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ZigZagZeke

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"Cerberus, in Greek mythology, was the unpleasant multi-headed dog whose job it was to keep damned souls from escaping Hell. Cerberus, in 21st century America, is a holding company whose job it is to ruin gun makers."

No truer words were ever spoken. I once worked for a guy who ended up years later as a top executive for Cerberus. Jack was the driving force behind a maintenance philosophy called "run to failure". Whereby the value imparted to $100M worth of equipment by meticulously maintaining it in showroom condition over the course of 50 years could be extracted and added to the present bottom line. Of course, once it actually failed, you declared bankruptcy and walked away with the profits.

After ruining the company we both worked for he was hired by Cerberus and presided over the similar looting of several corporations they acquired. This is exactly what they did to Remington and other gun companies. There's profit in liquidating the production facilities, the brand name, the reputation, and the product. I hope all such corporate raiders die a slow and painful death.

That said, my first deer rifle was a Marlin 336C in .32 spc. It had a Lyman peep sight and a hooded front bead. I loved it, and can't for the life of me remember whatever possessed me to sell it. I'd happily buy another one in stainless and walnut, chambered in .357 Mag to match my S&W M66.
 
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The Heretic

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The other thing orgs like Cerebus do when they acquire a corporation; they offload a lot of debt from other corporations they own onto the corp they intend to run into the ground, then declare bankruptcy on the corp while keeping the $ from the debt & value (brand, IP, etc.) in the corps they hang onto. I don't recall if it was Cerebus that did this or some other corp that did it, maybe multiple corps, but I read a somewhat long history of how one corp did this with a number of gun/sports equipment corps.
 

Jonnyuma

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I would like to see a lever action design able to shoot a straight walled rifle cartridge like a taper-less 350 legend and also shoot 357 mag or 30/30 and shoot 30 carbine.
Man... that idea totes muh goats. If they can bring it in under $700, I'd stand in line.

I NEVER stand in lines.

There's a gap in the market for pistol caliber levers as indicated by the HUGE markup between say, a 30-30 and .38/.357 model. Even just straight-up 38/.357, 41 mag, and .44 mag offerings (without the ability to shoot the more powerful rifle cartridges) would be a good seller for Ruger if priced competitively. It also seems to be right up Ruger's alley.
My .357 Blackhawk and .44 SBH are DEMANDING it.
 
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The Heretic

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I would like to see a lever action design able to shoot a straight walled rifle cartridge like a taper-less 350 legend and also shoot 357 mag or 30/30 and shoot 30 carbine.
The problem with a lever or pump action shooting different length cartridges is that the feeding mechanisms generally cannot handle the different lengths. I am not even sure that the BHA lever actions can handle both .460 mag and .45 colt.

I have often fantasized about a .45-70 lever action that could also feed a .458 pistol length cartridge so that the lever action could shoot both rifle and pistol cartridges - the latter handgun being something more sane for carry than a .460 V. I have been tempted to get a BHA in .460 mag, but I already have a .45-70 and my 460V is so heavy and large that it doesn't make sense to carry both the revolver and the rifle at the same time - one or the other does make sense, and the .45-70 is better for the really heavy long projectiles, so having a BHA .460 mag lever action just isn't worth the cost ($3-4K to start with, by the time I had it configured the way I want, it would probably cost $5K+).
 

RVTECH

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In regards to the Marlin 336 sights...as in the traditional ones as issued ...they work well...If..
One takes the time to learn how to shoot with them.
AND they also work well IF the mfg. of the rifle uses (or makes) a quality Buckhorn to begin with. Poor quality Buckhorns are the reason for them being much-maligned.

A lot of what determines how well a Buckhorn will work is the blade design and how the groove is cut. Unfortunately a lot of Buckhorns have just a thin blade with a U or V groove stamped in them and they do not create as sharp of a sight picture as those that have thicker blades or the complete rear blade assembly as a one piece part that mounts on the tang.

The thicker the rear blade the better it focuses on the front sight especially if the groove is cut smoothly and blued or blackened. IT also helps if the notch is slightly beveled forward.

Post '64 Winchester sights were pretty good as they had a fairly thick, solid rear blade that could be adjusted on the tang and gave a pretty good sight picture.

The worst Buckhorn I have ever experienced is the one that came on My Henry. It was made by Marbles but obviously a mass produced, low end one not meant to be used much, or for any serious shooting. The blade was tiny, hard to adjust and eventually I dropped it on the carpet and it got vacuumed up! Heck, I have heard about some removing the blade and using the the cutout notch for the blade to sight with - and it ain't half bad!

The design of the front sight is also an important part of a Buckhorn working well as it needs to match the groove of the rear. E.G. a 'bead' style front matches a 'U' groove rear better than a flat blade but a lot of this is personal preference.
 
