What type of medical gear do you regularly carry?

  • Don’t need it, I can just call 911

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Tourniquet only

    Votes: 2 9.1%
  • Tourniquet and a little more (explain)

    Votes: 13 59.1%
  • Tourniquet and A LOT MORE (explain)

    Votes: 2 9.1%
  • Nothing right now, but I think I should…

    Votes: 5 22.7%

  • Total voters
    22
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I saw in the everyday carry thread that some people are carrying tourniquets.

Since tourniquets are only good for the limbs and do nothing for the joints (groin, neck, armpits, or the box (abdomen) I was thinking that celox impregnated gauze or similarly, quick clot gauze to push into serious wounds that a tourniquet would be useless for, would be something to seriously consider.

Since blood loss is the #1 cause of preventable death regarding traumatic wounds, I thought that might be something worth thinking about. This poll is to gauge what is already being done and promote discussion. I haven’t got into the daily carry of medical gear yet, but my cargo shorts could definitely hold some. When I go to work I typically carry a backpack with a medical pouch on it that has some TQ’s, Israeli bandages, gauze and other medical items that could be used to prevent significant blood loss until EMT’s arrive. What do you carry?
 
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Carried in my left back pocket.

34396EF8-29EF-4B34-A290-1970B23A8495.jpeg
 
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I have an extensive first aid kit in my truck. And I'm on board with carrying a TQ on my person, I just haven't figured out how to do it yet. :confused:
Yep, same. Ankle rigs are advertised for things like that, but just as well I think a pouch that fits my cargo shorts pocket in the summer would work well, and since I wear Duluth Firehose cargo pants in the winter, the pocket method would work for that too.
 
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That and a plastic bag and you got yourself the solution to a sucking chest wound. Haha
I saw a video of a policeman do that with a Lays bag of chips and some tape to a person with a sucking chest wound!

He dumped the chips out and taped it to the wound. It was quick thinking and well done. EMT’s showed up and gave him a look and he was like, “it was what was available.”
 
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Yep, same. Ankle rigs are advertised for things like that, but just as well I think a pouch that fits my cargo shorts pocket in the summer would work well, and since I wear Duluth Firehose cargo pants in the winter, the pocket method would work for that too.
My problem is I already carry a wallet, phone, spare mag, knife, pepper spray, and a flash light...and a gun of course. My pockets are already pretty full. The ankle rigs seem to work well and I'll probably pick one up at some point but you can't exactly wear them in summer time with shorts.
 
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And how is that used?
I'm being literal. I cut meat for a living, have for a couple decades. You get cut sometimes. Heavy duty bandaids are used for booboos. If your still leakin , wrap tape over bandaid. Electricians tape is pretty nice because you can clinch it down and apply pressure to stop the bleeding, then back it off when the flow has slowed. Mechanics like it too.
Works good when you can't completely stop what you're doing. Works well oily and dirty.
No , I wouldn't tape over a bullet hole. But I rarely get shot at while I'm working. I do get cut a couple times a year.
 
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I saw a video of a policeman do that with a Lays bag of chips and some tape to a person with a sucking chest wound!

He dumped the chips out and taped it to the wound. It was quick thinking and well done. EMT’s showed up and gave him a look and he was like, “it was what was available.”
Yup. Learned that trick in the marines.
 
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Combat first aid during Vietnam... The only thing we regularly carried was a bandage. And on our web gear there was a pouch, dedicated to carrying one bandage. A bandage was basically a large sanitary napkin with long tails of gauze to provide compression to a wound and the napkin to protect and seal the wound. But, we were extensively trained to treat wounds and/or injuries with whatever we had around us. Sticks and shoelaces, and/or a belt could provide tourniquet pressure. A cigarette pack or C-Ration trash was used to seal a sucking chest wound. A stick, board, or rolled up paper can provide rigidity for a splint.

It is prudent to carry as much first aid equipment as possible, but when you can't do so, look around and the world is a warehouse of medical supplies.

And now I'll share another one of my dumb stories...
It was maybe 40+ years ago. I was at a family reunion, where a very young cousin had split her head open on the playground equipment. Blood was pumping as head wounds do, the women were all freaking, but simultaneously another Veteran cousin and I converged on this little girl, and without speaking a word, we got the bleeding controlled with nothing but our bare hands, until we could summons enough rags, towels, whatever, and get the little girl carted off to the emergency room. Sometimes the only medical equipment a feller has is his hands and his training.

From my days of boating and hunting, I'm insistent on a carried knife for anyone on my boat or in my hunting party. And that doesn't mean in a tackle box or in the glove box. With a knife, a huge array of first aid equipment can be fabricated, even from the shirt on ones back.
 
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Combat first aid during Vietnam... The only thing we regularly carried was a bandage. And on our web gear there was a pouch, dedicated to carrying one bandage. A bandage was basically a large sanitary napkin with long tails of gauze to provide compression to a wound and the napkin to protect and seal the wound. But, we were extensively trained to treat wounds and/or injuries with whatever we had around us. Sticks and shoelaces, and/or a belt could provide tourniquet pressure. A cigarette pack or C-Ration trash was used to seal a sucking chest wound. A stick, board, or rolled up paper can provide rigidity for a splint.

It is prudent to carry as much first aid equipment as possible, but when you can't do so, look around and the world is a warehouse of medical supplies.
That was still standard issue (and doctrine) clear into the early 90’s!
 
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I carry a sharp knife and a ball-point pen in case I have to do an emergency tracheotomy!

:s0045:

only $41.

I'd also suggest a Tactical IO device as well


This is what you put in the kit you label "I just shot an intruder and now want to keep them alive in the most painful way possible"

This is used to drill an interosseous IV into someone's tibia. Yes, drill an IV needle into the shin bone.

Video not for the squeamish
 

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