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Review of the Aqua Pod Emergency Water Storage system

Discussion in 'Preparedness & Survival' started by liquidsys, Nov 11, 2015.

  1. liquidsys

    liquidsys North Bend, WA Disciple of the Gun

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    I bought one of these off amazon recently. Looked at a bunch of them. Aqua Pod, Water Bob, cheap knockoffs etc. Settled on the Aqua Pod as I got a deal on it, and knew I was buying two. One for testing, one for emergency use. I personally hate buying something without every truly knowing how it'd work, and there wasn't any reviews online that discussed function.

    After spending about an hour with it in total, fully deployed, I'd highly recommend one. It's main benefit is that for most of your life, it'll hopefully just sit on a shelf in a compact little box. When you need it though, it deploys in seconds and you might gain 65-130 gallons in fresh water, per unit you own. Water will also store much longer in these systems then an open air tub if you had to go that route, not even getting into the sanitation of that situation.

    This certainly doesn't replace existing supply storage and rotations etc, it's just that potential added storage capability that doesn't occupy any more space than you have now. Fantastic for apartments or small homes.

    Anyway, if anyones curious about the actual step by step deployment experience, I wrote a longer review on my blog about the Aqua Pod emergency water storage system. If this is violating rules by linking it here since it's my own blog, please let me know and I"ll nuke the link immediately and refrain from doing so again.

    Link to my review with images and such:
    http://www.gskineticsblog.com/reviewing-the-aqua-pod-emergency-water-storage-system/
     
  2. bolus

    bolus Portland Gold Supporter Gold Supporter 2015 Volunteer 2016 Volunteer

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    I have one of these stored away. Anyone know in the setting some something like a large earthquake, how long does the tap water keep running? I wondered if I'd even have time to fill one of these up in a large cascadia earthquake.
     
  3. liquidsys

    liquidsys North Bend, WA Disciple of the Gun

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    That really depends on your area. Is water served by gravity systems? Did major water mains remain intact enough to get water to your residence? Is your municipal water supply require power?

    Immediately after an earthquake or major event, I'd start filling these up instantly. Mine took about 7 minutes to fill from empty to full using only cold water (retain the water in your water heater too!). I don't know of any major event off the top of my head that shut water down to 100% of a city in that quick of a timeframe, so I'll let others chime in on that front if they have real data.

    Jesse
     
  4. billcoe

    billcoe PDX Platinum Supporter Platinum Supporter

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    Thanks liquidsys, great review. Netarts went without water for 2 weeks not long ago when a simple windstorm blew over a tree who's roots tore up a water main causing the entire reservoir to drain. In that instance, I suspect that no one knew they were going to be without water until the tap went dry and by then it would be too late to deploy this. I'm not saying they don't have value, they clearly do. I bought a couple. They would work in something like a Mount Hood eruption where folks had time to prep and Bull run would look like a mudslide area instead of a pure water source. The city of PDX has backup water sources but it could still be real problematic if that kind of event occurred in the dry months of summer. Thanks again for the review. they look like a great addition to the prep pile.
     
  5. liquidsys

    liquidsys North Bend, WA Disciple of the Gun

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    Yeah they definitely don't solve all water problems, but for the cheap price and ease of storage, it's hard not to justify having 1 or 2 for backup in instances where you know ahead of time there is a chance of a problem.

    Even in your own scenario, it might behoove someone to start storing water in advance if you know of a major windstorm coming. I liken it to going out and buying another brick of batteries from Costco ahead of stormy season. ;)

    Jesse