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Restore a little faith in humanity thread

Discussion in 'Off Topic' started by husker, May 5, 2013.

  1. husker

    husker portland Active Member

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    mar.png


    Cody Green was a 12-year kid in Indiana who was diagnosed with leukemia at 22 months old. He loved the Marines, and his parents said he drew strength and courage from the Marine Corps. as ...
    he bravely fought the battle into remission three times. Although he was cancer-free at the time, the chemotherapy had lowered his immune system and he developed a fungus infection that attacked his brain. Two weeks ago, as he struggled to fend off that infection in the hospital, the Marines wanted to show how much they respected his will to live, his strength, honor and courage. They presented Cody with Marine navigator wings and named him an honorary member of the United States Marine Corps. For one Marine, that wasn’t enough ... so that night, before Cody Green passed away, he took it upon himself to stand guard at Cody’s hospital door all night long, 8 hours straight
     
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  2. Galant

    Galant portland Active Member

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    Thats an amazing story. Thank you for sharing it. I had my doubts entering this thread but this does give me a little hope.
     
  3. husker

    husker portland Active Member

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    Thats what I was going for. So much doom and gloom we need to hear some good stories. Post them up guys and girls.
     
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  4. Sstrand

    Sstrand La Grande OR Well-Known Member

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    He will likely be court-martialed . . .

    Sheldon
     
  5. husker

    husker portland Active Member

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  6. samuelm16

    samuelm16 se pdx Well-Known Member

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    dont read thru this thread or your allergies might start acting up!
     
  7. Ironbar

    Ironbar Tigard, OR Well-Known Member

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    Here you go!

    [video]http://www.wimp.com/kindnesscompilation/[/video]
     
  8. mosinguy1

    mosinguy1 out by the ocean Active Member

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    My Wife laughs when my allergies act up over these kinda of stories, it reminds her I do have a soft side.
     
  9. Father of four

    Father of four Portland, Oregon Well-Known Member

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    Well played Marines!!!! :thumbup:
     
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  10. DieselScout

    DieselScout S Clackamas County Well-Known Member

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    Reminds me of this one.

    02.jpg

     
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  11. husker

    husker portland Active Member

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    This story is just too good not to share. We've known the Sextons for years, and always known they were nice folks. This confirms it.

    One of the owners of Sexton's Exxon & Towing, Mark, was in Subway for lunch on Aug 21. While there, he chatted with the employee and learned that the guy's car (a '91 Explorer) was broken down and he was riding a bicycle to work while saving to fix it. Said he'd saved $100 so far. The guy, Cody, was in good spirits and complimenting Mark's Jeep, and Mark posted later in the evening on Facebook that he just admired the guy's attitude and was moved at how positive he was given his situation.

    The post had lots of replies, and someone suggested that if several pitched in, we might be able to help the kid. With several of us ready to help, Mark agreed to apply any contributions toward fixing Cody's car. He went back to the Subway a few days later to let Cody know he was going to have help getting his car fixed, and the poor guy had wrecked his bike on the way to work, skinned his leg all up, and was still there working and smiling! Mark told him they'd like to help, and the guy was shocked that a stranger would care enough to help him like that.

    Mark got Cody's vehicle back to the shop and realized it had so many problems it basically wasn't worth fixing. By this point contributions had continued to come in, and it was decided they'd be better off just finding another vehicle. Another friend offered a '94 Explorer for a deal, and Mark purchased it. It was delivered to Cody at Subway this morning...

    Mark could have smiled back at Cody that first day, and never asked his name or cared about his story. But he took the time to care, and I just think that's awesome.
    __________________
     
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  12. NoFlinch

    NoFlinch In a van down by the river Owner of Cocaine addicted dog.

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    I pre-paid, after inspecting, a load of firewood from a nice girl who was moving back east with her husband & family.

    I went to pick it up this morning, loaded most of it from one pile out in the back, and went to load the 1/3 cord stacked under the porch.