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RVTECH

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The mags from 77/357 could be worked into a lever platform somehow.
Pure fantasy on my part.
Lets keep it fantasy on your part!

No need to create some franken/hybrid out of a traditional design as the 336.
I have to wonder if there will be any glitches at all.
I am hoping few to none given Rugers' generally pretty good quality.

I am wondering how the investment cast receiver is going to be accepted. Heck, it may not even be an issue considering many probably don't know cast from billet machined.
 
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I do not own a MADE IN CT Marlin 336C (Walnut/Blued) rifle in 30-30 Winchester any longer. (I only shoot 22lr and 22wmr rifles now.)

My husband still owns a MADE IN CT Marlin 336 rifle (30-30 Win.) in Walnut and Stainless Steel.

He still owns a MADE IN CT Marlin Classic '1895' 45-70 rifle in Walnut and Blued Steel.

So he only owns 2 lever action rifles now. BOTH in CF. I own zero lever action rifles now.

He and I think that they should KEEP the Marlin 336 models as they were made in CT and that goes for the Classic '1895' 45-70 rifles and the Classic Golden 39A rifles.

(Our two CT Marlin Golden 39A rifles were sold too.)

My husband gifted and sold many CT Marlin rifles over the years in various other calibers and in the same calibers as above too. He sold and gifted MANY other firearms in his lifetime too.

They (RUGER) should not go crazy when it comes to a zillion and one models/versions of a CLASSIC rifle design - the MODEL 336.

I think that they should use the KISS method of KEEP IT SIMPLE STUPID.

If RUGER can get those 3 CLASSIC Marlin designs and firearm calibers going in 30-30 Winchester, 45-70 Government and in 22lr... then they can try to bring back some other firearm calibers into the MIX as they had in the past but ONLY if they can SATISFY their customers and make a good quality and beautiful rifle in my opinion.

Side note: I ALWAYS USED IRON SIGHTS on every single lever action rifle that I owned. Every single brand. The same as I do now with my bolt action rifles (CZ) and the same as I did with the ONLY semi automatic rifle that I EVER bought/owned which was a MADE IN CT Marlin Papoose with the blue bag. The Papoose was sold years ago too.

Cate

Added more and a typo.
 
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Hopefully Ruger will be a good caretaker of the Marlin lever guns.
I shot my Remlin 45-70 22" the other day for the first time.
Fit and finish are excellent and it would shoot into the same hole if I could hold it well enough.
It's true, the later Remlins are good guns.
Using the 325gr Hornady ammo.
Skinner Alaskan peep combined with OEM front sight was right on.
 
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The problem with a lever or pump action shooting different length cartridges is that the feeding mechanisms generally cannot handle the different lengths. I am not even sure that the BHA lever actions can handle both .460 mag and .45 colt.

I have often fantasized about a .45-70 lever action that could also feed a .458 pistol length cartridge so that the lever action could shoot both rifle and pistol cartridges - the latter handgun being something more sane for carry than a .460 V. I have been tempted to get a BHA in .460 mag, but I already have a .45-70 and my 460V is so heavy and large that it doesn't make sense to carry both the revolver and the rifle at the same time - one or the other does make sense, and the .45-70 is better for the really heavy long projectiles, so having a BHA .460 mag lever action just isn't worth the cost ($3-4K to start with, by the time I had it configured the way I want, it would probably cost $5K+).
How about a 480 Ruger? That looked and shot something like one of these:

Lots of fellers have written how awesome it is to have a rifle and a handgun in the same caliber. And in a carbine length, a 357 and other calibers come in their own at about 200-300 fps faster than out of a revolver. However, there's a lot more practicality to having a rifle in a true rifle caliber (that has no business in a revolver, like a BFR in 444 marlin!) and a handgun in something that is practical in its own right.
 

ZigZagZeke

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The design of the front sight is also an important part of a Buckhorn working well as it needs to match the groove of the rear. E.G. a 'bead' style front matches a 'U' groove rear better than a flat blade but a lot of this is personal preference.
This is one of the tricks to small bore target competition. You get a front aperture sight with a ring insert sized such that the inner hole in the insert just fits the black area on the target at the range you are shooting, so that when it is exactly on target there is no white showing. Then you size the rear aperture the same way, so that the outer diameter of the front ring insert just fits inside the rear aperture when you are sighting. Thus when you are dead on, no white paper shows at all, and if there's any deviation you see a slice of white.
 
Hopefully Ruger will be a good caretaker of the Marlin lever guns.
I shot my Remlin 45-70 22" the other day for the first time.
Fit and finish are excellent and it would shoot into the same hole if I could hold it well enough.
It's true, the later Remlins are good guns.
Using the 325gr Hornady ammo.
Skinner Alaskan peep combined with OEM front sight was right on.
I've got the Remlin 1895 GBL, 45-70. Same here, exactly zero quality issues with it. Amazing fit and finish(but i'm working on that :p).
 
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