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reloading 5.7x28

Discussion in 'Ammunition & Reloading' started by Stevenav, Jul 5, 2013.

  1. Stevenav

    Stevenav Redmond Active Member

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    Hey all,

    I was wondering about the viability of reloading 5.7x28 rounds.

    I know that there are dies and plates for various presses for reloading the rounds... but I'm wondering what people's experiences are with reloading them are.

    What sort of bullets would you recommend for reloading them for example, prefered powder for em, what primers would you steer clear of?

    Thing is, here's what I've heard from some people on it.

    1. That before you get started, you can't sonic wash the brass, or tumble it normally. You should instead wash them with a solution of 10:1 Water to simple green so as to keep the propietary coating intact on the brass for smooth ejection.
    2. That you have to trim ever single cartridge down before even thinking of reloading and that the tollerances are very small.
    3. That you can only get 2 or at most 3 reloads out of the brass before it's flat outright done.
    4. That you have to be extra careful with the loads because it's really really easy to overcharge the round and crack brass

    Some I've talked to have said it's flat outright not worth the time to reload 5.7... But with it at 39-50 a box retail... I'm interested in investigating at the very least.

    So, can anyone speak about their reloading experiences with 5.7x28 or maybe relay what they've heard?

    Appreciated

    -Steve
     
  2. ripcity

    ripcity Milwaukie Active Member

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    Imo it's worth reloading. I use the 40gr z max and true blue powder on a turret press. Very slow but it only cost me 160 a thousand. Look at fiveseven forum for more information.
     
  3. deadshot2

    deadshot2 NW Quadrant WA State Well-Known Member

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    The 5.7X28 round has some issues for the reloader. It's a necked cartridge and when fired in a pistol designed for it the shoulder has a tendency to move forward rather drastically. If not properly re-sized then there is a great risk that the pistol will fire out of battery, given the right combination of circumstances. This has been heavily discussed on 5.7x28 forums.

    Best way to insure that the case is properly sized, and the shoulder formed in the proper position, anneal after every firing. That one step can go a long way to preventing a problem you many not have experienced ------------yet.

    Just like reloading for any other round, it can save money, produce more accuracy, but all cautions need to be taken to understand the particular rounds potential problems.
     
  4. Stevenav

    Stevenav Redmond Active Member

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    Thanks deadshot.

    Re annealing, I have some questions here that I hope you'll not think are stupid newbie questions


    1. I've heard that you need to take the casing to 751 degrees F to anneal it and then just let it cool on its own, correct or not? (no quench needed)

    2. Won't annealing the cartridge completely destroy the laq coating on it? This seems problematic to me because if you take it up to 751 degrees wont the coating burn off?... this is where I think a problem comes up. The coating for the cartridges is a proprietary laq... and thus not available to the general public... do you have a way around this? Is there an after market laq that is available?

    3. Re the resizing... I have lee dies for the 5.7x28 (no crimping die because they never made one for that... but I'm using the resizing die and the lee cutter/trimmer with the cartridge pin . Should this be sufficient?

    4. Neck move- I know the resizing die won't relieve stress created in the cartridge case (just force the neck back to where it's supposed to be) but what's people's experience on the lee dies regarding getting the neck back where it's supposed to be?

    Okay on to the bullets.

    I'm looking at the various .224 ammo types out there... What is recommended by most people?
    It's going to be fired through a ps 90 if that makes a difference.

    I've heard that I'll want low gr weights under 50 and more in the 40 range. Accurate?

    Is it possible to cast wheel weight antimony hardened ingots into a bullet for this or is it copper only? If yes, where can I get moulds for this?
     
  5. deadshot2

    deadshot2 NW Quadrant WA State Well-Known Member

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    Some quick thoughts.

    First of all, if a case requires a laquer coating to function properly then I wouldn't reload it----period. That's just me. Even the act of sizing will compromise a coating like this and again, if required for functioning in the firearm, then I pass.

    That aside, annealing is really not "annealing" in the metallurgical sense when done by reloaders. True annealing requires both TEMP and TIME. We are just "Stress Relieving" which in a brass case occurs arount the 700-900 degree mark and in a very short time.

    When you heat a brass case, at the shoulder forward to the neck only, once you've achieved the desired temp (which I measure with a "heat crayon" that melts at 750 degrees, then remove the case from the flame and it will begin to cool rapidly. There isn't enough mass in the shoulder/neck area to retain enough heat energy to compromise the strength of the case head/web. It's not necessary to drop in water. If you want to pick up the cases soon after annealing, and you don't want them wet, just use a small dia. portable fan (desktop types are great) and blow air over the cases you've dropped out of whatever heatsink device used to turn the case in the flame. I use an impact style socket (probably said that 100 times but I tend to repeat myself) and a cordless drill. Keeps the initial flame heat away from the case head and keeps me from burning my fingers.

    As for sizing dies, they all work. Some cost more and have fancier boxes. Some claim to be made of superior materials and polished inside by little fairies with magic dust. Like I said, they all work. To make them work right get a case gauge which will let you adjust the sizing die properly so you don't push the shoulder back too far.

    On cast bullets in .223, I don't 'cause I like mine to go real fast. Faster you go, the more you're locked into a jacketed bullet. For short range, low speed, cast is OK.

    If you want cheap bullets for so-so accuracy (Killing watermelon, cantaloupe, tomato's, eggs, golf balls, etc) the get a case of 55 gr FMJ-BT from Montana Gold. They work and I've fed 10's of thousands through 3 AR's and a Bolt action.