What type of medical gear do you regularly carry?

  • Don’t need it, I can just call 911

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Tourniquet only

    Votes: 2 9.1%
  • Tourniquet and a little more (explain)

    Votes: 13 59.1%
  • Tourniquet and A LOT MORE (explain)

    Votes: 2 9.1%
  • Nothing right now, but I think I should…

    Votes: 5 22.7%

  • Total voters
    22
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:s0140: I guess no one uses belts, shirts, socks, shoelaces, purse straps, etc... any more? No one has the basic understanding on how to improvise a tourniquet any more?

I see. I guess I just look at an EDC "essentials" kit to be ""low bulk" and contain items that would be called into regular use under common living circumstances on a fairly routine basis. Carrying a large bulk item EDC that is highly likely to never be used, when other readily available implements exist that will do the same job, doesn't fall into my definition of "essentials".

I was just curious. Carry on!👍
Don’t carry one then. No one here is forcing you to. It’s your life. I also don’t believe in micro pistols. You would probably claim what I carry on my person everyday is “bulky.” But it’s what I carry. I’m not trusting my life on a belt or t shirt. I’ve seen that fail before. I carry a full size pistol, two knives, extra mag, light and TQ. What’s bulky to you is normal to others. Take it for what it’s worth.
 
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I get it. I've actually been part and party on 2 seperate occassions when a tourniquet (improvised) was applied, and likely saved their life. I'm not knocking tourniquets in general. Having witnessed them saving a life though doesn't necessarily mean I'm going to pack one every day of my life in the off chance one might be needed again.

I can probably think of 20lbs+ of gear, that can't be readily improvised, that "might" be called upon at some rare point and time that would save a life otherwise lost... but... I don't EDC those on my person, either. ;)

Not knocking anyone's choices, I was just curious about the import of a tourniquet that a thread would be dedicated to them. It made me wonder if I was missing something about some alternate use.
It’s kinda like a gun. I’d rather have it and not need it then need it and not have it…. It’s up to each of us to choose what is important to have on our person.
 
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For $30 ish dollars a purpose built CAT-T is a no brainer.
I agree. A purpose built is definately a field trauma pack include. I have a ton of gear in mine that is purpose built and would absoutely save lives in the proper situation. It's just "bulky" and such a low proability of being employed that it's not something I would think of for an EDC kit.

I'm sure there are a lot of people that have never had any training on how to effectively employ an impovised tourniquet. I get it. I'm sure there would also be a large number of people that might happen upon my purpose built device and wouldn't have the foggiest idea of what it actually was and likely confused as to how to use it effectively even if they identified it's purpose.

Effective training saves lives. Dedicated devices can improve the odds and icrease survivability, but it's of little use and can't replace the training element.

Just sayin...
 
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I agree. A purpose built is definately a field trauma pack include. I have a ton of gear in mine that is purpose built and would absoutely save lives in the proper situation. It's just "bulky" and such a low proability of being employed that it's not something I would think of for an EDC kit.

I'm sure there are a lot of people that have never had any training on how to effectively employ an impovised tourniquet. I get it. I'm sure there would also be a large number of people that might happen upon my purpose built device and wouldn't have the foggiest idea of what it actually was and likely confused as to how to use it effectively even if they identified it's purpose.

Effective training saves lives. Dedicated devices can improve the odds and icrease survivability, but it's of little use and can't replace the training element.

Just sayin...
Agreed, buying gear and having no training isn’t much use, kind of like people who buy guns but don’t adequately practice and instead throw money at gear.

Thankfully it doesn’t take much skill or training to be able to adequately apply a tourniquet.
 
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I also don’t believe in micro pistols. You would probably claim what I carry on my person everyday is “bulky.”
WOW.. Sure took a massive leap there, didn't ya... :s0140::s0140:

Cool your jets. It was a simple question out of curiosity. Like if there was a thread on EDC'ing epi-pens or endotracheal tubes. One might be curious to read why others might feel it necessary to have one ready in their pockets.👍
 
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All that being said, i would definitely love to take some training on how to improvise tourniquets effectively. I feel like that's just a good skill to have.
Something that can be pulled very tight and something that is rigid that can be used as a windlass, then something to secure the windlass so it doesn’t come unwound after being turned several times. I’m sure there’s a video on the internet.

