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Reloads, who is teaching?

Discussion in 'Ammunition & Reloading' started by Flakman5000, May 24, 2009.

  1. Flakman5000

    Flakman5000 Oregon New Member

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    I want to start doing reloads, but don't want to do it unless someone that really knows how to do it proper can show me the steps. I just don't want to destroy one of my guns or myself in the process.
     
  2. aquariumjunky

    aquariumjunky Albany, Oregon Active Member

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    I am pretty good and knowledgeable about pistol rounds. and would be willing to help show ya. I use a dillon square deal. If you want rifle rounds I am not your guy. but willing to help with questions anyhow neverknow what is in my brain. (i don't)

    Steven

    some quicky advice get a quality reloading manuel and read and then what ever kind of press you get take it slow. If you have any mechanical aptitue it is pretty easy just be careful.
     
  3. Twodogs

    Twodogs portland Or Active Member

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    Where are you located?
    Do you have your own reloading gear?
    I'm in se PDX and have been reloading for about 35yrs.

    Twodogs
     
  4. Bend

    Bend Central OR Member

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    Ditto here in Bend.
     
  5. toys

    toys PDX Member

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    whoever you choose to learn from, just be carfull. just because they reload, doesnt mean they know what it takes or are carefull in what they do.

    ive seen a guy smoking while reloading. although it may not be an issue, i dont see why a person would do it and push his luck.

    one comment tho.

    before you do go an learn from someone, readup on the reloading process and the terminology so you have an idea on whats being said.
     
  6. MWS

    MWS Oregon City,OR Member

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    Different how to links and remember just because it's on the web doesn't make it true. In the 2nd link they use visegrip plires to remove bullets. There are bullet removal tools that are available that will not damage the bullets:

    http://www.ehow.com/how_4529363_reload-own-ammunition.html

    http://www.reloadammo.com/relsteps.htm

    Reload data link :

    http://data.hodgdon.com/main_menu.asp

    Powder burn rate charts:

    http://home.hiwaay.net/~stargate/powder/powder.htm

    http://www.reloadbench.com/burn.html
     
  7. motoman98

    motoman98 Gresham, OR Active Member

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    Best advice is, first step:
    Read the instructions found in the loading manuals....
    buy at least two.
    Read them well.
    Then set up per the books, don't skimp on equipment.
    When you get totally set up, per what you've read, then you might have a 'sperienced guy check you out.

    Note: Check case length for rifle, (trim if necessary)
    Check bullet tension for pistol(loaded rounds)
    Overlength rifle brass and pistol bullets pushed inwards=
    dangerous high pressures you can avoid.
     
    Last edited: May 24, 2009
  8. orygun

    orygun West Linn Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

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    Boy, that was a long time ago! I bought a complete Lyman turret press kit from a friend. It had everything I needed except the dies. The first caliber was a straight wall .41 Magnum and I used carbide dies. Everything else I needed to know came straight out of the Lyman manual. Even if you are loading rounds from data in a different manual, find a Lyman manual and spend time reading BEFORE you touch anything. It's written as if you don't know anything, which I didn't at that time. If you are the slightest bit mechanically inclined, you'll be fine.
    Don't be afraid to double check EVERYTHING!!!
    I've since moved on to a Dillon RL550B progressive for my pistol rounds, but use that ol' Lyman for every single one of my rifle rounds to this day.

    Anyway, the Lyman manual has more data than any other and has more helpful info for a newbie. Get one and get started!

    ps. My wife bought the Dillon for me. And the RCBS digital scale I use now. How sweet is that?:)
     
    Last edited: May 24, 2009
  9. ZeroRing

    ZeroRing 26th District, WA Active Member

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    +1 on the Lyman manual. They are very informative and tend to have data from several different manufacturers rather than being geared towards any particular bullet.

    That being said though, it's still a good idea to have several different manuals on hand. The ones made by the manufacturers of the bullets you tend to choose for your loads are the minimums I'd recommend. I have Nosler, Speer, and Hornady reloading manuals in addition to the trusty ole Lyman.

    I recently purchased an updated Lyman and will probably update the others soon as well. The "older" ones are still good though and make great "donations" to friends who are considering taking up the habit. :D
     
  10. tionico

    tionico Thurston County Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for all the solid counsel, guys.... reloading is the "next new territory" for me in this whole game..... and I want to do it right, first time. Sounds like great advice, here.....
     
  11. Flakman5000

    Flakman5000 Oregon New Member

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    Thanks for the info. I think I'll hit up that lyman manual first.
     
  12. orygun

    orygun West Linn Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

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    I agree with Zeroring completely. It was soo long ago that I forgot that I had the new (at the time) Hornady book, too, because I was loading Hornady bullets.
    I believe that you will run into more variations with bullets (length, material, bearing surface length, etc.) with rifle loads than handguns, but the advice to use the manual of the bullet manufacturer is very valid.
    Hodgdon has a website that lists their powders for most calibers that is bullet specific. It's free and it's where I was able to find cartridges that weren't yet available in the manuals. (500 S&W, 375 Ruger)

    As long as you are very cautions and don't start at the max loadings, you'll have fun, be safe and save MONEY! Plus, if you're like a lot of us, you'll get the satisfaction of having done it your self.
     
  13. Bend

    Bend Central OR Member

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    Along with the other motherly advice here, let me add this. You will not save any money by reloading. Not 1 cent. However, you will shoot more. :D
     
  14. Grizzly_A

    Grizzly_A Portland Metro Area Member

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    :D You will however probably end up with a more accurate load than factory if you do a little load testing. Shooting more, more accurate ammo, how is this not a bad plan!
     
  15. Bend

    Bend Central OR Member

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    If that is your goal as compared to just plinking. Also, If you want accurate do not go cheap on your components!
     
  16. ZeroRing

    ZeroRing 26th District, WA Active Member

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    +1 on that!! :thumbup: