What type of medical gear do you regularly carry?

  • Don’t need it, I can just call 911

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Tourniquet only

    Votes: 2 9.1%
  • Tourniquet and a little more (explain)

    Votes: 13 59.1%
  • Tourniquet and A LOT MORE (explain)

    Votes: 2 9.1%
  • Nothing right now, but I think I should…

    Votes: 5 22.7%

  • Total voters
    22
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I think the point is being missed. No one is arguing that a TQ kit is worthless or won't potentially save a life. The topic seemed to be EDC kit. They're a little single purpose and bulky to stuff in your pockets, but anyone is welcome to pack one every day of their lives in the very highly unlikely event they would ever be faced with a life threatening bleeder, in an extremity, it's you, and one of your arms has been rendered inoperable. 🤣

Personally, I think the probability of those sets of circumstances to all line up... that packing a TQ kit is going to be absolutely life or death... is astronomically minimal.

IMHO, the whole point of an EDC kit is to have readily available items that will cover a wide array of "probable" circumstances that may save a life. To ME, a TQ kit doesn't make the list. Either does an epi-pen, an anti-venom kit, glucagon.. or a multitude of others that would be much more highly likely to be encounterable, life saving, and not improviseable... like a TQ is. ;)

I didn't mean to offend anyone or demean their TQ kits. I've never even considered one as practical/useful for EDC and was just curious if there were some other features or multi uses I wasn't aware of that seemed to make them such a hot EDC item. There are new innovations every day so... it's always good to be curious. We would never learn anything, otherwise.

I'm done.👍
You’re more likely to use a TQ than a gun. But I bet you carry one of those everyday….

I’m also done.
 
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Packing the junctions is one of the most missed of these three critical steps. If you get a chance take a "stop the bleed" course at your local medical center/hospital as the knowledge is invaluable to have.
 
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Thankfully it doesn’t take much skill or training to be able to adequately apply a tourniquet.
I disagree. Too little pressure or too much does not always help. Of course, more is better than less but it is important to know the balance. After all, in an emergency, rules are bent a lot.
 
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Maybe they failed because they were improperly applied. Personally, i would not use a waist belt that needs to have a new hole punched to meet the smaller diameter. Cinch belts are best in the belt options, but you HAVE TO KNOW what you are doing, which comes from emergency training.
Well... the type doesn't matter so much. IYou're not trying to use the belt characteristics itself to apply the appopriate pressure. It simply makes a secure and strong "loop" suitable for constriction with a windlass. TBH though, belts are usually pretty wide, stiff and don't "spin up" well on a lever. Applying pressure over such a broad area it can be a real PITA to position and get cranked up sufficiently to be effective. If that's all you got though.... it's DOABLE.

Improvised... I would take a rolled shirt sleeve or similar over a belt. Purse or backpack strap? In a building setting, medium sized cords abound. Shoelaces and similarly thin stuff is so narrow there is a concern of over constriction and excessive tissue damage. If its life or death though.. you do what you gotta do.
 
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I disagree. Too little pressure or too much does not always help. Of course, more is better than less but it is important to know the balance. After all, in an emergency, rules are bent a lot.
If it stops bleeding, it’s enough, right?
 
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You’re more likely to use a TQ than a gun. But I bet you carry one of those everyday….
I DO! But I also use my firearm for purposes other than poking holes in 2 legged animals.

I spend a great deal of time boondocking and in the outdoors. It comes in handy. It's also the only tool I have available to poke holes in 2 legged animals from a safe distance... who are likely trying to do the same to me, or those I care about, so... not a lot of options for improvisation, right? ;)
 
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I DO! But I also use my firearm for purposes other than poking holes in 2 legged animals.

I spend a great deal of time boondocking and in the outdoors. It comes in handy. It's also the only tool I have available to poke holes in 2 legged animals from a safe distance... who are likely trying to do the same to me, or those I care about, so... not a lot of options for improvisation, right? ;)
I thought you were done….
 
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This post makes me rethink about my second retirement choice for sure. But loads of training courses for firearms but not near as many for the medical side. Someone said above more likely to render medical than engaging weapon. So true! Unfortunately not a lot see it that way.
 
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Improvised TQs are a great way to cause massive soft tissue damage. Using things like shoe laces or 550 cord, you are likely to lose the limb.

Better than bleeding out, but do with that info what you want.
 
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yes, of course. But too tight for too long can lead to unnecessay tissue death, if not too severe of an injury.
True, but the point of a tourniquet is that if it is not used the person will bleed out and die. If it’s not a severe injury the tourniquet is generally not necessary anyway. Direct pressure and other bandage methods are always better IF they can in fact sufficiently stop blood flow, but if they can’t, that is why the tourniquet is used. The concern of tissue death and it being too tight or too long on the body is relatively entirely irrelevant because the person would have died without it, if the tourniquet was in fact used when it should be.

A lot of the medical doctrine around tourniquets is with the caveat that modern medical care is available after the tourniquet is applied and that it is used as a short term way to stop major hemorrhage to prevent the patient from bleeding to death when other blood loss prevention methods would not be successful.
 
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True, but the point of a tourniquet is that if it is not used the person will bleed out and die. If it’s not a severe injury the tourniquet is generally not necessary anyway. Direct pressure and other bandage methods are always better IF they can in fact sufficiently stop blood flow, but if they can’t, that is why the tourniquet is used. The concern of tissue death and it being too tight or too long on the body is relatively entirely irrelevant because the person would have died without it, if the tourniquet was in fact used when it should be.

A lot of the medical doctrine around tourniquets is with the caveat that modern medical care is available after the tourniquet is applied and that it is used as a short term way to stop major hemorrhage to prevent the patient from bleeding to death when other blood loss prevention methods would not be successful.
I understand perfectly your point and take no offence but what I was trying to point out was from a medical practicioners point is that, yes, in an emergency and when the threat is gone, using the tourniquet appropriately when needed can stop the bleed and save the limb if not a total loss. What do i mean by total loss: bear or big cat attack claws your limb pretty good but saveable (imagine saving your loved one, ....you will try), or fast bullet shatters your leg or arm bone but saveable, or a mechanical collision of sort but saveable. As a somewhat retired medic, we are taught to save all until you cannot.

If the limb is hanging by the skin, cut the sucker!

All possible and extreme scenarios but unique in so many ways.
 
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I understand perfectly your point and take no offence but what I was trying to point out was from a medical practicioners point is that, yes, in an emergency and when the threat is gone, using the tourniquet appropriately when needed can stop the bleed and save the limb if not a total loss. What do i mean by total loss: bear or big cat attack claws your limb pretty good but saveable (imagine saving your loved one, ....you will try), or fast bullet shatters your leg or arm bone but saveable, or a mechanical collision of sort but saveable. As a somewhat retired medic, we are taught to save all until you cannot.

If the limb is hanging by the skin, cut the sucker!

All possible and extreme scenarios but unique in so many ways.
Yep, agreed. The tourniquet is not the end all be all to medical trauma care. It is a very specific niche item that when used properly will save the life, but if proper care if not taken, unnecessary damage to the limb or tissue will take place.
 
Well if I shot someone and for some strange reason needed to perform CPR to keep them alive, I’m glad they changed it and got rid of the mouth to mouth portion
because that means I can now repeatedly do chest compressions with both feet at once!
There have been instances where mouth to mouth has spread Fentynal to the lifesaver, who then passed away. Will never do it again.
 

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