I’ve put my leg to sleep with tourniquets just for practice.
 
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WOW.. Sure took a massive leap there, didn't ya... :s0140::s0140:

Cool your jets. It was a simple question out of curiosity. Like if there was a thread on EDC'ing epi-pens or endotracheal tubes. One might be curious to read why others might feel it necessary to have one ready in their pockets.👍
All I am saying is that if you think a tourniquet is bulky then I would guess you would think other pieces of gear were as well. My apologies. Not trying to ruffle feathers here….
 
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WOW.. Sure took a massive leap there, didn't ya... :s0140::s0140:

Cool your jets. It was a simple question out of curiosity. Like if there was a thread on EDC'ing epi-pens or endotracheal tubes. One might be curious to read why others might feel it necessary to have one ready in their pockets.👍

All I am saying is that if you think a tourniquet is bulky then I would guess you would think other pieces of gear were as well. My apologies. Not trying to ruffle feathers here….
You guys just need to get with the times and carry a purse. Then you can also yell at people for being bigots when they question what you have in the bag.

“It’s Ma’am!”
 
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Something that can be pulled very tight and something that is rigid that can be used as a windlass, then something to secure the windlass so it doesn’t come unwound after being turned several times. I’m sure there’s a video on the internet.

I’ve put my leg to sleep with tourniquets just for practice.
It's not quite that simple, which if going by what a person sees in the movies is their guide, the end result might not be as expected, but yeah. Before nifty dedicated devices where ever even invented... improvised have saved a lot lives. Shock!! ;)

Tying a strap of cloth or cinching a belt nice and tight like Rambo isn't going to cut it though.

That said, a dedicated device is certainly the better option for other reasons as well. An improvised, if applied properly will save a life but also dramatically increases the risk of eventual loss of limb or permanent damage. Proper application doesn't end with just cranking it on.

Anyway, I didn't mean to spark an "in depth" on them, I was just curious why it would seem to be such a key item for EDC.

~Cheers
 
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It's not quite that simple, which if going by what a person sees in the movies is their guide, the end result might not be as expected, but yeah. Before nifty dedicated devices where ever even invented... improised have saved a lot lives. Shock!! ;)

Tying a strap of cloth or cinching a belt nice and tight like Rambo isn't going to cut it though.

That said, a dedicated device is certainly the better option for other reasons as well. An improvised, if applied properly will save a life but also dramatically increases the risk of eventual loss of limb or permanent damage. Proper application doesn't end with just cranking it on.

Anyway, I didn't mean to spark an "in depth" on them, I was just curious why it would seem to be such a key item for EDC.

~Cheers
You’d have to explain that more because my description would mimic a dedicated purpose built tourniquet exactly.
 
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All I am saying is that if you think a tourniquet is bulky then I would guess you would think other pieces of gear were as well.
By "bulky" I don't mean the overall size as being uncarriable. What it means to me is... given a fixed sized EDC pouch and given the option of (one) tourniquet device vs. 3-5 other high demand, multi use, non-improvisable and frequently useful items... I wouldn't chose the tourniquet as "too bulky" in trade-off.

That said... I carry a crap load of readily accessible gear in my vehicles... including a full field trauma pack. Right down to a stetho, BP cuff, suture kits and neck brace. EDC on my person.. every item has to meet certain criteria. Larger single purpose items for "someday I might need one" doesn't qualify.;)

That's just me.
 
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In the Boston bombing there were dozens of improvised tourniquets used to treat victims, and every single one failed to occlude bloodflow effectively. I have the report on it lying around somewhere if you want to read it. Knowing how to improvise one is great, but it is less effective than a purpose built tool.
I have absolutely no doubt about that. I don't know how many people have really sought out training for something like that. I would hazard to say that if they HAD dedicated devices available, the result would have only been marginally better. Would they be able to identify it in a kit? Know how that specific model is used? Proper placement so it's actually effective? Any additonal life saved due to a dedicated device is certainly desireable, but it's also not the end all, be all and only solution.

A dedicated device doesn't guarantee anything if not used properly.

I can say this with absolute certainty though. Many lives have been saved by improvised tourniquets LONG before the advent of commercialy available dedicated end user devices where ever invented.
 
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Thankfully it doesn’t take much skill or training to be able to adequately apply a tourniquet.
Exactly. Improvised or dedicated, it's not rocket science. Dedicated are "safer" and make it easier, if you know how to use that strap design. Either way requires at least some basic understanding though.
 
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For those who argue that you don’t need a TQ because you have a belt, shirt, bandanna, and sticks that work just as well…. Let me play devils advocate. Not trying to argue (do what you want) just something to think about.

Let’s just say you take a round in the arm or are cut deep enough that it renders that limb incapable of being used. I would be interested in watching that individual source the material they need and apply them one handed, Efficiently, under stress (Easily WITH training).

Cause I can tell you that with a Industry standard TQ like the CAT it can be deployed and applied quickly and correctly with one hand.

We aren’t guaranteed to have someone to come to our aid or help us in a time of need. Sometimes all we have is ourselves.
 
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I saw a video of a policeman do that with a Lays bag of chips and some tape to a person with a sucking chest wound!

He dumped the chips out and taped it to the wound. It was quick thinking and well done. EMT’s showed up and gave him a look and he was like, “it was what was available.”
This!!
In an emergency, if you have the knowledge, you'll know what you can improvise with.

To try to create a list with explanations is too cumbersome, so i suggest KISS: something cut fabric, duct/ industrial tape, your cleanest fabic, thermal blankets, tampons, and ability to contact 911.
 
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As someone who has went through quite a bit of medical with the military and civilian courses to include EMT. I agree with both the aspects of belts being used and improvising. However, as said you cannot replace the accessibility of a CAT for that purpose. Nevertheless, those can be applied differently such as a hasty tourniquet and so forth . As said in my previous post; I carry just about everything I can in my vehicle however, don’t normally carry a CAT for EDC instead I always have a belt on and an Israeli bandage. I personally feel I can do more with the combination of those if needed . You will struggle to stop inguinal bleeding with a CAT as you cannot get it high enough. I’m trying to find a way I can carry both and feel comfortable haven’t yet. I’m can carry a RATS a lot easier. Like a firearm carry how you train, what your comfortable with, and always try and improve your skills.
 
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For those who argue that you don’t need a TQ because you have a belt, shirt, bandanna, and sticks that work just as well…. Let me play devils advocate. Not trying to argue (do what you want) just something to think about.

Let’s just say you take a round in the arm or are cut deep enough that it renders that limb incapable of being used. I would be interested in watching that individual source the material they need and apply them one handed, Efficiently, under stress (Easily WITH training).
I think the point is being missed. No one is arguing that a TQ kit is worthless or won't potentially save a life. The topic seemed to be EDC kit. They're a little single purpose and bulky to stuff in your pockets, but anyone is welcome to pack one every day of their lives in the very highly unlikely event they would ever be faced with a life threatening bleeder, in an extremity, it's you, and one of your arms has been rendered inoperable. 🤣

Personally, I think the probability of those sets of circumstances to all line up... that packing a TQ kit is going to be absolutely life or death... is astronomically minimal.

IMHO, the whole point of an EDC kit is to have readily available items that will cover a wide array of "probable" circumstances that may save a life. To ME, a TQ kit doesn't make the list. Either does an epi-pen, an anti-venom kit, glucagon.. or a multitude of others that would be much more highly likely to be encounterable, life saving, and not improviseable... like a TQ is. ;)

I didn't mean to offend anyone or demean their TQ kits. I've never even considered one as practical/useful for EDC and was just curious if there were some other features or multi uses I wasn't aware of that seemed to make them such a hot EDC item. There are new innovations every day so... it's always good to be curious. We would never learn anything, otherwise.

I'm done.👍
 
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In the Boston bombing there were dozens of improvised tourniquets used to treat victims, and every single one failed to occlude bloodflow effectively. I have the report on it lying around somewhere if you want to read it. Knowing how to improvise one is great, but it is less effective than a purpose built tool.
Maybe they failed because they were improperly applied. Personally, i would not use a waist belt that needs to have a new hole punched to meet the smaller diameter. Cinch belts are best in the belt options, but you HAVE TO KNOW what you are doing, which comes from emergency training.
 

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