    OOPS! She had sold that wood to someone else!!

    Excuses and lies later, I just walked away and wished them good luck in Virginia.

    I guess I'M the good story here......I shoulda' sued them for MILLIONS!!!!!

    I'm gona' "play it forward" sometime soon, when the circumstances present themselves........it always comes back, even if that is not your motivation to do it......:)
     
  13. husker

    husker portland Active Member

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    Cameron Lyle, a Division I college athlete in New Hampshire, has decided to shorten his athletic career for a chance to save a life.
    The University of New Hampshire senior will donate bone marrow Wednesday, a decision that abruptly ends his collegiate athletic career but one that he calls a "no brainer."
    Lyle, 21, had his mouth swabbed to join a bone marrow registry two years ago in the cafeteria at school. He didn't think any more of it until a few months ago when he got a phone call that he might be a match. He took more tests and discovered a month later that he was a perfect match.
    "When they first told me, I was like, 'OK, cool. I'm definitely going to do it,'" Lyle said. "After that I kind of went to tell my coach and then I realized slowly that my season was over."
    Lyle's main events are the shot put and the hammer throw.
    "It's just a sport," he said. "Just because it's Division I college level doesn't make it any more important. Life is a lot more important than that, so it was pretty easy."
    Lyle competed in his last competition Saturday and said it was "kind of emotional." His teammates rallied around him to cheer him on.
    The man who needs his help is a 28-year-old suffering from acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Lyle was told that the man only has six months to live without the transplant.
    Lyle of Plaistow, N.H., said he had been told there was a one in five million chance for a non-family match.
    "It was kind of a no-brainer for a decent human," Lyle said. "I couldn't imagine just waiting. He could have been waiting for years for a match. I'd hope that someone would donate to me if I needed it."
    After he got the call, Lyle knew he needed to speak to his mom and his coach.
    "My son and I have a pretty funny rapport together so when he tells me things, it's usually in humor," mom Chris Sciacca said. "He simply sent me a text that said, 'So I guess I have a chance to save someone's life.'"
    The two sat down and talked through the decision, but Sciacca said it was ultimately a decision that "came from his heart."
    "We talked about in five or 10 years, is he going to look back and say, 'Damn, I wish I went to that track conference,' or is he going to say, 'Damn, I saved someone's life," she said.
    "I know my son very well and I know where his heart is and I knew that he would make the right decision.
    "He made his decision. He gave up his college season to do this. He's a gentle giant," Sciacca said of her 6-foot-2-inch, 255-pound son. "He'll do anything for anybody."
    What Lyle was most nervous about was telling Coach Jim Boulanger, who has been his coach for four years.
    Boulanger said that a nervous Lyle came into his office, shut the door and told him he wouldn't be able to throw next month at the America East Conference championship for which he had been training.
    When Boulanger asked why, Lyle told him and found that his coach was completely supportive.
    "Here's the deal," Boulanger told Lyle. "You go to the conference and take 12 throws or you could give a man three or four more years of life. I don't think there's a big question here. This is not a moral dilemma. There's only one answer."
    Boulanger said he's "very proud" of his athlete.
    "He's very approachable. He's very funny," Boulanger said. "I don't have any doubt that he's very compassionate and it was just a given that he'd do it.
    "You can't ask for any more out of a person than to help another person," he said.
    Lyle's mother is just as proud.
    "I am beyond words proud. He is my hero," Sciacca said. "When your children inspire you to be better people, you know it's come full circle and he's inspired his mom to be a better circle."
    Lyle will make the bone marrow donation Wednesday morning at Boston's Massachusetts General Hospital. A needle will be used to withdraw liquid bone marrow from his pelvic bone. After the surgery, he will not be allowed to lift more than 20 pounds over his head, which rules out all his athletic events.
    Lyle and the man have to remain anonymous to each other for at least a year, but can then sign consent forms to release their identities if they want.
    "I really want to meet him," Lyle said, "and I hope he wants to meet me."
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