when the shooting gets tough and intense, there are few others I would choose!
 
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oremike

oremike

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Thanks to all. This is a Blue/Walnut 7mm Rem Mag and is left handed. I like that it is built to be left handed rather than a right handed rifle with a left hand bolt. I'll shoot it today with some loads left over from my tikka T-3. One thing I really like is the warmth in the wood over the cold plastic. I think I'm just generally done with plastic guns.
 
One thing I really like is the warmth in the wood over the cold plastic. I think I'm just generally done with plastic guns.
The wife and I were at Cabela's a month or so ago and I picked up a Ruger 77 in 7mm MAg. It was in a walnut stock that had gotten kind of dark and smooth, almost soft feeling. I get what you mean by "warmth". I'm not a 7mm fan and it wasn't a MKII so it was fairly easy to put in back on the rack. But it was sweet.

The plastic gun thing? Well, I am not easy on my rifle and this weather is usually very wet when it's hunting season here. I especially like the feel of a Hogue stock when it's wet and or cold.
 
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oremike

oremike

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I'll probably get a western Oregon plastic and stainless rifle but the 7 mag should be a long range open country rifle.
 
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Thanks to all. This is a Blue/Walnut 7mm Rem Mag and is left handed. I like that it is built to be left handed rather than a right handed rifle with a left hand bolt. I'll shoot it today with some loads left over from my tikka T-3. One thing I really like is the warmth in the wood over the cold plastic. I think I'm just generally done with plastic guns.
Sounds like a great rifle. Probably exactly like the 300wm I used to own. I commend Ruger for making true left hand rifles for some of us in our right mind...:p

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2ndtimer

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I am currently trying to decide between a Hawkeye in .270 Win. vs a Hawkeye in .308 Win. The .270 comes in a green Hogue rubber stock, and is $50 cheaper than the .308 in a conventional Ruger synthetic stock. Decisions, decisions. Or maybe I should celebrate my recent retirement and just buy both of them?
 
I'll probably get a western Oregon plastic and stainless rifle but the 7 mag should be a long range open country rifle.
The 7mm Rem Mag is fairly versatile depending on how you load for it. Use heavier bullets in the 160gr+ range at factory velocity that have some means of controlling expansion, and it ruins a lot less meat.

Actually, load a 140gr partition in a 270, 160gr partition in a 7mm RM, or 180gr partition in 30-06 or 300 WM, and you'll have a more versatile hunting rifle than most gun and ammo sellers would want to admit.
 
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Awfully hard choice between the mighty .270 and the .308! Me, I would choose the .270 for it's wind bucking, and flat shooting performance over the .308! In fact, the .270 is awfully close to the 7 mm mag out to any reasonable hunting distance, the big 7 just gets there a little bit faster! Personally, the .270 is why I don't have a 7 mm. JMHO
 
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Awfully hard choice between the mighty .270 and the .308! Me, I would choose the .270 for it's wind bucking, and flat shooting performance over the .308! In fact, the .270 is awfully close to the 7 mm mag out to any reasonable hunting distance, the big 7 just gets there a little bit faster! Personally, the .270 is why I don't have a 7 mm. JMHO
There's a lot to be said about the 270 Winchester. I've been messing around with RL 26 powder in mine and I'm getting exceptional speeds with the 150gr. nosler partition. The rifle is a 22" fwt, but runs an average of 2,920 fps with those pills. Threads very closely to a 7mm rem mag in both speed and trajectory. However, the 7mm rem mag is a damn fine cartridge as well....
 
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I am currently trying to decide between a Hawkeye in .270 Win. vs a Hawkeye in .308 Win. The .270 comes in a green Hogue rubber stock, and is $50 cheaper than the .308 in a conventional Ruger synthetic stock. Decisions, decisions. Or maybe I should celebrate my recent retirement and just buy both of them?
Well when you put it that way, I'd buy them both. Congrats on your recent retirement!!!!!
 
Awfully hard choice between the mighty .270 and the .308! Me, I would choose the .270 for it's wind bucking, and flat shooting performance over the .308! In fact, the .270 is awfully close to the 7 mm mag out to any reasonable hunting distance, the big 7 just gets there a little bit faster! Personally, the .270 is why I don't have a 7 mm. JMHO
And you get more capacity with a 270, longer brass life, and its mild recoil.
 

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